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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.10

Bee experiments in avocado flower pollination
October 1955
Volume 9, Number 10

Research articles

Acreage controls in California: Cotton growers' use of diverted acreage has direct and indirect effects on state's agricultural production pattern
by Trimble R. Hedges
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton acreage in California has dropped from 1.34 million acres in 1953 to 883 thousand acres in 1954—approximately 34%—with a further cut in 1955 to 56% of that in 1953.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton acreage in California has dropped from 1.34 million acres in 1953 to 883 thousand acres in 1954—approximately 34%—with a further cut in 1955 to 56% of that in 1953.
High quality dehydrated meats: Dehydration by freeze-drying method results in products with color, flavor, and food value characteristics of fresh meats
by A. L. Tappel, L. W. Regier, G. F. Stewart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: All the essential properties of fresh meat—color, flavor, and nutrient content—are in the rehydrated product of freeze-drying.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: All the essential properties of fresh meat—color, flavor, and nutrient content—are in the rehydrated product of freeze-drying.
Dual cycle of avocado flowers: Study of the continuous dual opening cycle of the avocado flower shows need of large flying insects for pollination
by Peter A. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dual opening cycle of the avocado flower directly influences effective pollination and fruit setting—necessary steps—in developing useful hybrids by plant breeding.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dual opening cycle of the avocado flower directly influences effective pollination and fruit setting—necessary steps—in developing useful hybrids by plant breeding.
Lima bean tolerant to stem rot: Strain of large seeded lima resistant to stem disease offers possible transference of resistance to commercial varieties
by J. B. Kendrick, R. W. Allard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Basal stem rot of the lima bean in California is a destructive disease.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Basal stem rot of the lima bean in California is a destructive disease.
Electrical tests on nematodes: Results of investigations with high-voltage, nonthermal electrical treatments for control of root-knot nematodes
by Bert Lear, F. C. Jacob
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Electrical treatments for control of root-knot nematodes seem impractical for field use, according to results of limited laboratory experiments at Davis.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Electrical treatments for control of root-knot nematodes seem impractical for field use, according to results of limited laboratory experiments at Davis.
Morning-glory control sprays: Yields of flower seed increased in experiments with various spray materials for control of weed pest costly to growers
by Jack L. Bivins, B. Lennart Johnson, William A. Harvey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Excellent control of morning-glory—in flower seed plantings in Santa Barbara County—was achieved in test plots sprayed with MCP and 2,4-D.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Excellent control of morning-glory—in flower seed plantings in Santa Barbara County—was achieved in test plots sprayed with MCP and 2,4-D.
Walnut branch wilt: Reduction of disease in four-year experiment in Tulare County orchard
by J. H. Foott, A. H. Hendrickson, E. E. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Branch wilt—a destructive fungus disease of English walnuts in California—may be reduced by relatively simple changes in cultural practices. These changes involve: 1, removing all diseased branches from the tree each year; 2, fertilizing soil with a nitrogenous fertilizer; and 3, providing adequate soil moisture by irrigation throughout the growing season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Branch wilt—a destructive fungus disease of English walnuts in California—may be reduced by relatively simple changes in cultural practices. These changes involve: 1, removing all diseased branches from the tree each year; 2, fertilizing soil with a nitrogenous fertilizer; and 3, providing adequate soil moisture by irrigation throughout the growing season.
Reseeding forage after burns: Tests show seedling growth is best when forage is seeded in areas of white ash left by burns producing intense heat
by Eldon F. Azevedo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heavy growth of forage—seeded after a brush burn—on foothill ranges in Butte County was particularly noticeable in the areas covered by white ash at the time of reseeding.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heavy growth of forage—seeded after a brush burn—on foothill ranges in Butte County was particularly noticeable in the areas covered by white ash at the time of reseeding.
Rice acreage may be cut in '56: Large carry-over of rice supply into 1955–56 marketing year plus 1955 crop creates special hazard for California growers
by Gordon A. Rowe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The long-run outlook for marketing California rice appears to be good, but the short-run outlook is anything but good.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The long-run outlook for marketing California rice appears to be good, but the short-run outlook is anything but good.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.10

