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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.10

Streamflow increased by brush removal
October 1957
Volume 11, Number 10

Research articles

Spring flow affected by brush: Removal of nearby deep-rooted plants improved water flow of springs in studies in foothills of Madera and Lake counties
by H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Conversion of large acreages of California brushland to grassland—to increase forage for livestock and game—has resulted, in many cases, in an increase in spring and stream flow.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Conversion of large acreages of California brushland to grassland—to increase forage for livestock and game—has resulted, in many cases, in an increase in spring and stream flow.
Nitrogen carryover on range: Test plots on sagebrush range indicate effectiveness of nitrogen fertilizer can carry over into third growing season
by B. L. Kay, J. E. Street, C. W. Rimbey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizers applied to range-land in amounts greater than the forage plants require during the first growing season produced increased yields in the second and third seasons in tests in Modoc County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizers applied to range-land in amounts greater than the forage plants require during the first growing season produced increased yields in the second and third seasons in tests in Modoc County.
Sprinkler fertilizing system: Continual feeding of crop plants by applying fertilizers with irrigation by sprinkler systems demonstrated to be effective
by R. H. Sciaroni, L. J. Booher, Bryan C. Sandlin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ferti-irrigation—injection of water soluble fertilizers into sprinkler systems—has proved to be effective and economical in three years of tests in San Mateo County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ferti-irrigation—injection of water soluble fertilizers into sprinkler systems—has proved to be effective and economical in three years of tests in San Mateo County.
Coniferous seedling survival: Jeffrey pine seedlings outlived white fir, ponderosa pine, and incense cedar in drought tests involving simulated dew
by Edward C. Stone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine has a continuous distribution at medium and lower elevations in the Sierra and inner coast ranges of California but in the middle and south coast ranges it is found only in a few scattered locations.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine has a continuous distribution at medium and lower elevations in the Sierra and inner coast ranges of California but in the middle and south coast ranges it is found only in a few scattered locations.
Brushing for frost protection: Method and materials studied to determine ability to protect desert grown specialty vegetables against hazard of freezing
by S. A. Hart, F. W. Zink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Even in desert regions of mild climate, frost is often a hazard to specialty vegetables for the winter market.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Even in desert regions of mild climate, frost is often a hazard to specialty vegetables for the winter market.
Nematode resistance in plums: Various plum rootstocks found resistant to two widespread species of several recently classified root-knot nematodes
by C. J. Hansen, B. F. Lownsbery, C. O. Hesse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Earlier field trials indicated that certain plum rootstocks—Marianna 2623, Marianna 2624, and Myrobalan 29—are resistant to the one species of root-knot nematode recognized at the time the work was done. However, since then several species of root-knot nematodes have been classified. Two of these species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—are known to cause serious trouble in California orchards, so additional work was necessary to find out if the rootstocks are resistant to both species.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Earlier field trials indicated that certain plum rootstocks—Marianna 2623, Marianna 2624, and Myrobalan 29—are resistant to the one species of root-knot nematode recognized at the time the work was done. However, since then several species of root-knot nematodes have been classified. Two of these species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—are known to cause serious trouble in California orchards, so additional work was necessary to find out if the rootstocks are resistant to both species.
Blue-green mold on citrus: Ammonia gas used in citrus packing plants as fumigant for control of blue-green mold on Valencias, navels and lemons
by C. N. Roistacher, L. J. Klotz, I. L. Eaks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory experiments with anhydrous ammonia—for the control of blue-green decay in injured-inoculated fruit—developed a treatment that provided excellent protection for oranges and lemons. However, tests also revealed that the gas must be applied within the first 24-30-hour storage period to be effective, because at 68°F the green mold—Penicillium digitatum—will penetrate approximately one millimeter into the rind, beyond reach of the chemical. Therefore, fruit injured in picking, dumping and loading must be treated promptly to avoid infection.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory experiments with anhydrous ammonia—for the control of blue-green decay in injured-inoculated fruit—developed a treatment that provided excellent protection for oranges and lemons. However, tests also revealed that the gas must be applied within the first 24-30-hour storage period to be effective, because at 68°F the green mold—Penicillium digitatum—will penetrate approximately one millimeter into the rind, beyond reach of the chemical. Therefore, fruit injured in picking, dumping and loading must be treated promptly to avoid infection.
Leaf malady of avocado trees: Leaves of trees of several varieties on various rootstocks seriously affected when placed under glasshouse conditions
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaves of seedling avocado trees grown under glasshouse conditions—in cultures of silica sand or soil—have occasionally shown certain symptoms of nutritional deficiency.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaves of seedling avocado trees grown under glasshouse conditions—in cultures of silica sand or soil—have occasionally shown certain symptoms of nutritional deficiency.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.10

