California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.2

Spider mites on walnuts in Northern California
February 1951
Volume 5, Number 2

Research articles

Fertilization of range forage: Use of exploratory plots on range may indicate kind of fertilizer needed for optimum nutrition of forage plants
by John P. Conrad
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range fertilization experimental plots gave greatly increased yields during the past season–without additional fertilizer since the unfavorable growing season of 1949.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range fertilization experimental plots gave greatly increased yields during the past season–without additional fertilizer since the unfavorable growing season of 1949.
Lemon response to phosphate: Vegetative growth stimulated by soil application of phosphate to trees showing leaf symptoms of deficiency
by D. G. Aldrich, J. J. Coony
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part I of a two-part progress report on response of lemon trees to phosphate fertilization.
Part I of a two-part progress report on response of lemon trees to phosphate fertilization.
Sugar-beet nematode: Chemical control trials test two methods of applying soil fumigants
by D. J. Raski, M. W. Allen, Roy D. McCallum
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Plow type application of soil fumigante proved more effective than chisel type application in sugar-beet nematode control tests in light soil near San Juan but treatment was relatively expensive.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Plow type application of soil fumigante proved more effective than chisel type application in sugar-beet nematode control tests in light soil near San Juan but treatment was relatively expensive.
California orchids: Resistant to some diseases in habitat become susceptible in greenhouse
by Peter A. Ark
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orchid growing in California is a multi-million dollar industry and in the process of expansion.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orchid growing in California is a multi-million dollar industry and in the process of expansion.
Deciduous fruit and nut crops: Mild temperatures of 1958–51 winter cause concern to deciduous industry because of light crops in prospect
by Dillon S. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous fruit and nuts crops of northern California probably will be below normal in 1951.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous fruit and nuts crops of northern California probably will be below normal in 1951.
Mites on walnuts: Experimental studies with aramite for spider mite control
by Woodrow W. Middlekauff, A. E. Michelbacher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites are found frequently in large numbers on the foliage of walnuts in northern California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites are found frequently in large numbers on the foliage of walnuts in northern California.
Quality of fresh chicken meat: Causes of downgrading of chickens handled in the Los Angeles market revealed in representative survey
by Kenneth D. Naden, George A. Jackson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture as part of Western Regional Marketing Project, WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946
This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture as part of Western Regional Marketing Project, WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946
Color in tomatoes: Inheritance of pigment differences studied for true-color breeding
by J. A. Jenkins, G. Mackinney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is of practical importance to the tomato grower and processor that the tomato or its product shall have a typical, readily identifiable color associated with an accustomed standard for tomatoes. The original tomato may have such a characteristic color, but the processed product may not. This is particularly true in products containing a percentage of oily or fatty nontomato ingredients, where owing to extraction of a high proportion of tomato pigments, the color of the tomato fraction appears untypically orange.
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is of practical importance to the tomato grower and processor that the tomato or its product shall have a typical, readily identifiable color associated with an accustomed standard for tomatoes. The original tomato may have such a characteristic color, but the processed product may not. This is particularly true in products containing a percentage of oily or fatty nontomato ingredients, where owing to extraction of a high proportion of tomato pigments, the color of the tomato fraction appears untypically orange.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.2

Spider mites on walnuts in Northern California
February 1951
Volume 5, Number 2

Research articles

Fertilization of range forage: Use of exploratory plots on range may indicate kind of fertilizer needed for optimum nutrition of forage plants
by John P. Conrad
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range fertilization experimental plots gave greatly increased yields during the past season–without additional fertilizer since the unfavorable growing season of 1949.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Range fertilization experimental plots gave greatly increased yields during the past season–without additional fertilizer since the unfavorable growing season of 1949.
Lemon response to phosphate: Vegetative growth stimulated by soil application of phosphate to trees showing leaf symptoms of deficiency
by D. G. Aldrich, J. J. Coony
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part I of a two-part progress report on response of lemon trees to phosphate fertilization.
Part I of a two-part progress report on response of lemon trees to phosphate fertilization.
Sugar-beet nematode: Chemical control trials test two methods of applying soil fumigants
by D. J. Raski, M. W. Allen, Roy D. McCallum
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Plow type application of soil fumigante proved more effective than chisel type application in sugar-beet nematode control tests in light soil near San Juan but treatment was relatively expensive.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Plow type application of soil fumigante proved more effective than chisel type application in sugar-beet nematode control tests in light soil near San Juan but treatment was relatively expensive.
California orchids: Resistant to some diseases in habitat become susceptible in greenhouse
by Peter A. Ark
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orchid growing in California is a multi-million dollar industry and in the process of expansion.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Orchid growing in California is a multi-million dollar industry and in the process of expansion.
Deciduous fruit and nut crops: Mild temperatures of 1958–51 winter cause concern to deciduous industry because of light crops in prospect
by Dillon S. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous fruit and nuts crops of northern California probably will be below normal in 1951.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Deciduous fruit and nuts crops of northern California probably will be below normal in 1951.
Mites on walnuts: Experimental studies with aramite for spider mite control
by Woodrow W. Middlekauff, A. E. Michelbacher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites are found frequently in large numbers on the foliage of walnuts in northern California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spider mites are found frequently in large numbers on the foliage of walnuts in northern California.
Quality of fresh chicken meat: Causes of downgrading of chickens handled in the Los Angeles market revealed in representative survey
by Kenneth D. Naden, George A. Jackson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture as part of Western Regional Marketing Project, WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946
This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture as part of Western Regional Marketing Project, WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946
Color in tomatoes: Inheritance of pigment differences studied for true-color breeding
by J. A. Jenkins, G. Mackinney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is of practical importance to the tomato grower and processor that the tomato or its product shall have a typical, readily identifiable color associated with an accustomed standard for tomatoes. The original tomato may have such a characteristic color, but the processed product may not. This is particularly true in products containing a percentage of oily or fatty nontomato ingredients, where owing to extraction of a high proportion of tomato pigments, the color of the tomato fraction appears untypically orange.
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is of practical importance to the tomato grower and processor that the tomato or its product shall have a typical, readily identifiable color associated with an accustomed standard for tomatoes. The original tomato may have such a characteristic color, but the processed product may not. This is particularly true in products containing a percentage of oily or fatty nontomato ingredients, where owing to extraction of a high proportion of tomato pigments, the color of the tomato fraction appears untypically orange.

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