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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.3

Khapra beetle control investigations
March 1955
Volume 9, Number 3

Research articles

Prices and marketing margins: Studies show how retail stores price their fresh citrus, and what it means to growers, distributors, and consumers
by Sidney Hoos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The following is the first of two articles based on a study of prices and retail margins for oranges, lemons, and grapefruit, reported in detail in Reports No. 168 and No. 170, published by the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, University of California, Berkeley.
The following is the first of two articles based on a study of prices and retail margins for oranges, lemons, and grapefruit, reported in detail in Reports No. 168 and No. 170, published by the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, University of California, Berkeley.
Navel orangeworm: Field control of walnut pest in northern California aided by restrictive measures
by A. E. Michelbacher, Norman Ross
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The naval orangeworm has been increasing as a pest of walnuts and almonds.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The naval orangeworm has been increasing as a pest of walnuts and almonds.
Russeting of bartlett pears: Investigation in two areas showed copper dusts applied for blight control not cause of russeting in orchards studied
by Richard W. Harris, William H. Griggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears—in a Placer County foothill orchard and in a Sacramento Valley orchard—were equally russeted in 1954, whether they developed on trees dusted with copper, sprayed with streptomycin, or given no blight control treatment during the blossoming period.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears—in a Placer County foothill orchard and in a Sacramento Valley orchard—were equally russeted in 1954, whether they developed on trees dusted with copper, sprayed with streptomycin, or given no blight control treatment during the blossoming period.
Burning and soil fertility: Greenhouse tests with lettuce and barley indicate nutrient content of forest soils increased by prescribed burning
by J. Vlamis, A. M. Schultz, H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Effects of prescribed burning on soil fertility were studied on two California forest soils—Salminas at Hobergs in Lake County and Holland at the Teaford Forest in Madera County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Effects of prescribed burning on soil fertility were studied on two California forest soils—Salminas at Hobergs in Lake County and Holland at the Teaford Forest in Madera County.
Khapra beetle control studies: Preliminary results of tests with fumigants and dust give promise of effective treatments against destructive pest
by D. L. Lindgren, L. E. Vincent, H. E. Krohne
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The State of California, by Quarantine Regulation 21, effective January 12, 1955, prohibits the removal from property infested with the Khapra beetle—Trogoderma granarium, Everts—of all materials that might help the spread of this insect which is so destructive to stored grain and grain products.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The State of California, by Quarantine Regulation 21, effective January 12, 1955, prohibits the removal from property infested with the Khapra beetle—Trogoderma granarium, Everts—of all materials that might help the spread of this insect which is so destructive to stored grain and grain products.
Water quality in rice fields: Studies of possible causes of poor rice stands indicate level of total salts content of water influences growth and yield
by L. K. Stromberg, Hidemi Yamada
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several hundred acres of rice in Fresno County were abandoned in the spring of 1954 because the stands had either died out completely or had become so sparse that it was uneconomical to continue farming them.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several hundred acres of rice in Fresno County were abandoned in the spring of 1954 because the stands had either died out completely or had become so sparse that it was uneconomical to continue farming them.
