California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

March 1980
Volume 34, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Progress in mosquito control
by Russell E. Fontaine
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Public health: Control of mosquito-borne encephalitis
by William C. Reeves, Marilyn Milby, James L. Hardy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The mosquito control program in California has been uniquely successful, and for practical purposes, the major mosquito-borne diseases, such as encephalitis and malaria, have been effectively controlled in the state in recent years. Much of the original research leading to this success was done by the University of California School of Public Health. Current research is directed at preventing a resurgence of mosquito-borne diseases, with emphasis on surveillance and vector suppression.The major mosquito-borne diseases have been effectively controlled in California. Research i s now directed at preventing their resurgence.
Public health: Mosquitoes as carriers of viral diseases
by James L. Hardy, Edward J. Houk, Laura D. Kramer, Richard P. Meyer
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Public health: Treehole mosquito may spread canine heartworm
by Richard Garcia, Clarence J. Weinmann
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Public health: Encephalitis viruses persist in southern California
by Telford H. Work
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Mosquitoes—a by-product of rice culture
by Robert K. Washino
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Research on mosquito biology and ecology yields fundamental knowledge of the behavior, habits, breeding preferences, flight range, survival rates, and other characteristics of pest and disease-vector mosquitoes-information essential for effective planning and execution of control programs. Ecological studies assume greater importance in California than elsewhere because of the state's diverse climate and topography. Forty-nine mosquito species are found here, of which six are confirmed disease vectors.Knowledge of the behavior and characteristics o f mosquitoes i s the first step in finding more effective control methods.
Biology, ecology and ethology: Tracking the pasture mosquito
by G. A. H. McClelland
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Mosquitoes from trees
by John R. Anderson, Richard Garcia, G. A. H. McClelland
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Winter mosquitoes go underground in summer
by Mir S. Mulla
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Feeding mechanisms and nutrition of mosquitoes
by R. H. Dadd
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: BTI — a potent new biological weapon
by Irvin M. Hall, Mir S. Mulla, Charles H. Schaefer, Richard Garcia, Brian A. Federici
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Control of mosquitoes through exploitation of their natural enemies to suppress them has been given high priority in California for many years. More studies have been approved and more funds expended on biological controls than on any other research category. Investigations have been pursued on a broad range of bioagents—mosquito predator fish, aquatic insects, fungal and bacterial pathogens, and nematode parasites. Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (BTI) is an exciting new bioagent under study and has prospects of becoming an important adjunct to biological control.Research on use of natural enemies t o suppress mosquitoes has had high priority in California for many years. New biocontrol agents offer exciting possibilities.
Biological control and genetics: Notonectids
by Richard Garcia
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Pupfish
by Forrest C. Cress
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Hydra
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Flatworms
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Mosquito fish — an established predator
by Graham A. E. Gall, Joseph J. Cech, Richard Garcia, Vincent H. Resh, Robert K. Washino
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Genetic manipulation of mosquitoes
by Sister Monica Asman, Paul T. McDonald, Frank G. Zalom
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Using sterile males to reduce mosquito numbers
by John R. Anderson, Sister Monica Asman
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Fungi show promise in biological control
by Brian A. Federici, Joyce Fetter-Lasko, George Soares, Pamela W. Tsao
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Nematodes as biological control agents
by Edward G. Platzer
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Conventional and nonconventional chemicals for mosquito control
by Charles H. Schaefer, Mir S. Mulla
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although they have fallen into disfavor because of mosquito resistance and other problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective way to suppress mosquitoes. The thrust of nearly all University research in this area is on the development and evaluation of narrow spectrum insecticides that selectively kill mosquitoes with minimal injury to natural enemies and nontarget species. Promising new developments include insect growth regulators, which interfere with the growth processes of the mosquito larvae, juvenile hormones, mosquito attractants, repellents, and other substances derived from natural products.Despite problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective means of mosquit control. University scientists are working on narrow-spectrum insecticides that kill mosquitoes but don't harm other species.
Chemical control: Developing better larvicides
by Mir S. Mulla, Charles H. Schaefer
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Cold fogging for mosquito control
by Norman B. Akesson
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Chemicals of the future
by Yih-Shen Hwang, Mir S. Mulla
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Mosquito resistance to insecticides
by George P. Georghiou
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Immunochemical methods to detect pesticide residues
by Keith D. Wing, Bruce D. Hammock
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Physical and cultural control: Reclaiming alkali soils to reduce mosquito breeding sites
by Charles H. Schaefer, William E. Wildman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Physical control involves modification of the environment to reduce or eliminate mosquito breeding places: drainage, diking, filling, leveling, or other engineering works. Cultural control aims for mosquito reduction through management of soils and vegetation that contribute to mosquito problems. Researchers are investigating the effects of conventional drainage and ditching practices on natural flow and fauna in salt marshes and studying ways to reclaim impermeable alkali soils, which are important sources of mosquitoes in some areas.Physical and cultural control methods seek to reduce mosquito breeding sources, whileminimizing possible adverse effects on the environment.
