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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.12

Noxious weeds threat to forage
December 1955
Volume 9, Number 12

Research articles

Weeds on California rangelands: Medusa head, goatgrass, and Italian thistle, major invading noxious weeds, are serious threat to desirable forage plants
by Jack Major
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Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The grazing capacities of many California rangelands are seriously decreased by weeds—undesirable plants—that crowd out the desirable range plants, change the season of best range use, injure foraging animals, and make even more difficult the establishment of better varieties of forage plants.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The grazing capacities of many California rangelands are seriously decreased by weeds—undesirable plants—that crowd out the desirable range plants, change the season of best range use, injure foraging animals, and make even more difficult the establishment of better varieties of forage plants.
Yellow tip of citrus: Application and biuret content of urea affect extent of leaf tip chlorosis
by Winston W. Jones, T. W. Embleton, George E. Goodall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Yellow tip—a chlorosis of the tips of citrus leaves—results either from foliage sprays or from soil applications of urea containing an excess of biuret.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Yellow tip—a chlorosis of the tips of citrus leaves—results either from foliage sprays or from soil applications of urea containing an excess of biuret.
Fungi on spotted alfalfa aphid: Discovery of fungus-killed aphids in field infestations may lead to biological control by means of natural disease
by Irvin M. Hall, Everett J. Dietrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Epizootics—corresponding to disease epidemics among humans—almost wiped out the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in some fields in the Del Mar Valley of San Diego County during the late summer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Epizootics—corresponding to disease epidemics among humans—almost wiped out the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in some fields in the Del Mar Valley of San Diego County during the late summer.
Fall planted strawberry plants: Experiments indicate freshly dug mature plants will give satisfactory production the following year in certain areas
by Victor Voth, R. S. Bringhurst, David Van Hook, E. L. Kendall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety dug from nursery beds in Tehama County in late November 1954 have yielded two thirds of a full crop during 1955 in San Diego plantings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety dug from nursery beds in Tehama County in late November 1954 have yielded two thirds of a full crop during 1955 in San Diego plantings.
Machine harvesting of olives: Average of 94.6% of the fruit removed from Mission olive trees in tests with boom-type shaker and catching frame
by Lloyd H. Lamouria, H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests conducted during the 1954 season showed that 93% of green, pickling olive fruits can be mechanically removed from Mission trees early in November. A higher harvest percentage resulted with the more mature oil fruit during January and February.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests conducted during the 1954 season showed that 93% of green, pickling olive fruits can be mechanically removed from Mission trees early in November. A higher harvest percentage resulted with the more mature oil fruit during January and February.
Topworking avocado varieties: Evaluation of more satisfactory varieties at Riverside obtained sooner by topworking than by planting new trees
by M. M. Winslow, Marvin P. Miller, Julius Enderud
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Topworking — or topgrafting — to change varieties found unsatisfactory for growing in the avocado orchard at Riverside is used instead of planting a new young tree because a topworked tree comes into production several years sooner and the quality and performance of a new variety can therefore be evaluated earlier. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Topworking — or topgrafting — to change varieties found unsatisfactory for growing in the avocado orchard at Riverside is used instead of planting a new young tree because a topworked tree comes into production several years sooner and the quality and performance of a new variety can therefore be evaluated earlier. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Feed mixtures for milk goats: Feeding trials with milking does compared simple and complex concentrate mixtures as the needed supplements to roughage
by S. W. Mead, Omer Peck, H. H. Cole
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High-milk-producing goats require concentrates in their ration—in addition to roughage—because they are physically incapable of consuming enough bulky food to meet their production requirements.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High-milk-producing goats require concentrates in their ration—in addition to roughage—because they are physically incapable of consuming enough bulky food to meet their production requirements.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.12

Noxious weeds threat to forage
December 1955
Volume 9, Number 12

Research articles

Weeds on California rangelands: Medusa head, goatgrass, and Italian thistle, major invading noxious weeds, are serious threat to desirable forage plants
by Jack Major
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The grazing capacities of many California rangelands are seriously decreased by weeds—undesirable plants—that crowd out the desirable range plants, change the season of best range use, injure foraging animals, and make even more difficult the establishment of better varieties of forage plants.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The grazing capacities of many California rangelands are seriously decreased by weeds—undesirable plants—that crowd out the desirable range plants, change the season of best range use, injure foraging animals, and make even more difficult the establishment of better varieties of forage plants.
Yellow tip of citrus: Application and biuret content of urea affect extent of leaf tip chlorosis
by Winston W. Jones, T. W. Embleton, George E. Goodall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Yellow tip—a chlorosis of the tips of citrus leaves—results either from foliage sprays or from soil applications of urea containing an excess of biuret.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Yellow tip—a chlorosis of the tips of citrus leaves—results either from foliage sprays or from soil applications of urea containing an excess of biuret.
Fungi on spotted alfalfa aphid: Discovery of fungus-killed aphids in field infestations may lead to biological control by means of natural disease
by Irvin M. Hall, Everett J. Dietrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Epizootics—corresponding to disease epidemics among humans—almost wiped out the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in some fields in the Del Mar Valley of San Diego County during the late summer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Epizootics—corresponding to disease epidemics among humans—almost wiped out the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in some fields in the Del Mar Valley of San Diego County during the late summer.
Fall planted strawberry plants: Experiments indicate freshly dug mature plants will give satisfactory production the following year in certain areas
by Victor Voth, R. S. Bringhurst, David Van Hook, E. L. Kendall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety dug from nursery beds in Tehama County in late November 1954 have yielded two thirds of a full crop during 1955 in San Diego plantings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety dug from nursery beds in Tehama County in late November 1954 have yielded two thirds of a full crop during 1955 in San Diego plantings.
Machine harvesting of olives: Average of 94.6% of the fruit removed from Mission olive trees in tests with boom-type shaker and catching frame
by Lloyd H. Lamouria, H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests conducted during the 1954 season showed that 93% of green, pickling olive fruits can be mechanically removed from Mission trees early in November. A higher harvest percentage resulted with the more mature oil fruit during January and February.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests conducted during the 1954 season showed that 93% of green, pickling olive fruits can be mechanically removed from Mission trees early in November. A higher harvest percentage resulted with the more mature oil fruit during January and February.
Topworking avocado varieties: Evaluation of more satisfactory varieties at Riverside obtained sooner by topworking than by planting new trees
by M. M. Winslow, Marvin P. Miller, Julius Enderud
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Topworking — or topgrafting — to change varieties found unsatisfactory for growing in the avocado orchard at Riverside is used instead of planting a new young tree because a topworked tree comes into production several years sooner and the quality and performance of a new variety can therefore be evaluated earlier. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Topworking — or topgrafting — to change varieties found unsatisfactory for growing in the avocado orchard at Riverside is used instead of planting a new young tree because a topworked tree comes into production several years sooner and the quality and performance of a new variety can therefore be evaluated earlier. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Feed mixtures for milk goats: Feeding trials with milking does compared simple and complex concentrate mixtures as the needed supplements to roughage
by S. W. Mead, Omer Peck, H. H. Cole
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High-milk-producing goats require concentrates in their ration—in addition to roughage—because they are physically incapable of consuming enough bulky food to meet their production requirements.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High-milk-producing goats require concentrates in their ration—in addition to roughage—because they are physically incapable of consuming enough bulky food to meet their production requirements.

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