California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

March-April 1989
Volume 43, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

California wineries: Growth and change in a dynamic industry
by George M. Cooke, Edward P. Vilas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vittorio Sattui founded a small winery in the North Beach area of San Francisco in 1885. His grandson, Daryl Sattui, operates a new Sattui winery near St. Helena in Napa County, built in 1985 during a period of substantial growth of the wine industry in California. Rated as medium size, the Sattui winery is equipped to produce 25,000 cases of wine a year (60,000 gallons). (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
A preliminary analysis of the geographic distribution, age, and size of California wineries shows that three-fourths of them were founded in the past 15 years. More than half of the new wineries are in north coastal counties and are rated as “mini” to small in size.
French prune trees: Refuge for grape leafhopper parasite
by L. Ted Wilson, Charles H. Pickett, Donald L. Flaherty, Teresa A. Bates
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Prune trees upwind from a vineyard provide an alternative refuge for the leafhopper egg parasite, Anagrus epos.
Prune trees planted next to vineyards allow early-season buildup of Anagrus epos, an important parasite of the grape leafhopper. After surviving the winter on an alternate host, the prune leafhopper, Anagrus moves into the vineyard in the spring, providing grape leaf-hopper control up to a month earlier than in vineyards not near prune tree refuges.
Integrated control of botrytis bunch rot of grape
by Larry J. Bettiga, W. Douglas Gubler, James J. Marois, Andrew M. Bledsoe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Canopy management by leaf removal plus one fungicide treatment protected grapes under conditions favoring rot.
Botrytis bunch rot of grape was significantly reduced by canopy management in this study. Integrating leaf removal with chemical control may reduce the need for multiple fungicide applications.
Attitudes of California milk producers toward bovine somatotropin
by Lydia Zepeda
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A 1987 survey showed that most dairy farmers are cautious about BST, and many would be reluctant to use it.
A survey in late 1987 revealed that, despite widespread publicity, many California dairy farmers had not yet heard of bovine somatotropin (BST), a milk production stimulator. Of those who had, most said they would either wait to see how well BST worked on other dairies before they tried it, or they wouldn't use it on their herds at all.
Resistant rootstocks may control fanleaf degeneration of grapevines
by M. Andrew Walker, James A. Wolpert, Edward P. Vilas, Austin C. Goheen, Lloyd A. Lider
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two rootstocks have shown good field resistance to the disease, caused by the grapevine fanleaf virus.
Two rootstock selections were found to be highly resistant to feeding by the dagger nematode, carrier of the disease, in large-scale Napa Valley tests and are being recommended for planting in infested vineyards.
An overview of traction research at University of California, Davis
by Shrini K. Upadhyaya, Dvoralaio Wulfsohn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil conditions are most important, but tire design significantly affects tractor efficiency and energy use.
Experiments using a specially designed device were conducted to determine the performance characteristics of tractor tires under various conditions. Radial ply tires showed superior performance over bias ply tires. Soil had a greater influence on traction capabilities than did tire design. Traction prediction equations for radial ply tires were developed.
IPM information delivery to pest control advisers
by Mary Louise Flint, Karen Klonsky
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A survey of pest control advisers suggests UC has made significant headway in providing IPM information.
The University of California's commitment to developing and encouraging the adoption of integrated pest management techniques over the past decade seems to be producing results. California pest control advisers surveyed looked to UC Cooperative Extension for information and were using many of the IPM techniques.
Comparison of added fats in diets of lactating dairy cows
by Edward J. DePeters, Kim D. Rager, Marilyn K. Pontius, Laura C. Hart, Brian K. Hamilton, Treasure M. Shell, Scott J. Taylor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Feed intakes were high and milk yields similar whether dairy cows were fed Alifet or grease in a 6-week study.
Type of fat–Allfet or grease–did not affect the production or composition of milk or feed intake of dairy cows during a 6-week study. Both types resulted in high feed intakes and similar milk yields.
Buffalograss as a low-maintenance turf
by Lin Wu, David R. Huff, M. Ali Harivandi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This ancient range grass has potential as a drought-tolerant, low-maintenance turf, if its defects can be improved.
Buffalograss, an ancient range species, has potential as a drought-tolerant, low-maintenance, short-stature turf, if defects can be overcome. Studies suggest improvements are possible in characteristics affecting seed production and persistence of winter green color. Vegetatively propagated cultivars may be available in 3 to 4 years.
Field-drying rice using modified swath harvesting
by Bryan M. Jenkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A modified swath harvesting technique protects rice from dew and allows field-drying without yield loss.
A technique for drying rice in windrows by covering them with stubble has been developed and field-tested. Modified swath harvesting reduces drying costs, and it protects the crop from dew, improving yield of head rice.
Preventive control of powdery mildew on grapevines
by Larry J. Bettiga
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several relatively new fungicides effectively controlled powdery mildew of grapes in vineyard trials.
Several recently developed fungicides effectively controlled powdery mildew of grapevines.
Some lepidopterous pests of central coast apricots
by William W. Coates, Robert A. Van Steenwyk, Carolyn Pickel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A spray at petal fall controls damage, which is caused mainly by fruittree leaf-roller and peach twig borer.
Studies in San Benito County apricot orchards showed that fruittree leaf roller caused most surface damage, and peach twig borer was responsible for most interior fruit damage. The preferred spray timing for all fruit-feeding lepidopterous pests except orange tortrix was at the petal-fall stage.
Desert alfalfa grazing–it's the leaf that counts
by Juan N. Guerrero, Vern L. Marble, Carlos Hernandez
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Lambs make profitable gains on desert alfalfa in winter, if they're moved to another pasture after 10 days.
Lambs turned into desert valley alfalfa fields during winter will make profitable gains if they are moved to another pasture after 10 days of grazing, when the alfalfa is nearly devoid of leaves.

