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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.2

Avocado rootstock-scion compatibility
February 1955
Volume 9, Number 2

Research articles

Crop controls and 1955 outlook: Shifts in land use pattern expected to follow acreage allotments for 1955 will influence farm incomes
by Arthur Shultis, George Alcorn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under crop production controls in effect January 1, 1955, California's cotton allotment was 778,686 acres – compared with the 1954 allotment of 936,408 – a reduction of around 158,000 acres. The acreage in cultivation on July 1 was 906,700.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under crop production controls in effect January 1, 1955, California's cotton allotment was 778,686 acres – compared with the 1954 allotment of 936,408 – a reduction of around 158,000 acres. The acreage in cultivation on July 1 was 906,700.
Early sprays for mite control: European red mite on pear trees held in check by prebloom sprays until the summer treatment period
by Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Control of European red mite—Metatetranychus ulmi Koch—is one of the major problems of pear and apple growers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Control of European red mite—Metatetranychus ulmi Koch—is one of the major problems of pear and apple growers.
Cooling fruit in fibreboard: New containers for plums and pears tested for their suitability to present packing and shipping methods
by Rene Guillou
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Concern that customary handling and cooling methods—developed for wooden containers—might result in unsatisfactory cooling when applied to fibreboard containers led to studies of cooling measurements with plums and pears at Davis.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Concern that customary handling and cooling methods—developed for wooden containers—might result in unsatisfactory cooling when applied to fibreboard containers led to studies of cooling measurements with plums and pears at Davis.
Coniferous seedling survival: Poor survival may be due to physiological conditions associated with root-producing ability of planting stock
by Edward C. Stone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least half of the more than 12 million coniferous seedlings planted in California during the past five years failed to survive their first summer in the field. Part of this failure can be related to factors such as rodents, livestock, and competing vegetation. On the other hand, there are many instances where the reason is not apparent; not even the long summer drought nor the high temperatures associated with California's Mediterranean-like climate are satisfactory explanations.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least half of the more than 12 million coniferous seedlings planted in California during the past five years failed to survive their first summer in the field. Part of this failure can be related to factors such as rodents, livestock, and competing vegetation. On the other hand, there are many instances where the reason is not apparent; not even the long summer drought nor the high temperatures associated with California's Mediterranean-like climate are satisfactory explanations.
Big vein of lettuce: Interrelated effects of the disease and market price on head lettuce yield
by F. W. Zink, R. G. Grogan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Big vein of lettuce occurs every year in California, especially in the spring crop of the central coastal area where practically 100% of the plants in some fields are affected.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Big vein of lettuce occurs every year in California, especially in the spring crop of the central coastal area where practically 100% of the plants in some fields are affected.
Stored strawberry plants: August planting in southern California frost-free areas gave crop in 1 instead of 1 1/2 years needed by April planting
by Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety—dug in February and stored at 28F-30F until planted in August—produced as well the following spring as April plantings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety—dug in February and stored at 28F-30F until planted in August—produced as well the following spring as April plantings.
Avocado variety investigations: Suitability of avocado varieties to climatic conditions of Riverside under long-term tests in experimental orchard
by M. M. Winslow, Julius Enderud
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Avocado varieties found unsatisfactory—for growing in the experimental orchard at Riverside—are changed by grafting or topworking the trees. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Avocado varieties found unsatisfactory—for growing in the experimental orchard at Riverside—are changed by grafting or topworking the trees. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Avocado rootstock-scion studies: Compatibility between avocado and new rootstocks suitable to California is object of plant program
by C. A. Schroeder, E. F. Frolich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The imperative need for new avocado rootstocks—with disease resistance and other desirable characteristics, such as dwarfing habit—is the reason for a program of introduction and establishment in California of many avocado forms and botanical relatives.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The imperative need for new avocado rootstocks—with disease resistance and other desirable characteristics, such as dwarfing habit—is the reason for a program of introduction and establishment in California of many avocado forms and botanical relatives.
Chloride toxicity in avocados: Tests show chloride absorption and toxicity vary with the seedling variety and the form of nitrogen
by J. N. Brusca, A. R. C. Haas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In many avocado orchards, the tips of the leaves—and in severe cases the leaf-margins also—become brown as the leaves reach full maturity. Tissue-yellowing usually precedes the leaf-burn, and the extent of leaf-burn depends on the nature of the seedling variety and concentration of chloride in the leaf tissue.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In many avocado orchards, the tips of the leaves—and in severe cases the leaf-margins also—become brown as the leaves reach full maturity. Tissue-yellowing usually precedes the leaf-burn, and the extent of leaf-burn depends on the nature of the seedling variety and concentration of chloride in the leaf tissue.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 9, No.2