Crown and root rot of alfalfa: New disease of alfalfa caused by water mold found to be component of the crown and root rot complex
by Donald C. Erwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa—Medicago sativa—stand loss due to crown and root rot in some areas of California may be nearly as great as that caused by bacterial wilt. The common term crown rot includes more than one specific disease, and not all of the causal components of this disease complex are known.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa—Medicago sativa—stand loss due to crown and root rot in some areas of California may be nearly as great as that caused by bacterial wilt. The common term crown rot includes more than one specific disease, and not all of the causal components of this disease complex are known.
Westside dust plots: Test plantings show some promise as means of reducing dust problem
by Lloyd N. Brown, James L. Myler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Areas of bare ground—in fenced test plots of about 500 acres each in Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties—almost disappeared during two years of favorable weather.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Areas of bare ground—in fenced test plots of about 500 acres each in Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties—almost disappeared during two years of favorable weather.
Index of orange fruit maturity: Compositional changes in the juice of Washington navel and Valencia oranges studied during development and ripening
by Randolph T. Wedding, Raymond P. Horspoof
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The need for delivering to the market citrus fruits of the highest possible internal quality promoted interest in the possibility of the association of marketable quality with some measurable entity other than the commonly used ratio of total soluble solids to titratable acidity. In the course of investigations of the changes in nitrogenous constituents during the maturation of orange fruits, it was possible to gather data which demonstrate the changes in the concentration of certain constituents of the juice which occur during the development and ripening of these fruits.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The need for delivering to the market citrus fruits of the highest possible internal quality promoted interest in the possibility of the association of marketable quality with some measurable entity other than the commonly used ratio of total soluble solids to titratable acidity. In the course of investigations of the changes in nitrogenous constituents during the maturation of orange fruits, it was possible to gather data which demonstrate the changes in the concentration of certain constituents of the juice which occur during the development and ripening of these fruits.
Fluorine toxicity in citrus: Growth retardation and leaf tip-burn accompanied increased fIuorine concentrations in experimentaI laboratory cultures
by A. R. C. Haas, J. N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage injury in certain fruit tree varieties has been reported as being quite serious when the leaves were subject to hydrogen fluoride or fluorine deposits. Leaf tip-burn resulted in gladiolus plants when exposure was made to various concentrations of fluorine gas. Leaves of citrus trees located in close proximity to gaseous sources of fluorine are reported as containing an increased content of fluorine. Fluorides are known to occur in certain crude phosphate materials, the very sources from which fertilizers are prepared.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage injury in certain fruit tree varieties has been reported as being quite serious when the leaves were subject to hydrogen fluoride or fluorine deposits. Leaf tip-burn resulted in gladiolus plants when exposure was made to various concentrations of fluorine gas. Leaves of citrus trees located in close proximity to gaseous sources of fluorine are reported as containing an increased content of fluorine. Fluorides are known to occur in certain crude phosphate materials, the very sources from which fertilizers are prepared.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.3

