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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.2

Range fertilization and reseeding
February 1956
Volume 10, Number 2

Research articles

Range grazing capacity raised: Program of seeding annual clovers, fertilization and grazing management resulted in improved forage quality and quantity
by William A. Williams, R. Merton Love, John P. Conrad
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A threefold increase in grazing capacity was achieved in a five-year range improvement program involving the seeding of adapted clovers, phosphorus fertilization, and grazing management on over 500 acres. Grazing records and quadrat harvests demonstrate the marked success of the improvement methods.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A threefold increase in grazing capacity was achieved in a five-year range improvement program involving the seeding of adapted clovers, phosphorus fertilization, and grazing management on over 500 acres. Grazing records and quadrat harvests demonstrate the marked success of the improvement methods.
Rapid spread of alfalfa pest: Spotted alfalfa aphid infests about 75% of state's alfalfa acreage within two years after its discovery in California
by Ray F. Smith, John E. Swift, Jack Dibble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The worst pest of alfalfa ever to reach California has spread within two years to 33 alfalfa-producing counties.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The worst pest of alfalfa ever to reach California has spread within two years to 33 alfalfa-producing counties.
Removal of tinder in ponderosa: Prescribed burning of forest brush during the wet season by tested methods effectively reduces hazard of wildfire
by H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dead material in second-growth ponderosa pine is one factor contributing to destructive uncontrolled fires in summer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dead material in second-growth ponderosa pine is one factor contributing to destructive uncontrolled fires in summer.
Red mite on pears: New acaricides included in early spray tests for control of European red mite
by Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Prebloom spray treatment against the overwintering eggs of European red mite on pears reduced populations and prevented an early season build-up. Thus far, Genite-923 is the only material which has given consistent control—at a dosage of 1% pints of 50% emulsion per 100 gallons—combined with lime-sulfur or organic fungicides regularly used for pear scab control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Prebloom spray treatment against the overwintering eggs of European red mite on pears reduced populations and prevented an early season build-up. Thus far, Genite-923 is the only material which has given consistent control—at a dosage of 1% pints of 50% emulsion per 100 gallons—combined with lime-sulfur or organic fungicides regularly used for pear scab control.
Russet on bartletts: Pears from trees treated with copper or streptomycin equally free from russet
by Richard W. Harris, William H. Griggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears from trees in two Mendocino County orchards and one Sacramento Valley orchard that were sprayed or dusted with copper—for blight control—during 1955 were as free from russet as fruit from trees treated with streptomycin.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears from trees in two Mendocino County orchards and one Sacramento Valley orchard that were sprayed or dusted with copper—for blight control—during 1955 were as free from russet as fruit from trees treated with streptomycin.
Codling moth on walnuts in '55: Downward trend in infestations of 1955 in northern California not uniform and need of control treatments in 1956 indicated
by A. E. Michelbacher, Earl Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The codling moth was less destructive—generally—to northern California walnuts in 1955 than in 1954.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The codling moth was less destructive—generally—to northern California walnuts in 1955 than in 1954.
DDT residues on sweet corn: Kernels and cob of corn treated with DDT remain practically free of residues but amounts on plant restrict use as fodder
by Oscar G. Bacon, Wallace R. Erwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Technical DDT at the rate of 4.5 to 12 pounds an acre—depending upon the method and number of applications—is applied to most of California's commercial sweet corn acreage to control the corn earworm.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Technical DDT at the rate of 4.5 to 12 pounds an acre—depending upon the method and number of applications—is applied to most of California's commercial sweet corn acreage to control the corn earworm.
Zinc-deficient crops: Sweet corn, tomatoes, beans, and sugar beets used in tests for zinc deficiency
by John C. Lingle, D. M. Holmberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Zinc sprays produced marked yield increases in certain annual crops in so-called sick-spots in Yolo County in 1955.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Zinc sprays produced marked yield increases in certain annual crops in so-called sick-spots in Yolo County in 1955.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.2

Range fertilization and reseeding
February 1956
Volume 10, Number 2

Research articles

Range grazing capacity raised: Program of seeding annual clovers, fertilization and grazing management resulted in improved forage quality and quantity
by William A. Williams, R. Merton Love, John P. Conrad
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A threefold increase in grazing capacity was achieved in a five-year range improvement program involving the seeding of adapted clovers, phosphorus fertilization, and grazing management on over 500 acres. Grazing records and quadrat harvests demonstrate the marked success of the improvement methods.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A threefold increase in grazing capacity was achieved in a five-year range improvement program involving the seeding of adapted clovers, phosphorus fertilization, and grazing management on over 500 acres. Grazing records and quadrat harvests demonstrate the marked success of the improvement methods.
Rapid spread of alfalfa pest: Spotted alfalfa aphid infests about 75% of state's alfalfa acreage within two years after its discovery in California
by Ray F. Smith, John E. Swift, Jack Dibble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The worst pest of alfalfa ever to reach California has spread within two years to 33 alfalfa-producing counties.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The worst pest of alfalfa ever to reach California has spread within two years to 33 alfalfa-producing counties.
Removal of tinder in ponderosa: Prescribed burning of forest brush during the wet season by tested methods effectively reduces hazard of wildfire
by H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dead material in second-growth ponderosa pine is one factor contributing to destructive uncontrolled fires in summer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dead material in second-growth ponderosa pine is one factor contributing to destructive uncontrolled fires in summer.
Red mite on pears: New acaricides included in early spray tests for control of European red mite
by Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Prebloom spray treatment against the overwintering eggs of European red mite on pears reduced populations and prevented an early season build-up. Thus far, Genite-923 is the only material which has given consistent control—at a dosage of 1% pints of 50% emulsion per 100 gallons—combined with lime-sulfur or organic fungicides regularly used for pear scab control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Prebloom spray treatment against the overwintering eggs of European red mite on pears reduced populations and prevented an early season build-up. Thus far, Genite-923 is the only material which has given consistent control—at a dosage of 1% pints of 50% emulsion per 100 gallons—combined with lime-sulfur or organic fungicides regularly used for pear scab control.
Russet on bartletts: Pears from trees treated with copper or streptomycin equally free from russet
by Richard W. Harris, William H. Griggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears from trees in two Mendocino County orchards and one Sacramento Valley orchard that were sprayed or dusted with copper—for blight control—during 1955 were as free from russet as fruit from trees treated with streptomycin.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears from trees in two Mendocino County orchards and one Sacramento Valley orchard that were sprayed or dusted with copper—for blight control—during 1955 were as free from russet as fruit from trees treated with streptomycin.
Codling moth on walnuts in '55: Downward trend in infestations of 1955 in northern California not uniform and need of control treatments in 1956 indicated
by A. E. Michelbacher, Earl Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The codling moth was less destructive—generally—to northern California walnuts in 1955 than in 1954.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The codling moth was less destructive—generally—to northern California walnuts in 1955 than in 1954.
DDT residues on sweet corn: Kernels and cob of corn treated with DDT remain practically free of residues but amounts on plant restrict use as fodder
by Oscar G. Bacon, Wallace R. Erwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Technical DDT at the rate of 4.5 to 12 pounds an acre—depending upon the method and number of applications—is applied to most of California's commercial sweet corn acreage to control the corn earworm.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Technical DDT at the rate of 4.5 to 12 pounds an acre—depending upon the method and number of applications—is applied to most of California's commercial sweet corn acreage to control the corn earworm.
Zinc-deficient crops: Sweet corn, tomatoes, beans, and sugar beets used in tests for zinc deficiency
by John C. Lingle, D. M. Holmberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Zinc sprays produced marked yield increases in certain annual crops in so-called sick-spots in Yolo County in 1955.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Zinc sprays produced marked yield increases in certain annual crops in so-called sick-spots in Yolo County in 1955.

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