California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.1

Range grass reseeding experiments
January 1951
Volume 5, Number 1

Research articles

Fruit cooker: Juices, purees, pastes produced by modernized proven process
by J.B.S. Braverman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Processors of certain fruits and vegetables can steam scald, crush, preheat the crushed fruit, extract the juice, and flash pasteurize after screening in one operation by the use of a modified Henze cooker.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Processors of certain fruits and vegetables can steam scald, crush, preheat the crushed fruit, extract the juice, and flash pasteurize after screening in one operation by the use of a modified Henze cooker.
Rootstocks affect orange sizes: Effect on fruit size should be considered when selecting rootstocks for Washington navels and Valencias
by W. P. Bitters, L. D. Batchelor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The size of oranges is influenced by the nature of the rootstocks on which the trees are budded.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The size of oranges is influenced by the nature of the rootstocks on which the trees are budded.
Grape bud mite injury: Effect of pruning date on incidence of injury investigated near Cucamonga in 1949–50 season
by M. M. Barnes, A. A. McCornack
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spraying trials have been conducted in southern California over a period of three years concerning control of the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of the grape erineum mite–Eriophyes vitis– (Pgst.). During this period approximately 55 acres of plots have failed to provide information concerning the prevention by spraying of the injury caused by this mite. This is because of the erratic nature of the appearance of bud mite symptoms.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spraying trials have been conducted in southern California over a period of three years concerning control of the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of the grape erineum mite–Eriophyes vitis– (Pgst.). During this period approximately 55 acres of plots have failed to provide information concerning the prevention by spraying of the injury caused by this mite. This is because of the erratic nature of the appearance of bud mite symptoms.
Summer squash harvest time: Growth rates and chemical composition of fruits of four varieties studied to determine optimum harvest time
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth rate and chemical composition studies of summer squash should help growers to determine the frequency of harvest, and nutritionists to learn more about the relationship of maturity to quality and food value.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth rate and chemical composition studies of summer squash should help growers to determine the frequency of harvest, and nutritionists to learn more about the relationship of maturity to quality and food value.
Broad bean weevil: Control of pest may restore the once important fava bean crop
by Woodrow W. Middlekauff, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A drop in annual production from between 40,000 and 50,000 100-pound bags of broad–fava–beans in San Mateo County before 1920 to a total of 847 100-pound bags in 1949 was caused by the spread of the broad bean weevil, Bruchus rufimanus Boh. through the central coast area from San Francisco Bay south to San Luis Obispo.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A drop in annual production from between 40,000 and 50,000 100-pound bags of broad–fava–beans in San Mateo County before 1920 to a total of 847 100-pound bags in 1949 was caused by the spread of the broad bean weevil, Bruchus rufimanus Boh. through the central coast area from San Francisco Bay south to San Luis Obispo.
Range grass and reseeding experiments in California: Complexity of range improvement problem requires long-term research program involving allied fields of study
by R. Merton Love
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: More than 2,900 accessions of forage plants–including grasses, legumes, and forbs–have been tested at Davis and at Berkeley in a long-term research program. In 1950, 90 species and varieties were planted which have never before been tried in California. These included 40 strains of subterranean clover.
Not available – first paragraph follows: More than 2,900 accessions of forage plants–including grasses, legumes, and forbs–have been tested at Davis and at Berkeley in a long-term research program. In 1950, 90 species and varieties were planted which have never before been tried in California. These included 40 strains of subterranean clover.
Diseases of the loganberry: Susceptible to several virus and fungus diseases Logan is immune to Verticillium wilt and powdery mildew
by Stephen Wilhelm, H. Earl Thomas, Edward C. Koch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field tests carried on for four years have shown that the Loganberry is not affected by Verticillium wilt, the most serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties. The Logan therefore can be grown on land cropped previously to tomatoes, potatoes or other susceptible crops without danger of wilt losses, and can even be intercropped the first year with tomatoes. The Loganberry is also immune to powdery mildew, a serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties in the coastal berry growing districts of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field tests carried on for four years have shown that the Loganberry is not affected by Verticillium wilt, the most serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties. The Logan therefore can be grown on land cropped previously to tomatoes, potatoes or other susceptible crops without danger of wilt losses, and can even be intercropped the first year with tomatoes. The Loganberry is also immune to powdery mildew, a serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties in the coastal berry growing districts of California.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.1

