California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

April 1980
Volume 34, Number 4

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Rose clover controls erosion in southern California
by Walter L. Graves, Burgess L. Kay, Tom Ham
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Early-maturing rose clovers seem more suited than annual grasses to southern California's variable winter rainfall and early cutoff of rains in the spring. They've performed well on roadside embankments in the San Diego area.
Insecticides against Nantucket pine tip moth
by Leland R. Brown, Clark O. Eads
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Four sprays of Zectran, phosalone, acephate, or dimethoate controlled Nantucket pine tip moth damage to Monterey pines in southern California Christmas tree studies.
The courtship of the elm bark beetle
by Pavel Svihra, Jack Kelly Clark
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Disproving a previous assumption about the beetle's courtship behavior may lead to new ways of controlling Dutch elm disease.New information on the courtship behavior of the smaller European elm bark beetle may lead to improved control strategies against Dutch elm disease.
Farmers' markets please their customers
by Robert Sommer, Margaret Wing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fresh produce, price savings, and social atmosphere are sources of satisfaction to customers of certified farmers' markets in California.
Spikerush may help control waterweeds
by Richard R. Yeo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some species of spikerush form large mats of lawnlike sod underwater, choking out and replacing waterweeds in canals and reservoirs.
Injuries cause deterioration of sweet cherries
by F. Gordon Mitchell, Gene Mayer, Adel A. Kader
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vibration and impact injuries hasten deterioration of harvested sweet cherries and increase fruit rot.In laboratory tests, physical injuries similar to those that occur in commercial handling and marketing measurably increased deterioration of sweet cherries. Vibration caused the greatest damage.
Infested soil as a potential resource
by Cecil E. Yarwood
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
For each soil pathogen there may be several plant species, including crop plants, that are not only resistant to the pathogen, but stimulated by it. Greenhouse tests with one are reported here.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Clearing away confusion about agricultural research
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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April 1980
Volume 34, Number 4

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Rose clover controls erosion in southern California
by Walter L. Graves, Burgess L. Kay, Tom Ham
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Early-maturing rose clovers seem more suited than annual grasses to southern California's variable winter rainfall and early cutoff of rains in the spring. They've performed well on roadside embankments in the San Diego area.
Insecticides against Nantucket pine tip moth
by Leland R. Brown, Clark O. Eads
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Four sprays of Zectran, phosalone, acephate, or dimethoate controlled Nantucket pine tip moth damage to Monterey pines in southern California Christmas tree studies.
The courtship of the elm bark beetle
by Pavel Svihra, Jack Kelly Clark
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Disproving a previous assumption about the beetle's courtship behavior may lead to new ways of controlling Dutch elm disease.New information on the courtship behavior of the smaller European elm bark beetle may lead to improved control strategies against Dutch elm disease.
Farmers' markets please their customers
by Robert Sommer, Margaret Wing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fresh produce, price savings, and social atmosphere are sources of satisfaction to customers of certified farmers' markets in California.
Spikerush may help control waterweeds
by Richard R. Yeo
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some species of spikerush form large mats of lawnlike sod underwater, choking out and replacing waterweeds in canals and reservoirs.
Injuries cause deterioration of sweet cherries
by F. Gordon Mitchell, Gene Mayer, Adel A. Kader
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Vibration and impact injuries hasten deterioration of harvested sweet cherries and increase fruit rot.In laboratory tests, physical injuries similar to those that occur in commercial handling and marketing measurably increased deterioration of sweet cherries. Vibration caused the greatest damage.
Infested soil as a potential resource
by Cecil E. Yarwood
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
For each soil pathogen there may be several plant species, including crop plants, that are not only resistant to the pathogen, but stimulated by it. Greenhouse tests with one are reported here.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Clearing away confusion about agricultural research
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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