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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.11

Cause of fall-outs during irrigation studied
November 1955
Volume 9, Number 11

Research articles

Effect of feed on beef quality: Only minor differences in tenderness, juiciness, flavor, found in beef from corn-fed, barley-fed, stilbestrol-treated steers
by Marion Simone, Floyd Carroll, Elly Hinreiner, M. T. Clegg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The claim that West Coast grain-fed beef is inferior in quality to eastern corn-fed beef is not supported by experimental evidence.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The claim that West Coast grain-fed beef is inferior in quality to eastern corn-fed beef is not supported by experimental evidence.
Cling peach cannery losses: Pilot plant tests with equipment designed to minimize losses in pitting and peeling operations indicate reduction in costs
by Jerry Foytik, Sherman Leonard, B. S. Luh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cannery losses during the pitting and peeling of cling peaches substantially lessen the volume of fruit reaching the can. Reducing those losses would increase the canner's case yield per ton—a greater pack from a given quantity of peaches—and cannery costs could be reduced.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cannery losses during the pitting and peeling of cling peaches substantially lessen the volume of fruit reaching the can. Reducing those losses would increase the canner's case yield per ton—a greater pack from a given quantity of peaches—and cannery costs could be reduced.
Sinkholes in irrigated fields: Soil-covered, debris-filled channels of former streams may be one cause of fall-outs during irrigation in certain areas
by James C. Marr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sinkholes—crater-like openings, sometimes as big as 10′ to 15′ across and 10′ to 12′ deep—that suddenly appear in fields during irrigation not only waste water and make farming difficult but—most serious—are a hazard to machinery and operators.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sinkholes—crater-like openings, sometimes as big as 10′ to 15′ across and 10′ to 12′ deep—that suddenly appear in fields during irrigation not only waste water and make farming difficult but—most serious—are a hazard to machinery and operators.
Sloping seedbeds: Soil salts minimized in germination zone by bed shaped to allow later cultivation
by Leon Bernstein, Robert S. Ayers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sloping seedbeds—to minimize the soil salinity hazard to germinating seeds—have been designed to permit conversion to normal flat-topped beds after the seedlings are established.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sloping seedbeds—to minimize the soil salinity hazard to germinating seeds—have been designed to permit conversion to normal flat-topped beds after the seedlings are established.
Small ditch seepage controlled: Increasing production demands, costs, and water shortages require efficient water use by operators of irrigated farms
by V. H. Scott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Good irrigation management includes minimizing water losses from farm ditches and reservoirs.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Good irrigation management includes minimizing water losses from farm ditches and reservoirs.
Control of nematode on cotton: Investigations indicate preplanting fumigation of cotton land effective treatment for control of root-knot nematode
by M. W. Allen, Vernon Burton, Alan George
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton root-knot nematode—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita—an be controlled by crop rotation, by summer fallow, by a combination of these two practices, or by preplanting fumigation of infested soil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton root-knot nematode—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita—an be controlled by crop rotation, by summer fallow, by a combination of these two practices, or by preplanting fumigation of infested soil.
Lemon on troyer citrange root: Bud-union and rootstock disorder of Troyer citrange with Eureka lemon tops under study in effort to identify cause
by L. G. Weathers, E. C. Calavan, J. M. Wallace, D. W. Christiansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A serious disorder in trees of Eureka lemon on Troyer citrange—a hybrid of the trifoliate orange and the navel orange—rootstock was discovered in 1954 when all the Eureka tops in one of the experimental plots in Ventura County turned yellow, set a heavy crop of fruit, and declined markedly.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A serious disorder in trees of Eureka lemon on Troyer citrange—a hybrid of the trifoliate orange and the navel orange—rootstock was discovered in 1954 when all the Eureka tops in one of the experimental plots in Ventura County turned yellow, set a heavy crop of fruit, and declined markedly.
Soil temperature and citrus: Low soil temperature contributes to low number of roots under citrus trees in some areas of southern California
by C. P. North, A. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Low soil temperatures—causing low root temperatures—induced foliage wilt in glasshouse experiments with several citrus species on various rootstocks. At soil temperatures ranging from 48F to 62F and with plenty of moisture available, the foliage—especially succulent new growth—wilted, but plants having heat supplied to the roots did not wilt.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Low soil temperatures—causing low root temperatures—induced foliage wilt in glasshouse experiments with several citrus species on various rootstocks. At soil temperatures ranging from 48F to 62F and with plenty of moisture available, the foliage—especially succulent new growth—wilted, but plants having heat supplied to the roots did not wilt.
Grass-legume band seeding: Plant counts compare broadcasting of forage seed mixture and drilling with placed fertilizer after control burn on range
by C. F. Walker, B. L. Kay
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Establishment of productive legumes and grasses has been a primary goal in an experiment in band seeding forage plants on control burned land in the Cleveland National Forest in San Diego County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Establishment of productive legumes and grasses has been a primary goal in an experiment in band seeding forage plants on control burned land in the Cleveland National Forest in San Diego County.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.11

