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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.5

Control of petalblight disease of azaleas
May 1955
Volume 9, Number 5

Research articles

Costs of lumber production: Production costs in California have become vital factor in determining nation-wide use of lumber and its price level
by Henry J. Vaux
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: One fourth of all lumber produced in the United States is cut within 300 miles of Redding—making California a far more vital factor in the nation's lumber supply than it has ever been.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: One fourth of all lumber produced in the United States is cut within 300 miles of Redding—making California a far more vital factor in the nation's lumber supply than it has ever been.
Range cover after noxious weed: Desirable and undesirable grasses and forbs compete for range space cleared of Klamath weed by leaf-feeding beetles
by Alfred H. Murphy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: On two test ranches—in southeastern Humboldt County—range grasses and forbs quickly replaced Klamath weed following biological control by beetles- Chrysolina—which feed exclusively on the weed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: On two test ranches—in southeastern Humboldt County—range grasses and forbs quickly replaced Klamath weed following biological control by beetles- Chrysolina—which feed exclusively on the weed.
Brush control with chemicals: Hormone-type sprays tested for use in brushland management prove most effective when applied to current year seedlings
by A. M. Schultz, H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush seedlings usually appear in abundance after fire and—unless they are reduced in number—a stand of brush develops that is too dense for best use by livestock or deer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush seedlings usually appear in abundance after fire and—unless they are reduced in number—a stand of brush develops that is too dense for best use by livestock or deer.
Codling moth control sprays: New insecticides tested in field investigations in southern California for effectiveness against several pests of walnuts
by J. C. Ortega
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improper timing—or complete omission—of DDT treatment was the major contributing factor to the relatively high infestations of codling moth in walnuts in some areas of southern California during the 1954 season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improper timing—or complete omission—of DDT treatment was the major contributing factor to the relatively high infestations of codling moth in walnuts in some areas of southern California during the 1954 season.
Petal blight disease of azaleas: Control of fungus-caused disease of azaleas and closely related plants is essential to prevent its further spread
by Robert D. Raabe, Richard H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A fungus disease of azaleas—and closely related plants—is becoming widespread in nurseries of the San Francisco Bay region.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A fungus disease of azaleas—and closely related plants—is becoming widespread in nurseries of the San Francisco Bay region.
Disease-free geranium stock: Production of healthy cutting stock increased by growing system that permits higher returns from smaller acreage
by Donald E. Munnecke, Philip A. Chandler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several diseases of geraniums—Pelargonium hortorum—have, in recent years, severely limited the production of California-grown cuttings for shipment and sale throughout the United States.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several diseases of geraniums—Pelargonium hortorum—have, in recent years, severely limited the production of California-grown cuttings for shipment and sale throughout the United States.
Valencia orange size and 2,4-D: Adequate soil moisture important for increasing fruit sizes with 2,4-D sprays applied when fruits are 4–12 weeks old
by Louis C. Erickson, Sterling J. Richards
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil moisture plays an important part in the successful use of 2,4-D for increasing Valencia orange fruit sizes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil moisture plays an important part in the successful use of 2,4-D for increasing Valencia orange fruit sizes.
Argentine ant control on citrus: Granular formulations of certain chlorinated hydrocarbons applied to soil surface show promise in preliminary trials
by G. E. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides—dieldrin, heptachlor, chlordane, and aldrin—in granular formulations spread evenly over the ground in citrus orchards, have given as good ant control as comparative spray tests.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides—dieldrin, heptachlor, chlordane, and aldrin—in granular formulations spread evenly over the ground in citrus orchards, have given as good ant control as comparative spray tests.
Orange fruit size and yield: 31-year study of interrelationship of temperatures and orange fruit size and yield indicates influence of some climatic factor
by Joseph M. Caprio, Robert B. Harding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Of the principal citrus areas of the world, only California seems to have a serious problem in small sizes of orange fruits.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Of the principal citrus areas of the world, only California seems to have a serious problem in small sizes of orange fruits.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.5

