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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.12

Tests with new model asparagus harvester
December 1957
Volume 11, Number 12

Research articles

Retail grocery store services: Location, ownership, size, among factors determining whether self-service, clerk-service or combination is offered customers
by Marilyn Dunsing, Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The second of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and by the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The second of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and by the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
Improved asparagus harvester: Second experimental set-level, nonselective machine used to harvest test plots in commercial fields during 1957 season
by Robert A. Kepner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Relative yields of green asparagus obtained by mechanical harvesting and by hand cutting, the operational characteristics of the machine in commercial plantings, and plant growth characteristics that influence the results of set-level harvesting, were studied in field test plots on two types of soil during the 1957 cannery season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Relative yields of green asparagus obtained by mechanical harvesting and by hand cutting, the operational characteristics of the machine in commercial plantings, and plant growth characteristics that influence the results of set-level harvesting, were studied in field test plots on two types of soil during the 1957 cannery season.
Refertilization of rose clover: Carryover effects of superphosphate applied in one treatment compared with results from annual applications of same rates
by W. E. Martin, W. A. Williams, Walter H. Johnson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first trials of rose clover in California were made in 1944 as part of Research Project 1194B. Rose clover, an annual reseeding legume, is well adapted to soils low in phosphate or sulfur and on which bur clover scarcely exists. It is a good companion crop for subterranean clover. In addition to increased green forage in the spring they produce high quality dry feed for summer and fall.
The first trials of rose clover in California were made in 1944 as part of Research Project 1194B. Rose clover, an annual reseeding legume, is well adapted to soils low in phosphate or sulfur and on which bur clover scarcely exists. It is a good companion crop for subterranean clover. In addition to increased green forage in the spring they produce high quality dry feed for summer and fall.
Blanking and shrivel disorders of fresh market sweet corn: Strong winds during pollinating periods important cause of blanking disorder occurring on sweet corn for fresh market
by James W. Cameron, Donald A. Cole
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Incomplete ear fill—blanking—in fresh market sweet corn is due to the failure of individual kernels to begin development and has been particularly troublesome in the Coachella Valley. Usually blanking is most serious near the tip of the ear, but it can extend over the body of the ear.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Incomplete ear fill—blanking—in fresh market sweet corn is due to the failure of individual kernels to begin development and has been particularly troublesome in the Coachella Valley. Usually blanking is most serious near the tip of the ear, but it can extend over the body of the ear.
Blanking and shrivel disorders of fresh market sweet corn: Investigations indicate cultural practices may influence the incidence of shrivel of developing kernels on market corn
by C. A. Shadbolt, A. Van Maren, V. H. Schweers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A shrivelling—or arested development—of the kernels of fresh market sweet corn has been observed for several years in the San Joaquin Valley, the Coachella Valley and the Riverside area.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A shrivelling—or arested development—of the kernels of fresh market sweet corn has been observed for several years in the San Joaquin Valley, the Coachella Valley and the Riverside area.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.12

Tests with new model asparagus harvester
December 1957
Volume 11, Number 12

Research articles

Retail grocery store services: Location, ownership, size, among factors determining whether self-service, clerk-service or combination is offered customers
by Marilyn Dunsing, Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The second of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and by the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The second of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and by the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
Improved asparagus harvester: Second experimental set-level, nonselective machine used to harvest test plots in commercial fields during 1957 season
by Robert A. Kepner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Relative yields of green asparagus obtained by mechanical harvesting and by hand cutting, the operational characteristics of the machine in commercial plantings, and plant growth characteristics that influence the results of set-level harvesting, were studied in field test plots on two types of soil during the 1957 cannery season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Relative yields of green asparagus obtained by mechanical harvesting and by hand cutting, the operational characteristics of the machine in commercial plantings, and plant growth characteristics that influence the results of set-level harvesting, were studied in field test plots on two types of soil during the 1957 cannery season.
Refertilization of rose clover: Carryover effects of superphosphate applied in one treatment compared with results from annual applications of same rates
by W. E. Martin, W. A. Williams, Walter H. Johnson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first trials of rose clover in California were made in 1944 as part of Research Project 1194B. Rose clover, an annual reseeding legume, is well adapted to soils low in phosphate or sulfur and on which bur clover scarcely exists. It is a good companion crop for subterranean clover. In addition to increased green forage in the spring they produce high quality dry feed for summer and fall.
The first trials of rose clover in California were made in 1944 as part of Research Project 1194B. Rose clover, an annual reseeding legume, is well adapted to soils low in phosphate or sulfur and on which bur clover scarcely exists. It is a good companion crop for subterranean clover. In addition to increased green forage in the spring they produce high quality dry feed for summer and fall.
Blanking and shrivel disorders of fresh market sweet corn: Strong winds during pollinating periods important cause of blanking disorder occurring on sweet corn for fresh market
by James W. Cameron, Donald A. Cole
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Incomplete ear fill—blanking—in fresh market sweet corn is due to the failure of individual kernels to begin development and has been particularly troublesome in the Coachella Valley. Usually blanking is most serious near the tip of the ear, but it can extend over the body of the ear.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Incomplete ear fill—blanking—in fresh market sweet corn is due to the failure of individual kernels to begin development and has been particularly troublesome in the Coachella Valley. Usually blanking is most serious near the tip of the ear, but it can extend over the body of the ear.
Blanking and shrivel disorders of fresh market sweet corn: Investigations indicate cultural practices may influence the incidence of shrivel of developing kernels on market corn
by C. A. Shadbolt, A. Van Maren, V. H. Schweers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A shrivelling—or arested development—of the kernels of fresh market sweet corn has been observed for several years in the San Joaquin Valley, the Coachella Valley and the Riverside area.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A shrivelling—or arested development—of the kernels of fresh market sweet corn has been observed for several years in the San Joaquin Valley, the Coachella Valley and the Riverside area.

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