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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.8

Parasitism of grape leaf skeletonizer
August 1955
Volume 9, Number 8

Research articles

Frost protection in almonds: Wind machine studies in 1955 frost season indicate protection in mature almond orchards below that obtained in citrus
by D. G. Rhoades, F. A. Brooks, A. S. Leonard, H. B. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Chico area, almond orchards need frost protection—on the average—six nights a year, two years out of three, with one or two of those nights needing 2F or 3F of protection. Late frosts—in April—generally occur only once in eight years. This year there were about one third more frosty nights than usual, and several of those nights occurred in April. This made it possible to conduct a good series of wind machine tests both when the trees were relatively bare and when they had considerable foliage.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Chico area, almond orchards need frost protection—on the average—six nights a year, two years out of three, with one or two of those nights needing 2F or 3F of protection. Late frosts—in April—generally occur only once in eight years. This year there were about one third more frosty nights than usual, and several of those nights occurred in April. This made it possible to conduct a good series of wind machine tests both when the trees were relatively bare and when they had considerable foliage.
Small-nut almonds: Progress in development of varieties consistently producing small sized nuts
by Dale E. Kester, Robert W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The California almond industry is faced with the problem of supplying relatively large quantities of small sized almonds for candy bar manufacture. Present varieties do not consistently produce sufficient amounts of the required sizes—and the supply fluctuates from year to year.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The California almond industry is faced with the problem of supplying relatively large quantities of small sized almonds for candy bar manufacture. Present varieties do not consistently produce sufficient amounts of the required sizes—and the supply fluctuates from year to year.
Western grape leaf skeletonizer: 1954 biological control program indicates parasitism plus virus disease registering important reduction of vineyard pest
by Owen J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two insect parasites, Apanteles harrisinue Mues.—previously called sp. “A”—and Sturmia harrisinae Coq., together with an unnamed granulosis virus, have attained major importance—on the basis of field performance—as natural enemies of the grape leaf skeletonizer in San Diego County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two insect parasites, Apanteles harrisinue Mues.—previously called sp. “A”—and Sturmia harrisinae Coq., together with an unnamed granulosis virus, have attained major importance—on the basis of field performance—as natural enemies of the grape leaf skeletonizer in San Diego County.
California red scale control: Natural enemies can keep pest under control in citrus groves when given help and in areas with favorable climate
by Paul DeBach, John H. Landi, Ernest B. White
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Four parasites of the California red scale—Aphytis chrysomphali (Mercet); Aphytis lingnanensis Compere, formerly known as Aphytis “A”; Prospaltella perniciosi Tower, Oriental Strain; and Comperiella bifasciata Comp., Chinese strain—are established in certain citrus areas in southern California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Four parasites of the California red scale—Aphytis chrysomphali (Mercet); Aphytis lingnanensis Compere, formerly known as Aphytis “A”; Prospaltella perniciosi Tower, Oriental Strain; and Comperiella bifasciata Comp., Chinese strain—are established in certain citrus areas in southern California.
Causes of avocado leaf injury: Certain foliage injury often attributed to insect feeding may actually be the result of some physiological disorder
by Walter Ebeling
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ability to distinguish between types of avocado foliage injury caused by different insects and injury from other causes is essential in making evaluations of insecticide treatments.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ability to distinguish between types of avocado foliage injury caused by different insects and injury from other causes is essential in making evaluations of insecticide treatments.
Salt damage to strawberries: Types of water, irrigation system, and soil condition found to influence salt accumulation in strawberry plantings
by J. G. Brown, Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural practices necessary for strawberry production cause salt accumulation—with resulting injury to the plants—in some areas where the irrigation water is generally considered of good quality for most crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural practices necessary for strawberry production cause salt accumulation—with resulting injury to the plants—in some areas where the irrigation water is generally considered of good quality for most crops.
Quality of dried french prunes: Studies on fruit maturity for influence on yield, quality, time-range for most profitable harvest of interior valley prunes
by L. L. Claypool, John Kilbuck
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Color—of the flesh and of the skin—is perhaps the most reliable single index of maturity in French prunes grown in the interior valleys of California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Color—of the flesh and of the skin—is perhaps the most reliable single index of maturity in French prunes grown in the interior valleys of California.
Rangeland forage: Almost trebled by seeding rose clover and use of sulfur-bearing fertilizers
by R. J. Arkley, W. N. Helphinstine, W. A. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Rose clover seeded on ranges in Stanislaus County during the past two years increased forage production 82% and crude protein production 234% on an acre basis.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Rose clover seeded on ranges in Stanislaus County during the past two years increased forage production 82% and crude protein production 234% on an acre basis.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.8