Avocado rootstock-scion compatibility
February 1955
Volume 9, Number 2

Research articles

Crop controls and 1955 outlook: Shifts in land use pattern expected to follow acreage allotments for 1955 will influence farm incomes
by Arthur Shultis, George Alcorn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under crop production controls in effect January 1, 1955, California's cotton allotment was 778,686 acres – compared with the 1954 allotment of 936,408 – a reduction of around 158,000 acres. The acreage in cultivation on July 1 was 906,700.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under crop production controls in effect January 1, 1955, California's cotton allotment was 778,686 acres – compared with the 1954 allotment of 936,408 – a reduction of around 158,000 acres. The acreage in cultivation on July 1 was 906,700.
Early sprays for mite control: European red mite on pear trees held in check by prebloom sprays until the summer treatment period
by Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Control of European red mite—Metatetranychus ulmi Koch—is one of the major problems of pear and apple growers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Control of European red mite—Metatetranychus ulmi Koch—is one of the major problems of pear and apple growers.
Cooling fruit in fibreboard: New containers for plums and pears tested for their suitability to present packing and shipping methods
by Rene Guillou
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Concern that customary handling and cooling methods—developed for wooden containers—might result in unsatisfactory cooling when applied to fibreboard containers led to studies of cooling measurements with plums and pears at Davis.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Concern that customary handling and cooling methods—developed for wooden containers—might result in unsatisfactory cooling when applied to fibreboard containers led to studies of cooling measurements with plums and pears at Davis.
Coniferous seedling survival: Poor survival may be due to physiological conditions associated with root-producing ability of planting stock
by Edward C. Stone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least half of the more than 12 million coniferous seedlings planted in California during the past five years failed to survive their first summer in the field. Part of this failure can be related to factors such as rodents, livestock, and competing vegetation. On the other hand, there are many instances where the reason is not apparent; not even the long summer drought nor the high temperatures associated with California's Mediterranean-like climate are satisfactory explanations.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least half of the more than 12 million coniferous seedlings planted in California during the past five years failed to survive their first summer in the field. Part of this failure can be related to factors such as rodents, livestock, and competing vegetation. On the other hand, there are many instances where the reason is not apparent; not even the long summer drought nor the high temperatures associated with California's Mediterranean-like climate are satisfactory explanations.
Big vein of lettuce: Interrelated effects of the disease and market price on head lettuce yield
by F. W. Zink, R. G. Grogan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Big vein of lettuce occurs every year in California, especially in the spring crop of the central coastal area where practically 100% of the plants in some fields are affected.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Big vein of lettuce occurs every year in California, especially in the spring crop of the central coastal area where practically 100% of the plants in some fields are affected.
Stored strawberry plants: August planting in southern California frost-free areas gave crop in 1 instead of 1 1/2 years needed by April planting
by Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety—dug in February and stored at 28F-30F until planted in August—produced as well the following spring as April plantings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Strawberry plants of the Lassen variety—dug in February and stored at 28F-30F until planted in August—produced as well the following spring as April plantings.
Avocado variety investigations: Suitability of avocado varieties to climatic conditions of Riverside under long-term tests in experimental orchard
by M. M. Winslow, Julius Enderud
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Avocado varieties found unsatisfactory—for growing in the experimental orchard at Riverside—are changed by grafting or topworking the trees. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Avocado varieties found unsatisfactory—for growing in the experimental orchard at Riverside—are changed by grafting or topworking the trees. Topworked trees have ranged in age from six to 10 years.
Avocado rootstock-scion studies: Compatibility between avocado and new rootstocks suitable to California is object of plant program
by C. A. Schroeder, E. F. Frolich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The imperative need for new avocado rootstocks—with disease resistance and other desirable characteristics, such as dwarfing habit—is the reason for a program of introduction and establishment in California of many avocado forms and botanical relatives.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The imperative need for new avocado rootstocks—with disease resistance and other desirable characteristics, such as dwarfing habit—is the reason for a program of introduction and establishment in California of many avocado forms and botanical relatives.
Chloride toxicity in avocados: Tests show chloride absorption and toxicity vary with the seedling variety and the form of nitrogen
by J. N. Brusca, A. R. C. Haas
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In many avocado orchards, the tips of the leaves—and in severe cases the leaf-margins also—become brown as the leaves reach full maturity. Tissue-yellowing usually precedes the leaf-burn, and the extent of leaf-burn depends on the nature of the seedling variety and concentration of chloride in the leaf tissue.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In many avocado orchards, the tips of the leaves—and in severe cases the leaf-margins also—become brown as the leaves reach full maturity. Tissue-yellowing usually precedes the leaf-burn, and the extent of leaf-burn depends on the nature of the seedling variety and concentration of chloride in the leaf tissue.

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