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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.9

Breakdown in double-flowered stock
September 1955
Volume 9, Number 9

Research articles

Use of pest control chemicals: Public law No. 518 effective July 22, 1955, of concern to all growers, shippers using pesticide chemicals on farm products
by G. E. Carman, J. E. Swift
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Miller Amendment to the Pure Food Law—the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938—became law on July 22, 1954, with provision that its enforcement with respect to some of the new pesticide materials be delayed one year. More recently, extensions have been granted in specific instances, but the law will become fully effective October 31, 1955, at the end of the 1955 growing season. However, all other requirements of the amended law are now in effect and subject to enforcement.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Miller Amendment to the Pure Food Law—the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938—became law on July 22, 1954, with provision that its enforcement with respect to some of the new pesticide materials be delayed one year. More recently, extensions have been granted in specific instances, but the law will become fully effective October 31, 1955, at the end of the 1955 growing season. However, all other requirements of the amended law are now in effect and subject to enforcement.
Minor nutrients of citrus: Effects of phosphorus fertilization on the minor element nutrition of citrus studied with three types of soil series
by Frank T. Bingham, James P. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accumulation of large phosphorus reserves in avocado and citrus soils will reduce the availability of zinc and copper in many California soils to the point of deficiency.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accumulation of large phosphorus reserves in avocado and citrus soils will reduce the availability of zinc and copper in many California soils to the point of deficiency.
New soil fumigant: Increased growth of crop plants with weed killer of low toxicity to humans
by Jack L. Bivins, Anton M. Kofranek
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new soil fumigant—vapam—proved to be an effective weed killer in column stocks—Matthiola incana—in Santa Barbara County tests conducted during the fall and winter of 1954–55.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new soil fumigant—vapam—proved to be an effective weed killer in column stocks—Matthiola incana—in Santa Barbara County tests conducted during the fall and winter of 1954–55.
Double-flowered column stocks: Genetic crossover responsible for breakdown in percentage of doubles produced by succeeding generations of parent variety
by B. Lennart Johnson, David Barnhart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 20% of the cost of field production of column stocks—Matthiola incana—as cut flowers is for seed because of the techniques required to obtain seed that will produce a satisfactory percentage of double flowers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 20% of the cost of field production of column stocks—Matthiola incana—as cut flowers is for seed because of the techniques required to obtain seed that will produce a satisfactory percentage of double flowers.
Verticillium wilt resistance: Strawberries resistant to verticillium wilt also show resistance to powdery mildew in plant disease studies
by Stephen Wilhelm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Resistance to the Verticillium disease of strawberry occurs in a few varieties such as Sierra, Blakemore, and Marshall, in some breeding stocks, and in some forms of Fragaria chiloensis, one of the progenitors of the present-day large-fruited strawberry.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Resistance to the Verticillium disease of strawberry occurs in a few varieties such as Sierra, Blakemore, and Marshall, in some breeding stocks, and in some forms of Fragaria chiloensis, one of the progenitors of the present-day large-fruited strawberry.
Almond varieties on plum roots: Plum rootstocks being tested for suitability to almonds in wet areas or in soils infected with oak root fungus
by Carl J. Hansen, Dale E. Kester
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond and peach seedlings are the rootstocks most generally used for the almond and—usually—they are satisfactory except in heavy, wet soils or in areas infected with oak root fungus.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond and peach seedlings are the rootstocks most generally used for the almond and—usually—they are satisfactory except in heavy, wet soils or in areas infected with oak root fungus.
Effective use of living shade: Studies show how selection and location of trees and shrubs can reduce extremes of summer temperatures in living areas
by Robert B. Deering
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dense shade from trees can reduce room temperature in houses as much as 20F.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dense shade from trees can reduce room temperature in houses as much as 20F.
Citrus collection for research: Citrus relatives, species, varieties, strains, and hybrids provide materials for research on problems of citriculture
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant source materials for research on citrus problems are available—in one of the world's most extensive citrus variety collections—at the Citrus Experiment Station at Riverside.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant source materials for research on citrus problems are available—in one of the world's most extensive citrus variety collections—at the Citrus Experiment Station at Riverside.
Potassium and lemon fruit size: Larger sizes obtained in soil cultures when potassium was increased and calcium decreased in laboratory experiments
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests on the effect of potassium and calcium soil fertilization on lemon fruit size—made when the fruit was in the silver stage of maturity—showed that the potassium-calcium ratio in the nutrient was effective in bringing about a marked response in the potassium and calcium content in the peel and pulp. Comparative results obtained with lemon flowers also indicated that the period of flowering and fruit setting can be of considerable importance in setting the pattern of mineral nutrition to be followed in the fruit until maturation occurs.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests on the effect of potassium and calcium soil fertilization on lemon fruit size—made when the fruit was in the silver stage of maturity—showed that the potassium-calcium ratio in the nutrient was effective in bringing about a marked response in the potassium and calcium content in the peel and pulp. Comparative results obtained with lemon flowers also indicated that the period of flowering and fruit setting can be of considerable importance in setting the pattern of mineral nutrition to be followed in the fruit until maturation occurs.
New mite predators: Four species from Guatemala show promise in southern California.
by C. A. Fleschner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Guatemalan Stethorus—a small, black, lady beetle mite predator—is being propagated by the thousand in the insectary at Riverside for release in southern California avocado and citrus groves.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Guatemalan Stethorus—a small, black, lady beetle mite predator—is being propagated by the thousand in the insectary at Riverside for release in southern California avocado and citrus groves.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.9