News and Opinion

Food production in a changing world
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=43_2

March-April 1989
Volume 43, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

California wineries: Growth and change in a dynamic industry
by George M. Cooke, Edward P. Vilas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vittorio Sattui founded a small winery in the North Beach area of San Francisco in 1885. His grandson, Daryl Sattui, operates a new Sattui winery near St. Helena in Napa County, built in 1985 during a period of substantial growth of the wine industry in California. Rated as medium size, the Sattui winery is equipped to produce 25,000 cases of wine a year (60,000 gallons). (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
A preliminary analysis of the geographic distribution, age, and size of California wineries shows that three-fourths of them were founded in the past 15 years. More than half of the new wineries are in north coastal counties and are rated as “mini” to small in size.
French prune trees: Refuge for grape leafhopper parasite
by L. Ted Wilson, Charles H. Pickett, Donald L. Flaherty, Teresa A. Bates
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Prune trees upwind from a vineyard provide an alternative refuge for the leafhopper egg parasite, Anagrus epos.
Prune trees planted next to vineyards allow early-season buildup of Anagrus epos, an important parasite of the grape leafhopper. After surviving the winter on an alternate host, the prune leafhopper, Anagrus moves into the vineyard in the spring, providing grape leaf-hopper control up to a month earlier than in vineyards not near prune tree refuges.
Integrated control of botrytis bunch rot of grape
by Larry J. Bettiga, W. Douglas Gubler, James J. Marois, Andrew M. Bledsoe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Canopy management by leaf removal plus one fungicide treatment protected grapes under conditions favoring rot.
Botrytis bunch rot of grape was significantly reduced by canopy management in this study. Integrating leaf removal with chemical control may reduce the need for multiple fungicide applications.
Attitudes of California milk producers toward bovine somatotropin
by Lydia Zepeda
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A 1987 survey showed that most dairy farmers are cautious about BST, and many would be reluctant to use it.
A survey in late 1987 revealed that, despite widespread publicity, many California dairy farmers had not yet heard of bovine somatotropin (BST), a milk production stimulator. Of those who had, most said they would either wait to see how well BST worked on other dairies before they tried it, or they wouldn't use it on their herds at all.
Resistant rootstocks may control fanleaf degeneration of grapevines
by M. Andrew Walker, James A. Wolpert, Edward P. Vilas, Austin C. Goheen, Lloyd A. Lider
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two rootstocks have shown good field resistance to the disease, caused by the grapevine fanleaf virus.
Two rootstock selections were found to be highly resistant to feeding by the dagger nematode, carrier of the disease, in large-scale Napa Valley tests and are being recommended for planting in infested vineyards.
An overview of traction research at University of California, Davis
by Shrini K. Upadhyaya, Dvoralaio Wulfsohn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil conditions are most important, but tire design significantly affects tractor efficiency and energy use.
Experiments using a specially designed device were conducted to determine the performance characteristics of tractor tires under various conditions. Radial ply tires showed superior performance over bias ply tires. Soil had a greater influence on traction capabilities than did tire design. Traction prediction equations for radial ply tires were developed.