Control of petalblight disease of azaleas
May 1955
Volume 9, Number 5

Research articles

Costs of lumber production: Production costs in California have become vital factor in determining nation-wide use of lumber and its price level
by Henry J. Vaux
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: One fourth of all lumber produced in the United States is cut within 300 miles of Redding—making California a far more vital factor in the nation's lumber supply than it has ever been.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: One fourth of all lumber produced in the United States is cut within 300 miles of Redding—making California a far more vital factor in the nation's lumber supply than it has ever been.
Range cover after noxious weed: Desirable and undesirable grasses and forbs compete for range space cleared of Klamath weed by leaf-feeding beetles
by Alfred H. Murphy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: On two test ranches—in southeastern Humboldt County—range grasses and forbs quickly replaced Klamath weed following biological control by beetles- Chrysolina—which feed exclusively on the weed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: On two test ranches—in southeastern Humboldt County—range grasses and forbs quickly replaced Klamath weed following biological control by beetles- Chrysolina—which feed exclusively on the weed.
Brush control with chemicals: Hormone-type sprays tested for use in brushland management prove most effective when applied to current year seedlings
by A. M. Schultz, H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush seedlings usually appear in abundance after fire and—unless they are reduced in number—a stand of brush develops that is too dense for best use by livestock or deer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush seedlings usually appear in abundance after fire and—unless they are reduced in number—a stand of brush develops that is too dense for best use by livestock or deer.
Codling moth control sprays: New insecticides tested in field investigations in southern California for effectiveness against several pests of walnuts
by J. C. Ortega
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improper timing—or complete omission—of DDT treatment was the major contributing factor to the relatively high infestations of codling moth in walnuts in some areas of southern California during the 1954 season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Improper timing—or complete omission—of DDT treatment was the major contributing factor to the relatively high infestations of codling moth in walnuts in some areas of southern California during the 1954 season.
Petal blight disease of azaleas: Control of fungus-caused disease of azaleas and closely related plants is essential to prevent its further spread
by Robert D. Raabe, Richard H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A fungus disease of azaleas—and closely related plants—is becoming widespread in nurseries of the San Francisco Bay region.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A fungus disease of azaleas—and closely related plants—is becoming widespread in nurseries of the San Francisco Bay region.
Disease-free geranium stock: Production of healthy cutting stock increased by growing system that permits higher returns from smaller acreage
by Donald E. Munnecke, Philip A. Chandler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several diseases of geraniums—Pelargonium hortorum—have, in recent years, severely limited the production of California-grown cuttings for shipment and sale throughout the United States.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several diseases of geraniums—Pelargonium hortorum—have, in recent years, severely limited the production of California-grown cuttings for shipment and sale throughout the United States.
Valencia orange size and 2,4-D: Adequate soil moisture important for increasing fruit sizes with 2,4-D sprays applied when fruits are 4–12 weeks old
by Louis C. Erickson, Sterling J. Richards
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil moisture plays an important part in the successful use of 2,4-D for increasing Valencia orange fruit sizes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil moisture plays an important part in the successful use of 2,4-D for increasing Valencia orange fruit sizes.
Argentine ant control on citrus: Granular formulations of certain chlorinated hydrocarbons applied to soil surface show promise in preliminary trials
by G. E. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides—dieldrin, heptachlor, chlordane, and aldrin—in granular formulations spread evenly over the ground in citrus orchards, have given as good ant control as comparative spray tests.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides—dieldrin, heptachlor, chlordane, and aldrin—in granular formulations spread evenly over the ground in citrus orchards, have given as good ant control as comparative spray tests.
Orange fruit size and yield: 31-year study of interrelationship of temperatures and orange fruit size and yield indicates influence of some climatic factor
by Joseph M. Caprio, Robert B. Harding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Of the principal citrus areas of the world, only California seems to have a serious problem in small sizes of orange fruits.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Of the principal citrus areas of the world, only California seems to have a serious problem in small sizes of orange fruits.

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