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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.11

Height of budding affects citrus bud union
November 1957
Volume 11, Number 11

Research articles

Rapid pack system for oranges: Designed for lemon packing and adapted for oranges, method is essentially a result of long term motion and time analyses
by Roy J. Smith, Haruo Najima
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new method of packing oranges—called rapid pack—was in operation during the 1957 season on a citrus ranch near Santa Paula.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new method of packing oranges—called rapid pack—was in operation during the 1957 season on a citrus ranch near Santa Paula.
Organic chemicals on citrus: Stimulation of tree growth resulted from addition of certain pure compounds to nutrient cultures in glasshouse studies
by Joseph N. Brusca, A. R. C. Haas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Organic manures or cover crops in southern California citrus orchards have—to a large extent—been abandoned. Scarcity, increased costs, rapid disappearance of organic matter in many soils, and a lack of strong evidence as to its actual benefit to the tree, are among the factors that have limited their use.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Organic manures or cover crops in southern California citrus orchards have—to a large extent—been abandoned. Scarcity, increased costs, rapid disappearance of organic matter in many soils, and a lack of strong evidence as to its actual benefit to the tree, are among the factors that have limited their use.
High and low budding of citrus: Malformation of bud union of citrus trees on Sampson tangelo, and Cleopatra mandarin stock seems related to budding height
by W. P. Bitters, R. G. Platt, John A. Brusca, John A. Brusca, N. W. Dukeshire
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Malformed bud unions on young citrus trees—particularly lemons—budded upon Cleopatra mandarin and Sampson tangelo rootstocks vary in relation to the height of the budding. The reasons for the variations in bud union reaction with height of budding are not known but approximately 8″ seems to be the critical height.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Malformed bud unions on young citrus trees—particularly lemons—budded upon Cleopatra mandarin and Sampson tangelo rootstocks vary in relation to the height of the budding. The reasons for the variations in bud union reaction with height of budding are not known but approximately 8″ seems to be the critical height.
Grocery stores in California: Analytical study of representative retail grocery stores made to determine factors affecting store characteristics
by Jessie V. Coles, Marilyn Dunsing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and the United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The first of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and the United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
Natural food flavor intensity: Apricot, peach, and pear nectars studied to determine the sweetness-acid-flavor relationship in a natural food product
by Rose Marie Pangborn, Marion J. Simone, Elly Hinreiner Platou
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flavor and sweetness are closely related factors—especially in fruit products—but there exists a level at which added sucrose ceases to enhance the flavor of the product and the relationship between sweetness and flavor is influenced by acidity.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flavor and sweetness are closely related factors—especially in fruit products—but there exists a level at which added sucrose ceases to enhance the flavor of the product and the relationship between sweetness and flavor is influenced by acidity.
Spider mite on walnuts: Promising results obtained with three miticides tested in control experiments in infested walnut orchard at San Jose
by A. E. Michelbocher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most destructive species of spider mites—found in localities where experimental investigations were conducted in 1956—was the European red mite. Infestations of the Pacific spider mite and the two-spotted spider mite were limited and noneconomic.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most destructive species of spider mites—found in localities where experimental investigations were conducted in 1956—was the European red mite. Infestations of the Pacific spider mite and the two-spotted spider mite were limited and noneconomic.
Use of geese for grass control: Amount of grass, available water, field size, type of crop, among factors affecting use of naturally selective weeders
by Chester C. Conley, Irvin L. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of geese to clean fields of tough perennial grasses—such as Johnson, Bermuda, and nutgrass—has expanded in recent years to include nearly all broadleaf crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of geese to clean fields of tough perennial grasses—such as Johnson, Bermuda, and nutgrass—has expanded in recent years to include nearly all broadleaf crops.
Sewage sludges for agriculture: Production of high value specialty crops, nursery stock and similar crops possible disposal outlet for treated sewage
by R. H. Sciaroni, O. R. Lunt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies have shown that various aspects of agricultural production can dispose of large quantities of sewage sludge.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies have shown that various aspects of agricultural production can dispose of large quantities of sewage sludge.
Labor field-transit machines: Planting, thinning, weeding, other hand operations in some row crops facilitated by within-field transportation for labor
by Bernarr J. Hall, Robert G. Curley, John H. MacGillivray
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Developed—primarily—for use in vegetable crops, labor transport machines consist essentially of a frame mounted across the rear of a wheel tractor to extend outward far enough to carry several laborers who ride in a prone position and perform such operations as thinning, weeding, trimming and planting. The length of the frame can be varied to carry as many as eight men—one man per row. The beds for the workers can be moved to match the row spacing of the crop. The frame is attached to the power lift of the tractor to permit the operator to adjust its height above the ground.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Developed—primarily—for use in vegetable crops, labor transport machines consist essentially of a frame mounted across the rear of a wheel tractor to extend outward far enough to carry several laborers who ride in a prone position and perform such operations as thinning, weeding, trimming and planting. The length of the frame can be varied to carry as many as eight men—one man per row. The beds for the workers can be moved to match the row spacing of the crop. The frame is attached to the power lift of the tractor to permit the operator to adjust its height above the ground.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.11

