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FertiIized pastures: Legumes and perennial grasses respond to split-fertilization in range tests

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Authors

R. M. Love, University of California
Alfred H. Murphy, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 9(7):3-3.

Published July 01, 1955

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Abstract

Forage production on improved dry-land pastures fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus was increased tenfold over untreated pasture during the mid-winter period of feed shortage, in a recent study with sheep at the Hopland Field Station.

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Author notes

Donald T. Torell, Assistant Specialist in Animal Husbandry, University of California, Hop-land; W. E. Moon, Senior Laboratory Technician, University of California, Davis; and Raymond A. Evans, Junior Specialist in Agronomy, University of California, Berkeley, cooperated in the studies reported here.

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1194.

FertiIized pastures: Legumes and perennial grasses respond to split-fertilization in range tests

R. M. Love, Alfred H. Murphy
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

FertiIized pastures: Legumes and perennial grasses respond to split-fertilization in range tests

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. M. Love, University of California
Alfred H. Murphy, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 9(7):3-3.

Published July 01, 1955

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Forage production on improved dry-land pastures fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus was increased tenfold over untreated pasture during the mid-winter period of feed shortage, in a recent study with sheep at the Hopland Field Station.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Donald T. Torell, Assistant Specialist in Animal Husbandry, University of California, Hop-land; W. E. Moon, Senior Laboratory Technician, University of California, Davis; and Raymond A. Evans, Junior Specialist in Agronomy, University of California, Berkeley, cooperated in the studies reported here.

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1194.


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