IPM information delivery to pest control advisers
by Mary Louise Flint, Karen Klonsky
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A survey of pest control advisers suggests UC has made significant headway in providing IPM information.
The University of California's commitment to developing and encouraging the adoption of integrated pest management techniques over the past decade seems to be producing results. California pest control advisers surveyed looked to UC Cooperative Extension for information and were using many of the IPM techniques.
Comparison of added fats in diets of lactating dairy cows
by Edward J. DePeters, Kim D. Rager, Marilyn K. Pontius, Laura C. Hart, Brian K. Hamilton, Treasure M. Shell, Scott J. Taylor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Feed intakes were high and milk yields similar whether dairy cows were fed Alifet or grease in a 6-week study.
Type of fat–Allfet or grease–did not affect the production or composition of milk or feed intake of dairy cows during a 6-week study. Both types resulted in high feed intakes and similar milk yields.
Buffalograss as a low-maintenance turf
by Lin Wu, David R. Huff, M. Ali Harivandi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This ancient range grass has potential as a drought-tolerant, low-maintenance turf, if its defects can be improved.
Buffalograss, an ancient range species, has potential as a drought-tolerant, low-maintenance, short-stature turf, if defects can be overcome. Studies suggest improvements are possible in characteristics affecting seed production and persistence of winter green color. Vegetatively propagated cultivars may be available in 3 to 4 years.
Field-drying rice using modified swath harvesting
by Bryan M. Jenkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A modified swath harvesting technique protects rice from dew and allows field-drying without yield loss.
A technique for drying rice in windrows by covering them with stubble has been developed and field-tested. Modified swath harvesting reduces drying costs, and it protects the crop from dew, improving yield of head rice.
Preventive control of powdery mildew on grapevines
by Larry J. Bettiga
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Several relatively new fungicides effectively controlled powdery mildew of grapes in vineyard trials.
Several recently developed fungicides effectively controlled powdery mildew of grapevines.
Some lepidopterous pests of central coast apricots
by William W. Coates, Robert A. Van Steenwyk, Carolyn Pickel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A spray at petal fall controls damage, which is caused mainly by fruittree leaf-roller and peach twig borer.
Studies in San Benito County apricot orchards showed that fruittree leaf roller caused most surface damage, and peach twig borer was responsible for most interior fruit damage. The preferred spray timing for all fruit-feeding lepidopterous pests except orange tortrix was at the petal-fall stage.
Desert alfalfa grazing–it's the leaf that counts
by Juan N. Guerrero, Vern L. Marble, Carlos Hernandez
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Lambs make profitable gains on desert alfalfa in winter, if they're moved to another pasture after 10 days.
Lambs turned into desert valley alfalfa fields during winter will make profitable gains if they are moved to another pasture after 10 days of grazing, when the alfalfa is nearly devoid of leaves.

News and Opinion

Food production in a changing world
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/