Height of budding affects citrus bud union
November 1957
Volume 11, Number 11

Research articles

Rapid pack system for oranges: Designed for lemon packing and adapted for oranges, method is essentially a result of long term motion and time analyses
by Roy J. Smith, Haruo Najima
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new method of packing oranges—called rapid pack—was in operation during the 1957 season on a citrus ranch near Santa Paula.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new method of packing oranges—called rapid pack—was in operation during the 1957 season on a citrus ranch near Santa Paula.
Organic chemicals on citrus: Stimulation of tree growth resulted from addition of certain pure compounds to nutrient cultures in glasshouse studies
by Joseph N. Brusca, A. R. C. Haas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Organic manures or cover crops in southern California citrus orchards have—to a large extent—been abandoned. Scarcity, increased costs, rapid disappearance of organic matter in many soils, and a lack of strong evidence as to its actual benefit to the tree, are among the factors that have limited their use.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Organic manures or cover crops in southern California citrus orchards have—to a large extent—been abandoned. Scarcity, increased costs, rapid disappearance of organic matter in many soils, and a lack of strong evidence as to its actual benefit to the tree, are among the factors that have limited their use.
High and low budding of citrus: Malformation of bud union of citrus trees on Sampson tangelo, and Cleopatra mandarin stock seems related to budding height
by W. P. Bitters, R. G. Platt, John A. Brusca, John A. Brusca, N. W. Dukeshire
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Malformed bud unions on young citrus trees—particularly lemons—budded upon Cleopatra mandarin and Sampson tangelo rootstocks vary in relation to the height of the budding. The reasons for the variations in bud union reaction with height of budding are not known but approximately 8″ seems to be the critical height.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Malformed bud unions on young citrus trees—particularly lemons—budded upon Cleopatra mandarin and Sampson tangelo rootstocks vary in relation to the height of the budding. The reasons for the variations in bud union reaction with height of budding are not known but approximately 8″ seems to be the critical height.
Grocery stores in California: Analytical study of representative retail grocery stores made to determine factors affecting store characteristics
by Jessie V. Coles, Marilyn Dunsing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The first of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and the United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The first of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by Departments of Home Economics, University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and the United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
Natural food flavor intensity: Apricot, peach, and pear nectars studied to determine the sweetness-acid-flavor relationship in a natural food product
by Rose Marie Pangborn, Marion J. Simone, Elly Hinreiner Platou
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flavor and sweetness are closely related factors—especially in fruit products—but there exists a level at which added sucrose ceases to enhance the flavor of the product and the relationship between sweetness and flavor is influenced by acidity.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flavor and sweetness are closely related factors—especially in fruit products—but there exists a level at which added sucrose ceases to enhance the flavor of the product and the relationship between sweetness and flavor is influenced by acidity.
Spider mite on walnuts: Promising results obtained with three miticides tested in control experiments in infested walnut orchard at San Jose
by A. E. Michelbocher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most destructive species of spider mites—found in localities where experimental investigations were conducted in 1956—was the European red mite. Infestations of the Pacific spider mite and the two-spotted spider mite were limited and noneconomic.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The most destructive species of spider mites—found in localities where experimental investigations were conducted in 1956—was the European red mite. Infestations of the Pacific spider mite and the two-spotted spider mite were limited and noneconomic.
Use of geese for grass control: Amount of grass, available water, field size, type of crop, among factors affecting use of naturally selective weeders
by Chester C. Conley, Irvin L. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of geese to clean fields of tough perennial grasses—such as Johnson, Bermuda, and nutgrass—has expanded in recent years to include nearly all broadleaf crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of geese to clean fields of tough perennial grasses—such as Johnson, Bermuda, and nutgrass—has expanded in recent years to include nearly all broadleaf crops.
Sewage sludges for agriculture: Production of high value specialty crops, nursery stock and similar crops possible disposal outlet for treated sewage
by R. H. Sciaroni, O. R. Lunt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies have shown that various aspects of agricultural production can dispose of large quantities of sewage sludge.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies have shown that various aspects of agricultural production can dispose of large quantities of sewage sludge.
Labor field-transit machines: Planting, thinning, weeding, other hand operations in some row crops facilitated by within-field transportation for labor
by Bernarr J. Hall, Robert G. Curley, John H. MacGillivray
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Developed—primarily—for use in vegetable crops, labor transport machines consist essentially of a frame mounted across the rear of a wheel tractor to extend outward far enough to carry several laborers who ride in a prone position and perform such operations as thinning, weeding, trimming and planting. The length of the frame can be varied to carry as many as eight men—one man per row. The beds for the workers can be moved to match the row spacing of the crop. The frame is attached to the power lift of the tractor to permit the operator to adjust its height above the ground.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Developed—primarily—for use in vegetable crops, labor transport machines consist essentially of a frame mounted across the rear of a wheel tractor to extend outward far enough to carry several laborers who ride in a prone position and perform such operations as thinning, weeding, trimming and planting. The length of the frame can be varied to carry as many as eight men—one man per row. The beds for the workers can be moved to match the row spacing of the crop. The frame is attached to the power lift of the tractor to permit the operator to adjust its height above the ground.

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