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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.1

Superior quality of new hybrid tomatoes
January 1956
Volume 10, Number 1

Research articles

Irrigation pumping plant costs: Capacity of well, design and power of pumping plant must be engineered to fit water needs of crop for operating economy
by V. H. Scott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
George Koumbarakis, graduate student in irrigation, University of California, Dauis, at the time the following study was made, assisted in the work.
George Koumbarakis, graduate student in irrigation, University of California, Dauis, at the time the following study was made, assisted in the work.
Three new hybrid tomatoes: Crosses between male-sterile and fertile varieties prove superior for quality and early yield of market tomatoes
by Charles M. Rick, C. Grant Baughn, Bernarr J. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A high early yield of marketable fruit was the goal achieved in an experiment in the breeding of hybrid tomatoes that started in 1947.
A high early yield of marketable fruit was the goal achieved in an experiment in the breeding of hybrid tomatoes that started in 1947.
Flare-up of oriental fruit moth: Costly outbreak of pest of peach orchards in 1954 resulted in co-operative research in 1955 to develop control program
by F. M. Summers, L. C. Brown, J. H. Foott, J. L. Quail
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
An outbreak of Oriental fruit moth— not Oriental fruit fly—caused appreciable crop damage in a small number of peach orchards near Kingsburg during the harvest of 1954. This was the first damaging flare-up of Oriental fruit moth —OFM—in the main peach belt of California.
An outbreak of Oriental fruit moth— not Oriental fruit fly—caused appreciable crop damage in a small number of peach orchards near Kingsburg during the harvest of 1954. This was the first damaging flare-up of Oriental fruit moth —OFM—in the main peach belt of California.
Powdery mildew on peach trees: Comparative effectiveness of sulfur and other chemicals for control of peach powdery mildew in tests near Linden
by Joseph M. Ogawa, Fred M. Charles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Peach powdery mildew—a fungus disease incited by Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.) Lev.—attacks leaves, twigs, and fruit of peach trees.
Peach powdery mildew—a fungus disease incited by Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.) Lev.—attacks leaves, twigs, and fruit of peach trees.
Citrus replant seedling tests: Trifoliate orange rootstock shows better growth in old citrus soil than other seedlings included in replant problem study
by J. P. Martin, W. P. Bitters, J. O. Ervin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The citrus replant problem varies greatly in severity in different soils and areas. Part of that variation appears to be related to the rootstock originally grown on the soil and the nature of the rootstock used for replanting.
The citrus replant problem varies greatly in severity in different soils and areas. Part of that variation appears to be related to the rootstock originally grown on the soil and the nature of the rootstock used for replanting.
Sulfur dioxide injury on citrus: Riverside tests show orange trees to be resistant to plantdamaging air pollutant at known atmospheric concentrations
by Ellis F. Darley, John T. Middleton, J. B. Kendrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Concentrations of sulfur dioxide—an important plant-damaging constituent of the atmosphere—vary from 0.01 part per million—ppm—to 0.24 ppm, and average about 0.06 ppm in the south coastal plain of California.
Concentrations of sulfur dioxide—an important plant-damaging constituent of the atmosphere—vary from 0.01 part per million—ppm—to 0.24 ppm, and average about 0.06 ppm in the south coastal plain of California.
Filbertworm Injury to Walnuts
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen Hitchcock, Arthur H. Retan
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Mechanized Cucumber Picking
by Bernarr J. Hall, John H. MacGillivray
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Manure as Source of Nitrogen
by T. W. Embleton, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Studies of tilled and nontilled citrus and avocado orchards show manure to be efficient in supplying nitrogen to tilled soil.
Studies of tilled and nontilled citrus and avocado orchards show manure to be efficient in supplying nitrogen to tilled soil.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.1

Superior quality of new hybrid tomatoes
January 1956
Volume 10, Number 1

Research articles

Irrigation pumping plant costs: Capacity of well, design and power of pumping plant must be engineered to fit water needs of crop for operating economy
by V. H. Scott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
George Koumbarakis, graduate student in irrigation, University of California, Dauis, at the time the following study was made, assisted in the work.
George Koumbarakis, graduate student in irrigation, University of California, Dauis, at the time the following study was made, assisted in the work.
Three new hybrid tomatoes: Crosses between male-sterile and fertile varieties prove superior for quality and early yield of market tomatoes
by Charles M. Rick, C. Grant Baughn, Bernarr J. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A high early yield of marketable fruit was the goal achieved in an experiment in the breeding of hybrid tomatoes that started in 1947.
A high early yield of marketable fruit was the goal achieved in an experiment in the breeding of hybrid tomatoes that started in 1947.
Flare-up of oriental fruit moth: Costly outbreak of pest of peach orchards in 1954 resulted in co-operative research in 1955 to develop control program
by F. M. Summers, L. C. Brown, J. H. Foott, J. L. Quail
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
An outbreak of Oriental fruit moth— not Oriental fruit fly—caused appreciable crop damage in a small number of peach orchards near Kingsburg during the harvest of 1954. This was the first damaging flare-up of Oriental fruit moth —OFM—in the main peach belt of California.
An outbreak of Oriental fruit moth— not Oriental fruit fly—caused appreciable crop damage in a small number of peach orchards near Kingsburg during the harvest of 1954. This was the first damaging flare-up of Oriental fruit moth —OFM—in the main peach belt of California.
Powdery mildew on peach trees: Comparative effectiveness of sulfur and other chemicals for control of peach powdery mildew in tests near Linden
by Joseph M. Ogawa, Fred M. Charles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Peach powdery mildew—a fungus disease incited by Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.) Lev.—attacks leaves, twigs, and fruit of peach trees.
Peach powdery mildew—a fungus disease incited by Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.) Lev.—attacks leaves, twigs, and fruit of peach trees.
Citrus replant seedling tests: Trifoliate orange rootstock shows better growth in old citrus soil than other seedlings included in replant problem study
by J. P. Martin, W. P. Bitters, J. O. Ervin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The citrus replant problem varies greatly in severity in different soils and areas. Part of that variation appears to be related to the rootstock originally grown on the soil and the nature of the rootstock used for replanting.
The citrus replant problem varies greatly in severity in different soils and areas. Part of that variation appears to be related to the rootstock originally grown on the soil and the nature of the rootstock used for replanting.
Sulfur dioxide injury on citrus: Riverside tests show orange trees to be resistant to plantdamaging air pollutant at known atmospheric concentrations
by Ellis F. Darley, John T. Middleton, J. B. Kendrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Concentrations of sulfur dioxide—an important plant-damaging constituent of the atmosphere—vary from 0.01 part per million—ppm—to 0.24 ppm, and average about 0.06 ppm in the south coastal plain of California.
Concentrations of sulfur dioxide—an important plant-damaging constituent of the atmosphere—vary from 0.01 part per million—ppm—to 0.24 ppm, and average about 0.06 ppm in the south coastal plain of California.
Filbertworm Injury to Walnuts
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen Hitchcock, Arthur H. Retan
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Mechanized Cucumber Picking
by Bernarr J. Hall, John H. MacGillivray
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Manure as Source of Nitrogen
by T. W. Embleton, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Studies of tilled and nontilled citrus and avocado orchards show manure to be efficient in supplying nitrogen to tilled soil.
Studies of tilled and nontilled citrus and avocado orchards show manure to be efficient in supplying nitrogen to tilled soil.

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