California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Coniferous seedling survival: Poor survival may be due to physiological conditions associated with root-producing ability of planting stock

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Edward C. Stone, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 9(2):7-15.

Published February 01, 1955

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

At least half of the more than 12 million coniferous seedlings planted in California during the past five years failed to survive their first summer in the field. Part of this failure can be related to factors such as rodents, livestock, and competing vegetation. On the other hand, there are many instances where the reason is not apparent; not even the long summer drought nor the high temperatures associated with California's Mediterranean-like climate are satisfactory explanations.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1577.

Coniferous seedling survival: Poor survival may be due to physiological conditions associated with root-producing ability of planting stock

Edward C. Stone
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Coniferous seedling survival: Poor survival may be due to physiological conditions associated with root-producing ability of planting stock

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Edward C. Stone, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 9(2):7-15.

Published February 01, 1955

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

At least half of the more than 12 million coniferous seedlings planted in California during the past five years failed to survive their first summer in the field. Part of this failure can be related to factors such as rodents, livestock, and competing vegetation. On the other hand, there are many instances where the reason is not apparent; not even the long summer drought nor the high temperatures associated with California's Mediterranean-like climate are satisfactory explanations.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1577.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu