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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.3

Hand duster powered by compressed air
March 1956
Volume 10, Number 3

Research articles

New air powered hand duster: Use of compressed air to fluidize dusts permits treatment of 7,000 square-foot-capacity glasshouse in less than half hour
by R. H. Sciaroni, Norman B. Akesson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Designed for applying insecticidal and fungicidal dusts to indoor ornamental crops—but practical elsewhere—a new power duster is efficient in glass, plastic, cloth, and lath houses where narrow walkways are customary.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Designed for applying insecticidal and fungicidal dusts to indoor ornamental crops—but practical elsewhere—a new power duster is efficient in glass, plastic, cloth, and lath houses where narrow walkways are customary.
Aphid damage to alfalfa hay: Honeydew of spotted alfalfa aphid apparently not distasteful to cattle but protein and carotene in damaged hay are reduced
by Roy V. Parker, Vernon E. Burton, Ray F. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—causes damage to alfalfa in a variety of ways.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—causes damage to alfalfa in a variety of ways.
Woolly apple aphid control: Upward and downward migration of aphid throughout trees reduced in preliminary experiments with chemical compounds
by Harold F. Madsen, Stanley C. Hoyt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Continual movement of the woolly apple aphid throughout the tree is one of the major difficulties in its control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Continual movement of the woolly apple aphid throughout the tree is one of the major difficulties in its control.
Control of cyclamen mite: Stocking test plots in new fields with natural enemies has given biological control on strawberries in first crop year
by C. B. Huffaker, C. E. Kennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The predatory mites,Typhlodromus cucumeris and T. reticulatus, are effective in controlling cyclamen mites—Tarsonemus pallidus—on field strawberries when they gain a fairly early general distribution in new fields, and if chemicals detrimental to them are not applied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The predatory mites,Typhlodromus cucumeris and T. reticulatus, are effective in controlling cyclamen mites—Tarsonemus pallidus—on field strawberries when they gain a fairly early general distribution in new fields, and if chemicals detrimental to them are not applied.
Control of walnut blight: Antibiotic and copper formulations tested in modified spray program in experimental plots in Sun Joaquin County
by Peter A. Ark, Fred M. Charles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The standard schedule for the control of walnut blight in California—one prebloom and one or two postbloom treatments with copper—depends on very accurate timing. If errors are made, control of the disease may not be achieved. Because of climatic conditions, sprays are sometimes applied when blooming is at an end. This is too late because the causal organism has had a chance to infect susceptible parts of the plant.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The standard schedule for the control of walnut blight in California—one prebloom and one or two postbloom treatments with copper—depends on very accurate timing. If errors are made, control of the disease may not be achieved. Because of climatic conditions, sprays are sometimes applied when blooming is at an end. This is too late because the causal organism has had a chance to infect susceptible parts of the plant.
Walnut aphid studies in 1955: Experimental systemic aphicide OMPA has outstanding promise but more studies needed before release for commercial use
by A. E. Michelbacher, Earl Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The 1955 infestations of the walnut aphid were exceedingly severe in certain areas, such as Linden. By early May, the average number of aphids found—on the next to the terminal leaflets—in some orchards exceeded 50.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The 1955 infestations of the walnut aphid were exceedingly severe in certain areas, such as Linden. By early May, the average number of aphids found—on the next to the terminal leaflets—in some orchards exceeded 50.
New roots on pine seedlings: Greenhouse tests with ponderosa pine seedlings indicate time of transplanting affects rooting ability of seedling
by Edward C. Stone, Gilbert H. Schubert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many cut-over forests in the California pine region are producing at much less than full capacity because of the practice of relying upon natural restocking by seed from the remaining trees. Some of these areas contain too few trees, some support trees of less desirable species, and some have been occupied by brush. If left as they are, many of these areas will require fifty to a hundred years before full production is achieved.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many cut-over forests in the California pine region are producing at much less than full capacity because of the practice of relying upon natural restocking by seed from the remaining trees. Some of these areas contain too few trees, some support trees of less desirable species, and some have been occupied by brush. If left as they are, many of these areas will require fifty to a hundred years before full production is achieved.
Sodium-calcium in young citrus: Ratio of sodium to calcium in the nutrient solution of sand cultures shown to affect mineral absorption and plant growth
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation waters applied to citrus orchards vary considerably—in their sodium and calcium content—in different locations, so studies were made with pure silica sand cultures with nutrient solutions of similar nitrate content and ratios of sodium and calcium.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation waters applied to citrus orchards vary considerably—in their sodium and calcium content—in different locations, so studies were made with pure silica sand cultures with nutrient solutions of similar nitrate content and ratios of sodium and calcium.
Trifoliate orange seedlings: Effect of various soil chemical properties on growth of trifoliate orange seedlings in sandy and in loam soils
by J. P. Martin, W. P. Bitters, J. O. Ervin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Orange trees on trifoliate orange root-stock have certain desirable characteristics—smaller trees that yield well in proportion to their size; fruit of better than average quality and size; generally early fruit maturity; tolerance to quick decline; and more cold resistance than other combinations—and the trifoliate root itself is relatively resistant to gummosis and to nematodes. Because of these characteristics, the trifoliate orange is sometimes selected by growers as a root-stock for oranges.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Orange trees on trifoliate orange root-stock have certain desirable characteristics—smaller trees that yield well in proportion to their size; fruit of better than average quality and size; generally early fruit maturity; tolerance to quick decline; and more cold resistance than other combinations—and the trifoliate root itself is relatively resistant to gummosis and to nematodes. Because of these characteristics, the trifoliate orange is sometimes selected by growers as a root-stock for oranges.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.3

