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Color in tomatoes: Inheritance of pigment differences studied for true-color breeding

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Authors

J. A. Jenkins, University of California College of Agriculture
G. Mackinney, University of California College of Agriculture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 5(2):13-14.

Published February 01, 1951

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Abstract

It is of practical importance to the tomato grower and processor that the tomato or its product shall have a typical, readily identifiable color associated with an accustomed standard for tomatoes. The original tomato may have such a characteristic color, but the processed product may not. This is particularly true in products containing a percentage of oily or fatty nontomato ingredients, where owing to extraction of a high proportion of tomato pigments, the color of the tomato fraction appears untypically orange.

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Color in tomatoes: Inheritance of pigment differences studied for true-color breeding

J. A. Jenkins, G. Mackinney
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Color in tomatoes: Inheritance of pigment differences studied for true-color breeding

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. A. Jenkins, University of California College of Agriculture
G. Mackinney, University of California College of Agriculture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 5(2):13-14.

Published February 01, 1951

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

It is of practical importance to the tomato grower and processor that the tomato or its product shall have a typical, readily identifiable color associated with an accustomed standard for tomatoes. The original tomato may have such a characteristic color, but the processed product may not. This is particularly true in products containing a percentage of oily or fatty nontomato ingredients, where owing to extraction of a high proportion of tomato pigments, the color of the tomato fraction appears untypically orange.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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