Streamflow increased by brush removal
October 1957
Volume 11, Number 10

Research articles

Spring flow affected by brush: Removal of nearby deep-rooted plants improved water flow of springs in studies in foothills of Madera and Lake counties
by H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Conversion of large acreages of California brushland to grassland—to increase forage for livestock and game—has resulted, in many cases, in an increase in spring and stream flow.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Conversion of large acreages of California brushland to grassland—to increase forage for livestock and game—has resulted, in many cases, in an increase in spring and stream flow.
Nitrogen carryover on range: Test plots on sagebrush range indicate effectiveness of nitrogen fertilizer can carry over into third growing season
by B. L. Kay, J. E. Street, C. W. Rimbey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizers applied to range-land in amounts greater than the forage plants require during the first growing season produced increased yields in the second and third seasons in tests in Modoc County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogen fertilizers applied to range-land in amounts greater than the forage plants require during the first growing season produced increased yields in the second and third seasons in tests in Modoc County.
Sprinkler fertilizing system: Continual feeding of crop plants by applying fertilizers with irrigation by sprinkler systems demonstrated to be effective
by R. H. Sciaroni, L. J. Booher, Bryan C. Sandlin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ferti-irrigation—injection of water soluble fertilizers into sprinkler systems—has proved to be effective and economical in three years of tests in San Mateo County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ferti-irrigation—injection of water soluble fertilizers into sprinkler systems—has proved to be effective and economical in three years of tests in San Mateo County.
Coniferous seedling survival: Jeffrey pine seedlings outlived white fir, ponderosa pine, and incense cedar in drought tests involving simulated dew
by Edward C. Stone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine has a continuous distribution at medium and lower elevations in the Sierra and inner coast ranges of California but in the middle and south coast ranges it is found only in a few scattered locations.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ponderosa pine has a continuous distribution at medium and lower elevations in the Sierra and inner coast ranges of California but in the middle and south coast ranges it is found only in a few scattered locations.
Brushing for frost protection: Method and materials studied to determine ability to protect desert grown specialty vegetables against hazard of freezing
by S. A. Hart, F. W. Zink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Even in desert regions of mild climate, frost is often a hazard to specialty vegetables for the winter market.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Even in desert regions of mild climate, frost is often a hazard to specialty vegetables for the winter market.
Nematode resistance in plums: Various plum rootstocks found resistant to two widespread species of several recently classified root-knot nematodes
by C. J. Hansen, B. F. Lownsbery, C. O. Hesse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Earlier field trials indicated that certain plum rootstocks—Marianna 2623, Marianna 2624, and Myrobalan 29—are resistant to the one species of root-knot nematode recognized at the time the work was done. However, since then several species of root-knot nematodes have been classified. Two of these species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—are known to cause serious trouble in California orchards, so additional work was necessary to find out if the rootstocks are resistant to both species.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Earlier field trials indicated that certain plum rootstocks—Marianna 2623, Marianna 2624, and Myrobalan 29—are resistant to the one species of root-knot nematode recognized at the time the work was done. However, since then several species of root-knot nematodes have been classified. Two of these species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica—are known to cause serious trouble in California orchards, so additional work was necessary to find out if the rootstocks are resistant to both species.
Blue-green mold on citrus: Ammonia gas used in citrus packing plants as fumigant for control of blue-green mold on Valencias, navels and lemons
by C. N. Roistacher, L. J. Klotz, I. L. Eaks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory experiments with anhydrous ammonia—for the control of blue-green decay in injured-inoculated fruit—developed a treatment that provided excellent protection for oranges and lemons. However, tests also revealed that the gas must be applied within the first 24-30-hour storage period to be effective, because at 68°F the green mold—Penicillium digitatum—will penetrate approximately one millimeter into the rind, beyond reach of the chemical. Therefore, fruit injured in picking, dumping and loading must be treated promptly to avoid infection.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory experiments with anhydrous ammonia—for the control of blue-green decay in injured-inoculated fruit—developed a treatment that provided excellent protection for oranges and lemons. However, tests also revealed that the gas must be applied within the first 24-30-hour storage period to be effective, because at 68°F the green mold—Penicillium digitatum—will penetrate approximately one millimeter into the rind, beyond reach of the chemical. Therefore, fruit injured in picking, dumping and loading must be treated promptly to avoid infection.
Leaf malady of avocado trees: Leaves of trees of several varieties on various rootstocks seriously affected when placed under glasshouse conditions
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaves of seedling avocado trees grown under glasshouse conditions—in cultures of silica sand or soil—have occasionally shown certain symptoms of nutritional deficiency.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaves of seedling avocado trees grown under glasshouse conditions—in cultures of silica sand or soil—have occasionally shown certain symptoms of nutritional deficiency.

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