California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.7

Harvesting corn with adapted grain combine
July 1955
Volume 9, Number 7

Research articles

FertiIized pastures: Legumes and perennial grasses respond to split-fertilization in range tests
by R. M. Love, Alfred H. Murphy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Forage production on improved dry-land pastures fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus was increased tenfold over untreated pasture during the mid-winter period of feed shortage, in a recent study with sheep at the Hopland Field Station.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Forage production on improved dry-land pastures fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus was increased tenfold over untreated pasture during the mid-winter period of feed shortage, in a recent study with sheep at the Hopland Field Station.
Yellow clover aphid on alfalfa: Pest not ruinous to state's alfalfa industry but production costs increased by frequent field inspections and treatments
by R. C. Dickson, H. T. Reynolds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: By mid-May 1955 the populations of the yellow clover aphid—Therioaphis trifolii (Monell)—in alfalfa fields in the desert areas of California had dropped off to such an extent that many fields did not require treatment.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: By mid-May 1955 the populations of the yellow clover aphid—Therioaphis trifolii (Monell)—in alfalfa fields in the desert areas of California had dropped off to such an extent that many fields did not require treatment.
Biological control: Natural enemies of aphid in California sought in European, Mid-East countries
by C.P. Clausen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field observations on the yellow clover aphid were made in southern California during the past year to determine the status of the predators that attack the aphid and the presence or absence of internal parasites. No internal parasites were found.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field observations on the yellow clover aphid were made in southern California during the past year to determine the status of the predators that attack the aphid and the presence or absence of internal parasites. No internal parasites were found.
Chemical control: Insecticides when properly applied will give effective commercial control of pest
by H. T. Reynolds, R. C. Dickson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under conditions of high populations, the yellow clover aphid—easy to kill by insecticide applications—is difficult to control because of rapid reinfestation.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under conditions of high populations, the yellow clover aphid—easy to kill by insecticide applications—is difficult to control because of rapid reinfestation.
Resistant plants: Alfalfa variety resistant to aphid attack and adapted to desert areas planned
by E. H. Stanford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Principles of genetics—basic to scientific plant breeding—are to be applied in a project in the Imperial Valley to develop a strain of alfalfa resitant to the yellow clover aphid and adapted to the growing conditions in the desert areas of the southwest.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Principles of genetics—basic to scientific plant breeding—are to be applied in a project in the Imperial Valley to develop a strain of alfalfa resitant to the yellow clover aphid and adapted to the growing conditions in the desert areas of the southwest.
Prune harvest methods, costs: Comparative study made on efficiency of various types of labor-saving equipment used in 1954 prune harvest season
by Arthur Shultis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting 400,000 tons of California's fresh prunes—to make about 160,000 tons of dried prunes—requires an estimated total of 195,000 man-weeks of labor. Peak labor requirement in early September is over 30,000 seasonal workers in addition to family and regular labor.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting 400,000 tons of California's fresh prunes—to make about 160,000 tons of dried prunes—requires an estimated total of 195,000 man-weeks of labor. Peak labor requirement in early September is over 30,000 seasonal workers in addition to family and regular labor.
Effects of irrigation on the growth and yield of cotton: Amounts and timing of applications influence lint grade and staple length
by J. R. Stockton, L. D. Doneen
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effects of irrigation on the growth and yield of cotton: Fruting, defoliation, lodging, boll opening related to available moisture
by V.T. Walhood, B. Counts
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Combine used in corn: Two types of gathering attachments successful in harvesting trials in 1954
by Roy Bainer, J. R. Goss, R. G. Curley, D. G. Smeltzer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An ordinary grain combine—when equipped with either a rasp-bar or angle-bar cylinder—is suited for shelling ear corn under California conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An ordinary grain combine—when equipped with either a rasp-bar or angle-bar cylinder—is suited for shelling ear corn under California conditions.
Field corn pickers: Tests indicate two operational factors have important effect on field losses
by W. N. King, Lloyd Peterson, R. G. Curley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Corn picker field tests made in Kern and Los Angeles counties in 1954 show that ground speed and snapping roll adjustment are the most important factors determining picking losses.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Corn picker field tests made in Kern and Los Angeles counties in 1954 show that ground speed and snapping roll adjustment are the most important factors determining picking losses.
Hybrid corn trials: Effect of summer temperatures on corn maturity in Santa Barbara County
by Harwood L. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Temperature differences may be so great between relatively nearby areas as to cause hybrid corn varieties to perform in widely different ways.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Temperature differences may be so great between relatively nearby areas as to cause hybrid corn varieties to perform in widely different ways.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=9_7