Parasitism of grape leaf skeletonizer
August 1955
Volume 9, Number 8

Research articles

Frost protection in almonds: Wind machine studies in 1955 frost season indicate protection in mature almond orchards below that obtained in citrus
by D. G. Rhoades, F. A. Brooks, A. S. Leonard, H. B. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Chico area, almond orchards need frost protection—on the average—six nights a year, two years out of three, with one or two of those nights needing 2F or 3F of protection. Late frosts—in April—generally occur only once in eight years. This year there were about one third more frosty nights than usual, and several of those nights occurred in April. This made it possible to conduct a good series of wind machine tests both when the trees were relatively bare and when they had considerable foliage.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the Chico area, almond orchards need frost protection—on the average—six nights a year, two years out of three, with one or two of those nights needing 2F or 3F of protection. Late frosts—in April—generally occur only once in eight years. This year there were about one third more frosty nights than usual, and several of those nights occurred in April. This made it possible to conduct a good series of wind machine tests both when the trees were relatively bare and when they had considerable foliage.
Small-nut almonds: Progress in development of varieties consistently producing small sized nuts
by Dale E. Kester, Robert W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The California almond industry is faced with the problem of supplying relatively large quantities of small sized almonds for candy bar manufacture. Present varieties do not consistently produce sufficient amounts of the required sizes—and the supply fluctuates from year to year.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The California almond industry is faced with the problem of supplying relatively large quantities of small sized almonds for candy bar manufacture. Present varieties do not consistently produce sufficient amounts of the required sizes—and the supply fluctuates from year to year.
Western grape leaf skeletonizer: 1954 biological control program indicates parasitism plus virus disease registering important reduction of vineyard pest
by Owen J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two insect parasites, Apanteles harrisinue Mues.—previously called sp. “A”—and Sturmia harrisinae Coq., together with an unnamed granulosis virus, have attained major importance—on the basis of field performance—as natural enemies of the grape leaf skeletonizer in San Diego County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two insect parasites, Apanteles harrisinue Mues.—previously called sp. “A”—and Sturmia harrisinae Coq., together with an unnamed granulosis virus, have attained major importance—on the basis of field performance—as natural enemies of the grape leaf skeletonizer in San Diego County.
California red scale control: Natural enemies can keep pest under control in citrus groves when given help and in areas with favorable climate
by Paul DeBach, John H. Landi, Ernest B. White
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Four parasites of the California red scale—Aphytis chrysomphali (Mercet); Aphytis lingnanensis Compere, formerly known as Aphytis “A”; Prospaltella perniciosi Tower, Oriental Strain; and Comperiella bifasciata Comp., Chinese strain—are established in certain citrus areas in southern California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Four parasites of the California red scale—Aphytis chrysomphali (Mercet); Aphytis lingnanensis Compere, formerly known as Aphytis “A”; Prospaltella perniciosi Tower, Oriental Strain; and Comperiella bifasciata Comp., Chinese strain—are established in certain citrus areas in southern California.
Causes of avocado leaf injury: Certain foliage injury often attributed to insect feeding may actually be the result of some physiological disorder
by Walter Ebeling
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ability to distinguish between types of avocado foliage injury caused by different insects and injury from other causes is essential in making evaluations of insecticide treatments.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ability to distinguish between types of avocado foliage injury caused by different insects and injury from other causes is essential in making evaluations of insecticide treatments.
Salt damage to strawberries: Types of water, irrigation system, and soil condition found to influence salt accumulation in strawberry plantings
by J. G. Brown, Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural practices necessary for strawberry production cause salt accumulation—with resulting injury to the plants—in some areas where the irrigation water is generally considered of good quality for most crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural practices necessary for strawberry production cause salt accumulation—with resulting injury to the plants—in some areas where the irrigation water is generally considered of good quality for most crops.
Quality of dried french prunes: Studies on fruit maturity for influence on yield, quality, time-range for most profitable harvest of interior valley prunes
by L. L. Claypool, John Kilbuck
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Color—of the flesh and of the skin—is perhaps the most reliable single index of maturity in French prunes grown in the interior valleys of California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Color—of the flesh and of the skin—is perhaps the most reliable single index of maturity in French prunes grown in the interior valleys of California.
Rangeland forage: Almost trebled by seeding rose clover and use of sulfur-bearing fertilizers
by R. J. Arkley, W. N. Helphinstine, W. A. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Rose clover seeded on ranges in Stanislaus County during the past two years increased forage production 82% and crude protein production 234% on an acre basis.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Rose clover seeded on ranges in Stanislaus County during the past two years increased forage production 82% and crude protein production 234% on an acre basis.

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