Bee experiments in avocado flower pollination
October 1955
Volume 9, Number 10

Research articles

Acreage controls in California: Cotton growers' use of diverted acreage has direct and indirect effects on state's agricultural production pattern
by Trimble R. Hedges
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton acreage in California has dropped from 1.34 million acres in 1953 to 883 thousand acres in 1954—approximately 34%—with a further cut in 1955 to 56% of that in 1953.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton acreage in California has dropped from 1.34 million acres in 1953 to 883 thousand acres in 1954—approximately 34%—with a further cut in 1955 to 56% of that in 1953.
High quality dehydrated meats: Dehydration by freeze-drying method results in products with color, flavor, and food value characteristics of fresh meats
by A. L. Tappel, L. W. Regier, G. F. Stewart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: All the essential properties of fresh meat—color, flavor, and nutrient content—are in the rehydrated product of freeze-drying.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: All the essential properties of fresh meat—color, flavor, and nutrient content—are in the rehydrated product of freeze-drying.
Dual cycle of avocado flowers: Study of the continuous dual opening cycle of the avocado flower shows need of large flying insects for pollination
by Peter A. Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dual opening cycle of the avocado flower directly influences effective pollination and fruit setting—necessary steps—in developing useful hybrids by plant breeding.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dual opening cycle of the avocado flower directly influences effective pollination and fruit setting—necessary steps—in developing useful hybrids by plant breeding.
Lima bean tolerant to stem rot: Strain of large seeded lima resistant to stem disease offers possible transference of resistance to commercial varieties
by J. B. Kendrick, R. W. Allard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Basal stem rot of the lima bean in California is a destructive disease.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Basal stem rot of the lima bean in California is a destructive disease.
Electrical tests on nematodes: Results of investigations with high-voltage, nonthermal electrical treatments for control of root-knot nematodes
by Bert Lear, F. C. Jacob
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Electrical treatments for control of root-knot nematodes seem impractical for field use, according to results of limited laboratory experiments at Davis.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Electrical treatments for control of root-knot nematodes seem impractical for field use, according to results of limited laboratory experiments at Davis.
Morning-glory control sprays: Yields of flower seed increased in experiments with various spray materials for control of weed pest costly to growers
by Jack L. Bivins, B. Lennart Johnson, William A. Harvey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Excellent control of morning-glory—in flower seed plantings in Santa Barbara County—was achieved in test plots sprayed with MCP and 2,4-D.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Excellent control of morning-glory—in flower seed plantings in Santa Barbara County—was achieved in test plots sprayed with MCP and 2,4-D.
Walnut branch wilt: Reduction of disease in four-year experiment in Tulare County orchard
by J. H. Foott, A. H. Hendrickson, E. E. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Branch wilt—a destructive fungus disease of English walnuts in California—may be reduced by relatively simple changes in cultural practices. These changes involve: 1, removing all diseased branches from the tree each year; 2, fertilizing soil with a nitrogenous fertilizer; and 3, providing adequate soil moisture by irrigation throughout the growing season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Branch wilt—a destructive fungus disease of English walnuts in California—may be reduced by relatively simple changes in cultural practices. These changes involve: 1, removing all diseased branches from the tree each year; 2, fertilizing soil with a nitrogenous fertilizer; and 3, providing adequate soil moisture by irrigation throughout the growing season.
Reseeding forage after burns: Tests show seedling growth is best when forage is seeded in areas of white ash left by burns producing intense heat
by Eldon F. Azevedo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heavy growth of forage—seeded after a brush burn—on foothill ranges in Butte County was particularly noticeable in the areas covered by white ash at the time of reseeding.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heavy growth of forage—seeded after a brush burn—on foothill ranges in Butte County was particularly noticeable in the areas covered by white ash at the time of reseeding.
Rice acreage may be cut in '56: Large carry-over of rice supply into 1955–56 marketing year plus 1955 crop creates special hazard for California growers
by Gordon A. Rowe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The long-run outlook for marketing California rice appears to be good, but the short-run outlook is anything but good.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The long-run outlook for marketing California rice appears to be good, but the short-run outlook is anything but good.

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