California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.7

Harvesting corn with adapted grain combine
July 1955
Volume 9, Number 7

Research articles

FertiIized pastures: Legumes and perennial grasses respond to split-fertilization in range tests
by R. M. Love, Alfred H. Murphy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Forage production on improved dry-land pastures fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus was increased tenfold over untreated pasture during the mid-winter period of feed shortage, in a recent study with sheep at the Hopland Field Station.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Forage production on improved dry-land pastures fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus was increased tenfold over untreated pasture during the mid-winter period of feed shortage, in a recent study with sheep at the Hopland Field Station.
Yellow clover aphid on alfalfa: Pest not ruinous to state's alfalfa industry but production costs increased by frequent field inspections and treatments
by R. C. Dickson, H. T. Reynolds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: By mid-May 1955 the populations of the yellow clover aphid—Therioaphis trifolii (Monell)—in alfalfa fields in the desert areas of California had dropped off to such an extent that many fields did not require treatment.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: By mid-May 1955 the populations of the yellow clover aphid—Therioaphis trifolii (Monell)—in alfalfa fields in the desert areas of California had dropped off to such an extent that many fields did not require treatment.
Biological control: Natural enemies of aphid in California sought in European, Mid-East countries
by C.P. Clausen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field observations on the yellow clover aphid were made in southern California during the past year to determine the status of the predators that attack the aphid and the presence or absence of internal parasites. No internal parasites were found.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field observations on the yellow clover aphid were made in southern California during the past year to determine the status of the predators that attack the aphid and the presence or absence of internal parasites. No internal parasites were found.
Chemical control: Insecticides when properly applied will give effective commercial control of pest
by H. T. Reynolds, R. C. Dickson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under conditions of high populations, the yellow clover aphid—easy to kill by insecticide applications—is difficult to control because of rapid reinfestation.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under conditions of high populations, the yellow clover aphid—easy to kill by insecticide applications—is difficult to control because of rapid reinfestation.
Resistant plants: Alfalfa variety resistant to aphid attack and adapted to desert areas planned
by E. H. Stanford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Principles of genetics—basic to scientific plant breeding—are to be applied in a project in the Imperial Valley to develop a strain of alfalfa resitant to the yellow clover aphid and adapted to the growing conditions in the desert areas of the southwest.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Principles of genetics—basic to scientific plant breeding—are to be applied in a project in the Imperial Valley to develop a strain of alfalfa resitant to the yellow clover aphid and adapted to the growing conditions in the desert areas of the southwest.
Prune harvest methods, costs: Comparative study made on efficiency of various types of labor-saving equipment used in 1954 prune harvest season
by Arthur Shultis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting 400,000 tons of California's fresh prunes—to make about 160,000 tons of dried prunes—requires an estimated total of 195,000 man-weeks of labor. Peak labor requirement in early September is over 30,000 seasonal workers in addition to family and regular labor.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting 400,000 tons of California's fresh prunes—to make about 160,000 tons of dried prunes—requires an estimated total of 195,000 man-weeks of labor. Peak labor requirement in early September is over 30,000 seasonal workers in addition to family and regular labor.
Effects of irrigation on the growth and yield of cotton: Amounts and timing of applications influence lint grade and staple length
by J. R. Stockton, L. D. Doneen
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effects of irrigation on the growth and yield of cotton: Fruting, defoliation, lodging, boll opening related to available moisture
by V.T. Walhood, B. Counts
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Combine used in corn: Two types of gathering attachments successful in harvesting trials in 1954
by Roy Bainer, J. R. Goss, R. G. Curley, D. G. Smeltzer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An ordinary grain combine—when equipped with either a rasp-bar or angle-bar cylinder—is suited for shelling ear corn under California conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An ordinary grain combine—when equipped with either a rasp-bar or angle-bar cylinder—is suited for shelling ear corn under California conditions.
Field corn pickers: Tests indicate two operational factors have important effect on field losses
by W. N. King, Lloyd Peterson, R. G. Curley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Corn picker field tests made in Kern and Los Angeles counties in 1954 show that ground speed and snapping roll adjustment are the most important factors determining picking losses.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Corn picker field tests made in Kern and Los Angeles counties in 1954 show that ground speed and snapping roll adjustment are the most important factors determining picking losses.
Hybrid corn trials: Effect of summer temperatures on corn maturity in Santa Barbara County
by Harwood L. Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Temperature differences may be so great between relatively nearby areas as to cause hybrid corn varieties to perform in widely different ways.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Temperature differences may be so great between relatively nearby areas as to cause hybrid corn varieties to perform in widely different ways.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/