California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Organic chemicals on citrus: Stimulation of tree growth resulted from addition of certain pure compounds to nutrient cultures in glasshouse studies

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Authors

Joseph N. Brusca, University of California
A. R. C. Haas, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(11):4-4.

Published November 01, 1957

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Abstract

Organic manures or cover crops in southern California citrus orchards have—to a large extent—been abandoned. Scarcity, increased costs, rapid disappearance of organic matter in many soils, and a lack of strong evidence as to its actual benefit to the tree, are among the factors that have limited their use.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1088

Organic chemicals on citrus: Stimulation of tree growth resulted from addition of certain pure compounds to nutrient cultures in glasshouse studies

Joseph N. Brusca, A. R. C. Haas
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Organic chemicals on citrus: Stimulation of tree growth resulted from addition of certain pure compounds to nutrient cultures in glasshouse studies

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Joseph N. Brusca, University of California
A. R. C. Haas, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(11):4-4.

Published November 01, 1957

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Organic manures or cover crops in southern California citrus orchards have—to a large extent—been abandoned. Scarcity, increased costs, rapid disappearance of organic matter in many soils, and a lack of strong evidence as to its actual benefit to the tree, are among the factors that have limited their use.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1088


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