Khapra beetle control investigations
March 1955
Volume 9, Number 3

Research articles

Prices and marketing margins: Studies show how retail stores price their fresh citrus, and what it means to growers, distributors, and consumers
by Sidney Hoos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The following is the first of two articles based on a study of prices and retail margins for oranges, lemons, and grapefruit, reported in detail in Reports No. 168 and No. 170, published by the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, University of California, Berkeley.
The following is the first of two articles based on a study of prices and retail margins for oranges, lemons, and grapefruit, reported in detail in Reports No. 168 and No. 170, published by the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, University of California, Berkeley.
Navel orangeworm: Field control of walnut pest in northern California aided by restrictive measures
by A. E. Michelbacher, Norman Ross
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The naval orangeworm has been increasing as a pest of walnuts and almonds.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The naval orangeworm has been increasing as a pest of walnuts and almonds.
Russeting of bartlett pears: Investigation in two areas showed copper dusts applied for blight control not cause of russeting in orchards studied
by Richard W. Harris, William H. Griggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears—in a Placer County foothill orchard and in a Sacramento Valley orchard—were equally russeted in 1954, whether they developed on trees dusted with copper, sprayed with streptomycin, or given no blight control treatment during the blossoming period.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Bartlett pears—in a Placer County foothill orchard and in a Sacramento Valley orchard—were equally russeted in 1954, whether they developed on trees dusted with copper, sprayed with streptomycin, or given no blight control treatment during the blossoming period.
Burning and soil fertility: Greenhouse tests with lettuce and barley indicate nutrient content of forest soils increased by prescribed burning
by J. Vlamis, A. M. Schultz, H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Effects of prescribed burning on soil fertility were studied on two California forest soils—Salminas at Hobergs in Lake County and Holland at the Teaford Forest in Madera County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Effects of prescribed burning on soil fertility were studied on two California forest soils—Salminas at Hobergs in Lake County and Holland at the Teaford Forest in Madera County.
Khapra beetle control studies: Preliminary results of tests with fumigants and dust give promise of effective treatments against destructive pest
by D. L. Lindgren, L. E. Vincent, H. E. Krohne
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The State of California, by Quarantine Regulation 21, effective January 12, 1955, prohibits the removal from property infested with the Khapra beetle—Trogoderma granarium, Everts—of all materials that might help the spread of this insect which is so destructive to stored grain and grain products.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The State of California, by Quarantine Regulation 21, effective January 12, 1955, prohibits the removal from property infested with the Khapra beetle—Trogoderma granarium, Everts—of all materials that might help the spread of this insect which is so destructive to stored grain and grain products.
Water quality in rice fields: Studies of possible causes of poor rice stands indicate level of total salts content of water influences growth and yield
by L. K. Stromberg, Hidemi Yamada
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several hundred acres of rice in Fresno County were abandoned in the spring of 1954 because the stands had either died out completely or had become so sparse that it was uneconomical to continue farming them.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Several hundred acres of rice in Fresno County were abandoned in the spring of 1954 because the stands had either died out completely or had become so sparse that it was uneconomical to continue farming them.
Crown and root rot of alfalfa: New disease of alfalfa caused by water mold found to be component of the crown and root rot complex
by Donald C. Erwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa—Medicago sativa—stand loss due to crown and root rot in some areas of California may be nearly as great as that caused by bacterial wilt. The common term crown rot includes more than one specific disease, and not all of the causal components of this disease complex are known.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa—Medicago sativa—stand loss due to crown and root rot in some areas of California may be nearly as great as that caused by bacterial wilt. The common term crown rot includes more than one specific disease, and not all of the causal components of this disease complex are known.
Westside dust plots: Test plantings show some promise as means of reducing dust problem
by Lloyd N. Brown, James L. Myler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Areas of bare ground—in fenced test plots of about 500 acres each in Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties—almost disappeared during two years of favorable weather.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Areas of bare ground—in fenced test plots of about 500 acres each in Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties—almost disappeared during two years of favorable weather.
Index of orange fruit maturity: Compositional changes in the juice of Washington navel and Valencia oranges studied during development and ripening
by Randolph T. Wedding, Raymond P. Horspoof
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The need for delivering to the market citrus fruits of the highest possible internal quality promoted interest in the possibility of the association of marketable quality with some measurable entity other than the commonly used ratio of total soluble solids to titratable acidity. In the course of investigations of the changes in nitrogenous constituents during the maturation of orange fruits, it was possible to gather data which demonstrate the changes in the concentration of certain constituents of the juice which occur during the development and ripening of these fruits.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The need for delivering to the market citrus fruits of the highest possible internal quality promoted interest in the possibility of the association of marketable quality with some measurable entity other than the commonly used ratio of total soluble solids to titratable acidity. In the course of investigations of the changes in nitrogenous constituents during the maturation of orange fruits, it was possible to gather data which demonstrate the changes in the concentration of certain constituents of the juice which occur during the development and ripening of these fruits.
Fluorine toxicity in citrus: Growth retardation and leaf tip-burn accompanied increased fIuorine concentrations in experimentaI laboratory cultures
by A. R. C. Haas, J. N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage injury in certain fruit tree varieties has been reported as being quite serious when the leaves were subject to hydrogen fluoride or fluorine deposits. Leaf tip-burn resulted in gladiolus plants when exposure was made to various concentrations of fluorine gas. Leaves of citrus trees located in close proximity to gaseous sources of fluorine are reported as containing an increased content of fluorine. Fluorides are known to occur in certain crude phosphate materials, the very sources from which fertilizers are prepared.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage injury in certain fruit tree varieties has been reported as being quite serious when the leaves were subject to hydrogen fluoride or fluorine deposits. Leaf tip-burn resulted in gladiolus plants when exposure was made to various concentrations of fluorine gas. Leaves of citrus trees located in close proximity to gaseous sources of fluorine are reported as containing an increased content of fluorine. Fluorides are known to occur in certain crude phosphate materials, the very sources from which fertilizers are prepared.

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