Breakdown in double-flowered stock
September 1955
Volume 9, Number 9

Research articles

Use of pest control chemicals: Public law No. 518 effective July 22, 1955, of concern to all growers, shippers using pesticide chemicals on farm products
by G. E. Carman, J. E. Swift
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Miller Amendment to the Pure Food Law—the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938—became law on July 22, 1954, with provision that its enforcement with respect to some of the new pesticide materials be delayed one year. More recently, extensions have been granted in specific instances, but the law will become fully effective October 31, 1955, at the end of the 1955 growing season. However, all other requirements of the amended law are now in effect and subject to enforcement.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Miller Amendment to the Pure Food Law—the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938—became law on July 22, 1954, with provision that its enforcement with respect to some of the new pesticide materials be delayed one year. More recently, extensions have been granted in specific instances, but the law will become fully effective October 31, 1955, at the end of the 1955 growing season. However, all other requirements of the amended law are now in effect and subject to enforcement.
Minor nutrients of citrus: Effects of phosphorus fertilization on the minor element nutrition of citrus studied with three types of soil series
by Frank T. Bingham, James P. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accumulation of large phosphorus reserves in avocado and citrus soils will reduce the availability of zinc and copper in many California soils to the point of deficiency.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accumulation of large phosphorus reserves in avocado and citrus soils will reduce the availability of zinc and copper in many California soils to the point of deficiency.
New soil fumigant: Increased growth of crop plants with weed killer of low toxicity to humans
by Jack L. Bivins, Anton M. Kofranek
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new soil fumigant—vapam—proved to be an effective weed killer in column stocks—Matthiola incana—in Santa Barbara County tests conducted during the fall and winter of 1954–55.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A new soil fumigant—vapam—proved to be an effective weed killer in column stocks—Matthiola incana—in Santa Barbara County tests conducted during the fall and winter of 1954–55.
Double-flowered column stocks: Genetic crossover responsible for breakdown in percentage of doubles produced by succeeding generations of parent variety
by B. Lennart Johnson, David Barnhart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 20% of the cost of field production of column stocks—Matthiola incana—as cut flowers is for seed because of the techniques required to obtain seed that will produce a satisfactory percentage of double flowers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 20% of the cost of field production of column stocks—Matthiola incana—as cut flowers is for seed because of the techniques required to obtain seed that will produce a satisfactory percentage of double flowers.
Verticillium wilt resistance: Strawberries resistant to verticillium wilt also show resistance to powdery mildew in plant disease studies
by Stephen Wilhelm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Resistance to the Verticillium disease of strawberry occurs in a few varieties such as Sierra, Blakemore, and Marshall, in some breeding stocks, and in some forms of Fragaria chiloensis, one of the progenitors of the present-day large-fruited strawberry.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Resistance to the Verticillium disease of strawberry occurs in a few varieties such as Sierra, Blakemore, and Marshall, in some breeding stocks, and in some forms of Fragaria chiloensis, one of the progenitors of the present-day large-fruited strawberry.
Almond varieties on plum roots: Plum rootstocks being tested for suitability to almonds in wet areas or in soils infected with oak root fungus
by Carl J. Hansen, Dale E. Kester
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond and peach seedlings are the rootstocks most generally used for the almond and—usually—they are satisfactory except in heavy, wet soils or in areas infected with oak root fungus.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond and peach seedlings are the rootstocks most generally used for the almond and—usually—they are satisfactory except in heavy, wet soils or in areas infected with oak root fungus.
Effective use of living shade: Studies show how selection and location of trees and shrubs can reduce extremes of summer temperatures in living areas
by Robert B. Deering
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dense shade from trees can reduce room temperature in houses as much as 20F.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dense shade from trees can reduce room temperature in houses as much as 20F.
Citrus collection for research: Citrus relatives, species, varieties, strains, and hybrids provide materials for research on problems of citriculture
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant source materials for research on citrus problems are available—in one of the world's most extensive citrus variety collections—at the Citrus Experiment Station at Riverside.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant source materials for research on citrus problems are available—in one of the world's most extensive citrus variety collections—at the Citrus Experiment Station at Riverside.
Potassium and lemon fruit size: Larger sizes obtained in soil cultures when potassium was increased and calcium decreased in laboratory experiments
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests on the effect of potassium and calcium soil fertilization on lemon fruit size—made when the fruit was in the silver stage of maturity—showed that the potassium-calcium ratio in the nutrient was effective in bringing about a marked response in the potassium and calcium content in the peel and pulp. Comparative results obtained with lemon flowers also indicated that the period of flowering and fruit setting can be of considerable importance in setting the pattern of mineral nutrition to be followed in the fruit until maturation occurs.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests on the effect of potassium and calcium soil fertilization on lemon fruit size—made when the fruit was in the silver stage of maturity—showed that the potassium-calcium ratio in the nutrient was effective in bringing about a marked response in the potassium and calcium content in the peel and pulp. Comparative results obtained with lemon flowers also indicated that the period of flowering and fruit setting can be of considerable importance in setting the pattern of mineral nutrition to be followed in the fruit until maturation occurs.
New mite predators: Four species from Guatemala show promise in southern California.
by C. A. Fleschner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Guatemalan Stethorus—a small, black, lady beetle mite predator—is being propagated by the thousand in the insectary at Riverside for release in southern California avocado and citrus groves.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Guatemalan Stethorus—a small, black, lady beetle mite predator—is being propagated by the thousand in the insectary at Riverside for release in southern California avocado and citrus groves.

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