Cause of fall-outs during irrigation studied
November 1955
Volume 9, Number 11

Research articles

Effect of feed on beef quality: Only minor differences in tenderness, juiciness, flavor, found in beef from corn-fed, barley-fed, stilbestrol-treated steers
by Marion Simone, Floyd Carroll, Elly Hinreiner, M. T. Clegg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The claim that West Coast grain-fed beef is inferior in quality to eastern corn-fed beef is not supported by experimental evidence.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The claim that West Coast grain-fed beef is inferior in quality to eastern corn-fed beef is not supported by experimental evidence.
Cling peach cannery losses: Pilot plant tests with equipment designed to minimize losses in pitting and peeling operations indicate reduction in costs
by Jerry Foytik, Sherman Leonard, B. S. Luh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cannery losses during the pitting and peeling of cling peaches substantially lessen the volume of fruit reaching the can. Reducing those losses would increase the canner's case yield per ton—a greater pack from a given quantity of peaches—and cannery costs could be reduced.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cannery losses during the pitting and peeling of cling peaches substantially lessen the volume of fruit reaching the can. Reducing those losses would increase the canner's case yield per ton—a greater pack from a given quantity of peaches—and cannery costs could be reduced.
Sinkholes in irrigated fields: Soil-covered, debris-filled channels of former streams may be one cause of fall-outs during irrigation in certain areas
by James C. Marr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sinkholes—crater-like openings, sometimes as big as 10′ to 15′ across and 10′ to 12′ deep—that suddenly appear in fields during irrigation not only waste water and make farming difficult but—most serious—are a hazard to machinery and operators.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sinkholes—crater-like openings, sometimes as big as 10′ to 15′ across and 10′ to 12′ deep—that suddenly appear in fields during irrigation not only waste water and make farming difficult but—most serious—are a hazard to machinery and operators.
Sloping seedbeds: Soil salts minimized in germination zone by bed shaped to allow later cultivation
by Leon Bernstein, Robert S. Ayers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sloping seedbeds—to minimize the soil salinity hazard to germinating seeds—have been designed to permit conversion to normal flat-topped beds after the seedlings are established.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sloping seedbeds—to minimize the soil salinity hazard to germinating seeds—have been designed to permit conversion to normal flat-topped beds after the seedlings are established.
Small ditch seepage controlled: Increasing production demands, costs, and water shortages require efficient water use by operators of irrigated farms
by V. H. Scott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Good irrigation management includes minimizing water losses from farm ditches and reservoirs.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Good irrigation management includes minimizing water losses from farm ditches and reservoirs.
Control of nematode on cotton: Investigations indicate preplanting fumigation of cotton land effective treatment for control of root-knot nematode
by M. W. Allen, Vernon Burton, Alan George
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton root-knot nematode—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita—an be controlled by crop rotation, by summer fallow, by a combination of these two practices, or by preplanting fumigation of infested soil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton root-knot nematode—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita—an be controlled by crop rotation, by summer fallow, by a combination of these two practices, or by preplanting fumigation of infested soil.
Lemon on troyer citrange root: Bud-union and rootstock disorder of Troyer citrange with Eureka lemon tops under study in effort to identify cause
by L. G. Weathers, E. C. Calavan, J. M. Wallace, D. W. Christiansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A serious disorder in trees of Eureka lemon on Troyer citrange—a hybrid of the trifoliate orange and the navel orange—rootstock was discovered in 1954 when all the Eureka tops in one of the experimental plots in Ventura County turned yellow, set a heavy crop of fruit, and declined markedly.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A serious disorder in trees of Eureka lemon on Troyer citrange—a hybrid of the trifoliate orange and the navel orange—rootstock was discovered in 1954 when all the Eureka tops in one of the experimental plots in Ventura County turned yellow, set a heavy crop of fruit, and declined markedly.
Soil temperature and citrus: Low soil temperature contributes to low number of roots under citrus trees in some areas of southern California
by C. P. North, A. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Low soil temperatures—causing low root temperatures—induced foliage wilt in glasshouse experiments with several citrus species on various rootstocks. At soil temperatures ranging from 48F to 62F and with plenty of moisture available, the foliage—especially succulent new growth—wilted, but plants having heat supplied to the roots did not wilt.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Low soil temperatures—causing low root temperatures—induced foliage wilt in glasshouse experiments with several citrus species on various rootstocks. At soil temperatures ranging from 48F to 62F and with plenty of moisture available, the foliage—especially succulent new growth—wilted, but plants having heat supplied to the roots did not wilt.
Grass-legume band seeding: Plant counts compare broadcasting of forage seed mixture and drilling with placed fertilizer after control burn on range
by C. F. Walker, B. L. Kay
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Establishment of productive legumes and grasses has been a primary goal in an experiment in band seeding forage plants on control burned land in the Cleveland National Forest in San Diego County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Establishment of productive legumes and grasses has been a primary goal in an experiment in band seeding forage plants on control burned land in the Cleveland National Forest in San Diego County.

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