California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

May 1980
Volume 34, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Producing gas from crop residues
by John R. Goss, Raymond H. Coppock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A pilot model downdraft gasifier demonstrated the feasibility of using crop and wood residues to produce low-Btu gas.A pilot model downdraft gasifier demonstrated the feasibility of producing low-Btu gas from nutshells, wood chips, and other timber and crop residues. Rice straw was not satisfactory because of silicon content.
Rural rebound: Newcomers revitalize small towns
by Gala Rinaldi, Edward Vine, Edward J. Blakely, Ted K. Bradshaw
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Small-town economies have rebounded with the influx of new residents from cities, who bring with them skills, professional backgrounds, or retirement incomes.
Suppressive soil reduces carnation disease
by Arthur H. McCain, Lyle E. Pyeatt, Thomas G. Byrne, Delbert S. Farnham
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Small amounts of Fusarium wilt-suppressive soils added to greenhouse soils effectively reduced plant loss.Fusarium wilt disease is suppressed by some soils. As little as ?h percent by volume of these soils added to Fusarium-infested greenhouse soils effectively reduced loss of carnations to the disease.
Synthetic pyrethroids effective against fowl mite
by Edmond C. Loomis, Lorry L. Dunning
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Northern fowl mites were controlled for up to three months on chickens sprayed with a synthetic pyrethroid.Most chickens sprayed with the synthetic pyrethroid permethrin remained mite-free for up to three months in trials to control northern fowl mite.
Dimethoate-resistant spider mite predator survives field tests
by Richard T. Roush, William L. Peacock, Donald L. Flaherty, Marjorie A. Hoy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Laboratory-induced resistance of spider mite predators to dimethoate has been shown to persist in nature, but the level of resistance is unsatisfactory at current vineyard pesticide application rates.
Nitrogen stabilizer gives mixed results
by Robert W. Hagemann, Roland D. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sugarbeets responded, but wheat and bermudagrass did not, to the addition of a nitrogen stabilizer to fertilizer nitrogen.N-Serve injected into the soil with ammonia-nitrogen increased root and sucrose yields of sugar beets but failed to increase wheat grain or bermudagrass yields.
Subsurface herbicide layer controls yellow nutsedge
by Harry L. Carlson, James E. Hill, Harry S. Agamalian, Philip P. Osterli, Robert J. Mullen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A layer of herbicide applied by spray blade below the soil surface acted as a barrier to emerging yellow nutsedge long enough for beans to become established.
Control of the grapeleaf skeletonizer
by Vernon M. Stern, Donald L. Flaherty, William L. Peacock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Carefully timed chemical applications will control the destructive skeletonizer gradually spreading through California vineyards.Gradually spreading northward, this devastating vineyard pest is easily controlled with chemicals used against lepidopterous larvae on grapes. Timing is important.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

The university-industry connection
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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May 1980
Volume 34, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Producing gas from crop residues
by John R. Goss, Raymond H. Coppock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A pilot model downdraft gasifier demonstrated the feasibility of using crop and wood residues to produce low-Btu gas.A pilot model downdraft gasifier demonstrated the feasibility of producing low-Btu gas from nutshells, wood chips, and other timber and crop residues. Rice straw was not satisfactory because of silicon content.
Rural rebound: Newcomers revitalize small towns
by Gala Rinaldi, Edward Vine, Edward J. Blakely, Ted K. Bradshaw
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Small-town economies have rebounded with the influx of new residents from cities, who bring with them skills, professional backgrounds, or retirement incomes.
Suppressive soil reduces carnation disease
by Arthur H. McCain, Lyle E. Pyeatt, Thomas G. Byrne, Delbert S. Farnham
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Small amounts of Fusarium wilt-suppressive soils added to greenhouse soils effectively reduced plant loss.Fusarium wilt disease is suppressed by some soils. As little as ?h percent by volume of these soils added to Fusarium-infested greenhouse soils effectively reduced loss of carnations to the disease.
Synthetic pyrethroids effective against fowl mite
by Edmond C. Loomis, Lorry L. Dunning
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Northern fowl mites were controlled for up to three months on chickens sprayed with a synthetic pyrethroid.Most chickens sprayed with the synthetic pyrethroid permethrin remained mite-free for up to three months in trials to control northern fowl mite.
Dimethoate-resistant spider mite predator survives field tests
by Richard T. Roush, William L. Peacock, Donald L. Flaherty, Marjorie A. Hoy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Laboratory-induced resistance of spider mite predators to dimethoate has been shown to persist in nature, but the level of resistance is unsatisfactory at current vineyard pesticide application rates.
Nitrogen stabilizer gives mixed results
by Robert W. Hagemann, Roland D. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Sugarbeets responded, but wheat and bermudagrass did not, to the addition of a nitrogen stabilizer to fertilizer nitrogen.N-Serve injected into the soil with ammonia-nitrogen increased root and sucrose yields of sugar beets but failed to increase wheat grain or bermudagrass yields.
Subsurface herbicide layer controls yellow nutsedge
by Harry L. Carlson, James E. Hill, Harry S. Agamalian, Philip P. Osterli, Robert J. Mullen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A layer of herbicide applied by spray blade below the soil surface acted as a barrier to emerging yellow nutsedge long enough for beans to become established.
Control of the grapeleaf skeletonizer
by Vernon M. Stern, Donald L. Flaherty, William L. Peacock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Carefully timed chemical applications will control the destructive skeletonizer gradually spreading through California vineyards.Gradually spreading northward, this devastating vineyard pest is easily controlled with chemicals used against lepidopterous larvae on grapes. Timing is important.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

The university-industry connection
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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