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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.4

Control of soil-borne fungus disease
April 1955
Volume 9, Number 4

Research articles

Packing box, distribution costs: Deciduous fruit packing house operation studies include cost and efficiency analysis of several methods of supplying boxes
by L. L. Sammet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The following article is one of a series of reports of studies on Efficiency in Fruit Marketing made co-operatively by the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, University of California, and the Agricultural Marketing Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act. Detailed reports are available by addressing the Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Pedigree turkey breeding costs: Pedigree breeding enterprises studied to evaluate the efficiency and potential gains of pedigree selection program
by J. C. Abbott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Long-run progress in the turkey industry is bound up with the work of the pedigree breeder.
Long-run progress in the turkey industry is bound up with the work of the pedigree breeder.
Effect of pesticides on honeybees: Relative toxicity of pesticide dusts studied in laboratory tests with controlled temperature, humidity, and time
by E. L. Atkins, L. D. Anderson, T. O. Tuft
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In comparative toxicity studies of 57 pesticide dusts, DNOSOBP—2,4dinitro-o-secObutyl phenol (DN-211)—was the most toxic to honeybees.
In comparative toxicity studies of 57 pesticide dusts, DNOSOBP—2,4dinitro-o-secObutyl phenol (DN-211)—was the most toxic to honeybees.
Small fruit sizes of valencias: Continuing long-range study in state's Valencia districts produces evidence that climatic factors may be critical
by R. B. Harding, H. D. Chapman, F. L. Whiting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Small fruit size is one of the most serious problems of the California citrus industry.
Small fruit size is one of the most serious problems of the California citrus industry.
Auxins for hardwood cuttings: Effect of root-promoting hormones in propagating fruit trees by hardwood cuttings studied during past three seasons
by H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Hardwood cuttings of five species of fruit trees, Marianna 2624 plum, Angers quince, Stockton Morello cherry, Malling-Merton 793 apple, and Mission olive, were used in propagation tests to study the effects of various root-promoting hormones—auxins—applied under several different conditions.
Hardwood cuttings of five species of fruit trees, Marianna 2624 plum, Angers quince, Stockton Morello cherry, Malling-Merton 793 apple, and Mission olive, were used in propagation tests to study the effects of various root-promoting hormones—auxins—applied under several different conditions.
Chemical control of Clubroot disease of brussels sprouts: Results from cooperative work between California extension service and experiment station in San Mateo County
by W. C. Snyder, L. D. Leach, R. H. Sciaroni, Chries M. Rick, Donald Y. Perkins, Norman B. Akesson, Ralph R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Clubroot, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.
Chemical Control of Clubroot Disease of Brussels Sprouts results from cooperative work between California Extension Service and Experiment Station in San Mateo County
by W. C. Snyder, L. D. Leach, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.
Chemical Control of Clubroot Disease of Brussels Sprouts results from cooperative work between California Extension Service and Experiment Station in San Mateo County
by Chries M. Rick, Donald Y. Perkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.
Chemical Control of Clubroot Disease of Brussels Sprouts results from cooperative work between California Extension Service and Experiment Station in San Mateo County
by Norman B. Akesson, Ralph R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.4

Control of soil-borne fungus disease
April 1955
Volume 9, Number 4

Research articles

Packing box, distribution costs: Deciduous fruit packing house operation studies include cost and efficiency analysis of several methods of supplying boxes
by L. L. Sammet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The following article is one of a series of reports of studies on Efficiency in Fruit Marketing made co-operatively by the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, University of California, and the Agricultural Marketing Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act. Detailed reports are available by addressing the Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Pedigree turkey breeding costs: Pedigree breeding enterprises studied to evaluate the efficiency and potential gains of pedigree selection program
by J. C. Abbott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Long-run progress in the turkey industry is bound up with the work of the pedigree breeder.
Long-run progress in the turkey industry is bound up with the work of the pedigree breeder.
Effect of pesticides on honeybees: Relative toxicity of pesticide dusts studied in laboratory tests with controlled temperature, humidity, and time
by E. L. Atkins, L. D. Anderson, T. O. Tuft
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In comparative toxicity studies of 57 pesticide dusts, DNOSOBP—2,4dinitro-o-secObutyl phenol (DN-211)—was the most toxic to honeybees.
In comparative toxicity studies of 57 pesticide dusts, DNOSOBP—2,4dinitro-o-secObutyl phenol (DN-211)—was the most toxic to honeybees.
Small fruit sizes of valencias: Continuing long-range study in state's Valencia districts produces evidence that climatic factors may be critical
by R. B. Harding, H. D. Chapman, F. L. Whiting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Small fruit size is one of the most serious problems of the California citrus industry.
Small fruit size is one of the most serious problems of the California citrus industry.
Auxins for hardwood cuttings: Effect of root-promoting hormones in propagating fruit trees by hardwood cuttings studied during past three seasons
by H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Hardwood cuttings of five species of fruit trees, Marianna 2624 plum, Angers quince, Stockton Morello cherry, Malling-Merton 793 apple, and Mission olive, were used in propagation tests to study the effects of various root-promoting hormones—auxins—applied under several different conditions.
Hardwood cuttings of five species of fruit trees, Marianna 2624 plum, Angers quince, Stockton Morello cherry, Malling-Merton 793 apple, and Mission olive, were used in propagation tests to study the effects of various root-promoting hormones—auxins—applied under several different conditions.
Chemical control of Clubroot disease of brussels sprouts: Results from cooperative work between California extension service and experiment station in San Mateo County
by W. C. Snyder, L. D. Leach, R. H. Sciaroni, Chries M. Rick, Donald Y. Perkins, Norman B. Akesson, Ralph R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Clubroot, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.
Chemical Control of Clubroot Disease of Brussels Sprouts results from cooperative work between California Extension Service and Experiment Station in San Mateo County
by W. C. Snyder, L. D. Leach, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.
Chemical Control of Clubroot Disease of Brussels Sprouts results from cooperative work between California Extension Service and Experiment Station in San Mateo County
by Chries M. Rick, Donald Y. Perkins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.
Chemical Control of Clubroot Disease of Brussels Sprouts results from cooperative work between California Extension Service and Experiment Station in San Mateo County
by Norman B. Akesson, Ralph R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
, a soil-borne fungus disease, threatened California's 4-5 million dollar Brussels sprouts industry. Control was achieved on 250 acres in San Mateo County in 1954 as a result of an integrated three-phase research program carried out under actual field conditions within the county.

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