Hand duster powered by compressed air
March 1956
Volume 10, Number 3

Research articles

New air powered hand duster: Use of compressed air to fluidize dusts permits treatment of 7,000 square-foot-capacity glasshouse in less than half hour
by R. H. Sciaroni, Norman B. Akesson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Designed for applying insecticidal and fungicidal dusts to indoor ornamental crops—but practical elsewhere—a new power duster is efficient in glass, plastic, cloth, and lath houses where narrow walkways are customary.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Designed for applying insecticidal and fungicidal dusts to indoor ornamental crops—but practical elsewhere—a new power duster is efficient in glass, plastic, cloth, and lath houses where narrow walkways are customary.
Aphid damage to alfalfa hay: Honeydew of spotted alfalfa aphid apparently not distasteful to cattle but protein and carotene in damaged hay are reduced
by Roy V. Parker, Vernon E. Burton, Ray F. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—causes damage to alfalfa in a variety of ways.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—causes damage to alfalfa in a variety of ways.
Woolly apple aphid control: Upward and downward migration of aphid throughout trees reduced in preliminary experiments with chemical compounds
by Harold F. Madsen, Stanley C. Hoyt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Continual movement of the woolly apple aphid throughout the tree is one of the major difficulties in its control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Continual movement of the woolly apple aphid throughout the tree is one of the major difficulties in its control.
Control of cyclamen mite: Stocking test plots in new fields with natural enemies has given biological control on strawberries in first crop year
by C. B. Huffaker, C. E. Kennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The predatory mites,Typhlodromus cucumeris and T. reticulatus, are effective in controlling cyclamen mites—Tarsonemus pallidus—on field strawberries when they gain a fairly early general distribution in new fields, and if chemicals detrimental to them are not applied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The predatory mites,Typhlodromus cucumeris and T. reticulatus, are effective in controlling cyclamen mites—Tarsonemus pallidus—on field strawberries when they gain a fairly early general distribution in new fields, and if chemicals detrimental to them are not applied.
Control of walnut blight: Antibiotic and copper formulations tested in modified spray program in experimental plots in Sun Joaquin County
by Peter A. Ark, Fred M. Charles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The standard schedule for the control of walnut blight in California—one prebloom and one or two postbloom treatments with copper—depends on very accurate timing. If errors are made, control of the disease may not be achieved. Because of climatic conditions, sprays are sometimes applied when blooming is at an end. This is too late because the causal organism has had a chance to infect susceptible parts of the plant.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The standard schedule for the control of walnut blight in California—one prebloom and one or two postbloom treatments with copper—depends on very accurate timing. If errors are made, control of the disease may not be achieved. Because of climatic conditions, sprays are sometimes applied when blooming is at an end. This is too late because the causal organism has had a chance to infect susceptible parts of the plant.
Walnut aphid studies in 1955: Experimental systemic aphicide OMPA has outstanding promise but more studies needed before release for commercial use
by A. E. Michelbacher, Earl Oatman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The 1955 infestations of the walnut aphid were exceedingly severe in certain areas, such as Linden. By early May, the average number of aphids found—on the next to the terminal leaflets—in some orchards exceeded 50.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The 1955 infestations of the walnut aphid were exceedingly severe in certain areas, such as Linden. By early May, the average number of aphids found—on the next to the terminal leaflets—in some orchards exceeded 50.
New roots on pine seedlings: Greenhouse tests with ponderosa pine seedlings indicate time of transplanting affects rooting ability of seedling
by Edward C. Stone, Gilbert H. Schubert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many cut-over forests in the California pine region are producing at much less than full capacity because of the practice of relying upon natural restocking by seed from the remaining trees. Some of these areas contain too few trees, some support trees of less desirable species, and some have been occupied by brush. If left as they are, many of these areas will require fifty to a hundred years before full production is achieved.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many cut-over forests in the California pine region are producing at much less than full capacity because of the practice of relying upon natural restocking by seed from the remaining trees. Some of these areas contain too few trees, some support trees of less desirable species, and some have been occupied by brush. If left as they are, many of these areas will require fifty to a hundred years before full production is achieved.
Sodium-calcium in young citrus: Ratio of sodium to calcium in the nutrient solution of sand cultures shown to affect mineral absorption and plant growth
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation waters applied to citrus orchards vary considerably—in their sodium and calcium content—in different locations, so studies were made with pure silica sand cultures with nutrient solutions of similar nitrate content and ratios of sodium and calcium.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation waters applied to citrus orchards vary considerably—in their sodium and calcium content—in different locations, so studies were made with pure silica sand cultures with nutrient solutions of similar nitrate content and ratios of sodium and calcium.
Trifoliate orange seedlings: Effect of various soil chemical properties on growth of trifoliate orange seedlings in sandy and in loam soils
by J. P. Martin, W. P. Bitters, J. O. Ervin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Orange trees on trifoliate orange root-stock have certain desirable characteristics—smaller trees that yield well in proportion to their size; fruit of better than average quality and size; generally early fruit maturity; tolerance to quick decline; and more cold resistance than other combinations—and the trifoliate root itself is relatively resistant to gummosis and to nematodes. Because of these characteristics, the trifoliate orange is sometimes selected by growers as a root-stock for oranges.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Orange trees on trifoliate orange root-stock have certain desirable characteristics—smaller trees that yield well in proportion to their size; fruit of better than average quality and size; generally early fruit maturity; tolerance to quick decline; and more cold resistance than other combinations—and the trifoliate root itself is relatively resistant to gummosis and to nematodes. Because of these characteristics, the trifoliate orange is sometimes selected by growers as a root-stock for oranges.

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