Range grass reseeding experiments
January 1951
Volume 5, Number 1

Research articles

Fruit cooker: Juices, purees, pastes produced by modernized proven process
by J.B.S. Braverman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Processors of certain fruits and vegetables can steam scald, crush, preheat the crushed fruit, extract the juice, and flash pasteurize after screening in one operation by the use of a modified Henze cooker.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Processors of certain fruits and vegetables can steam scald, crush, preheat the crushed fruit, extract the juice, and flash pasteurize after screening in one operation by the use of a modified Henze cooker.
Rootstocks affect orange sizes: Effect on fruit size should be considered when selecting rootstocks for Washington navels and Valencias
by W. P. Bitters, L. D. Batchelor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The size of oranges is influenced by the nature of the rootstocks on which the trees are budded.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The size of oranges is influenced by the nature of the rootstocks on which the trees are budded.
Grape bud mite injury: Effect of pruning date on incidence of injury investigated near Cucamonga in 1949–50 season
by M. M. Barnes, A. A. McCornack
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spraying trials have been conducted in southern California over a period of three years concerning control of the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of the grape erineum mite–Eriophyes vitis– (Pgst.). During this period approximately 55 acres of plots have failed to provide information concerning the prevention by spraying of the injury caused by this mite. This is because of the erratic nature of the appearance of bud mite symptoms.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spraying trials have been conducted in southern California over a period of three years concerning control of the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of the grape erineum mite–Eriophyes vitis– (Pgst.). During this period approximately 55 acres of plots have failed to provide information concerning the prevention by spraying of the injury caused by this mite. This is because of the erratic nature of the appearance of bud mite symptoms.
Summer squash harvest time: Growth rates and chemical composition of fruits of four varieties studied to determine optimum harvest time
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth rate and chemical composition studies of summer squash should help growers to determine the frequency of harvest, and nutritionists to learn more about the relationship of maturity to quality and food value.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Growth rate and chemical composition studies of summer squash should help growers to determine the frequency of harvest, and nutritionists to learn more about the relationship of maturity to quality and food value.
Broad bean weevil: Control of pest may restore the once important fava bean crop
by Woodrow W. Middlekauff, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A drop in annual production from between 40,000 and 50,000 100-pound bags of broad–fava–beans in San Mateo County before 1920 to a total of 847 100-pound bags in 1949 was caused by the spread of the broad bean weevil, Bruchus rufimanus Boh. through the central coast area from San Francisco Bay south to San Luis Obispo.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A drop in annual production from between 40,000 and 50,000 100-pound bags of broad–fava–beans in San Mateo County before 1920 to a total of 847 100-pound bags in 1949 was caused by the spread of the broad bean weevil, Bruchus rufimanus Boh. through the central coast area from San Francisco Bay south to San Luis Obispo.
Range grass and reseeding experiments in California: Complexity of range improvement problem requires long-term research program involving allied fields of study
by R. Merton Love
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: More than 2,900 accessions of forage plants–including grasses, legumes, and forbs–have been tested at Davis and at Berkeley in a long-term research program. In 1950, 90 species and varieties were planted which have never before been tried in California. These included 40 strains of subterranean clover.
Not available – first paragraph follows: More than 2,900 accessions of forage plants–including grasses, legumes, and forbs–have been tested at Davis and at Berkeley in a long-term research program. In 1950, 90 species and varieties were planted which have never before been tried in California. These included 40 strains of subterranean clover.
Diseases of the loganberry: Susceptible to several virus and fungus diseases Logan is immune to Verticillium wilt and powdery mildew
by Stephen Wilhelm, H. Earl Thomas, Edward C. Koch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field tests carried on for four years have shown that the Loganberry is not affected by Verticillium wilt, the most serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties. The Logan therefore can be grown on land cropped previously to tomatoes, potatoes or other susceptible crops without danger of wilt losses, and can even be intercropped the first year with tomatoes. The Loganberry is also immune to powdery mildew, a serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties in the coastal berry growing districts of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field tests carried on for four years have shown that the Loganberry is not affected by Verticillium wilt, the most serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties. The Logan therefore can be grown on land cropped previously to tomatoes, potatoes or other susceptible crops without danger of wilt losses, and can even be intercropped the first year with tomatoes. The Loganberry is also immune to powdery mildew, a serious disease of the Boysen and Young varieties in the coastal berry growing districts of California.

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