Physical and cultural control: Mosquito and fly problems in dairy waste-water systems
by Edmond C. Loomis, Richard N. Eide, James R. Caton, Donald A. Merritt
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Physical and cultural control: Ecological impact of marshland recirculation ditches
by Vincent H. Resh, Steven S. Balling, Mark A. Barnby, Joshua N. Collins
Full text HTML  | PDF  

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Public service research at its best
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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March 1980
Volume 34, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Progress in mosquito control
by Russell E. Fontaine
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Public health: Control of mosquito-borne encephalitis
by William C. Reeves, Marilyn Milby, James L. Hardy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The mosquito control program in California has been uniquely successful, and for practical purposes, the major mosquito-borne diseases, such as encephalitis and malaria, have been effectively controlled in the state in recent years. Much of the original research leading to this success was done by the University of California School of Public Health. Current research is directed at preventing a resurgence of mosquito-borne diseases, with emphasis on surveillance and vector suppression.The major mosquito-borne diseases have been effectively controlled in California. Research i s now directed at preventing their resurgence.
Public health: Mosquitoes as carriers of viral diseases
by James L. Hardy, Edward J. Houk, Laura D. Kramer, Richard P. Meyer
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Public health: Treehole mosquito may spread canine heartworm
by Richard Garcia, Clarence J. Weinmann
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Public health: Encephalitis viruses persist in southern California
by Telford H. Work
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Mosquitoes—a by-product of rice culture
by Robert K. Washino
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Research on mosquito biology and ecology yields fundamental knowledge of the behavior, habits, breeding preferences, flight range, survival rates, and other characteristics of pest and disease-vector mosquitoes-information essential for effective planning and execution of control programs. Ecological studies assume greater importance in California than elsewhere because of the state's diverse climate and topography. Forty-nine mosquito species are found here, of which six are confirmed disease vectors.Knowledge of the behavior and characteristics o f mosquitoes i s the first step in finding more effective control methods.
Biology, ecology and ethology: Tracking the pasture mosquito
by G. A. H. McClelland
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Mosquitoes from trees
by John R. Anderson, Richard Garcia, G. A. H. McClelland
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Winter mosquitoes go underground in summer
by Mir S. Mulla
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biology, ecology and ethology: Feeding mechanisms and nutrition of mosquitoes
by R. H. Dadd
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: BTI — a potent new biological weapon
by Irvin M. Hall, Mir S. Mulla, Charles H. Schaefer, Richard Garcia, Brian A. Federici
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Control of mosquitoes through exploitation of their natural enemies to suppress them has been given high priority in California for many years. More studies have been approved and more funds expended on biological controls than on any other research category. Investigations have been pursued on a broad range of bioagents—mosquito predator fish, aquatic insects, fungal and bacterial pathogens, and nematode parasites. Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (BTI) is an exciting new bioagent under study and has prospects of becoming an important adjunct to biological control.Research on use of natural enemies t o suppress mosquitoes has had high priority in California for many years. New biocontrol agents offer exciting possibilities.
Biological control and genetics: Notonectids
by Richard Garcia
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Pupfish
by Forrest C. Cress
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Hydra
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Flatworms
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Mosquito fish — an established predator
by Graham A. E. Gall, Joseph J. Cech, Richard Garcia, Vincent H. Resh, Robert K. Washino
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Genetic manipulation of mosquitoes
by Sister Monica Asman, Paul T. McDonald, Frank G. Zalom
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Using sterile males to reduce mosquito numbers
by John R. Anderson, Sister Monica Asman
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Fungi show promise in biological control
by Brian A. Federici, Joyce Fetter-Lasko, George Soares, Pamela W. Tsao
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Biological control and genetics: Nematodes as biological control agents
by Edward G. Platzer
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Conventional and nonconventional chemicals for mosquito control
by Charles H. Schaefer, Mir S. Mulla
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although they have fallen into disfavor because of mosquito resistance and other problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective way to suppress mosquitoes. The thrust of nearly all University research in this area is on the development and evaluation of narrow spectrum insecticides that selectively kill mosquitoes with minimal injury to natural enemies and nontarget species. Promising new developments include insect growth regulators, which interfere with the growth processes of the mosquito larvae, juvenile hormones, mosquito attractants, repellents, and other substances derived from natural products.Despite problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective means of mosquit control. University scientists are working on narrow-spectrum insecticides that kill mosquitoes but don't harm other species.
Chemical control: Developing better larvicides
by Mir S. Mulla, Charles H. Schaefer
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Cold fogging for mosquito control
by Norman B. Akesson
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Chemicals of the future
by Yih-Shen Hwang, Mir S. Mulla
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Mosquito resistance to insecticides
by George P. Georghiou
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemical control: Immunochemical methods to detect pesticide residues
by Keith D. Wing, Bruce D. Hammock
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Physical and cultural control: Reclaiming alkali soils to reduce mosquito breeding sites
by Charles H. Schaefer, William E. Wildman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Physical control involves modification of the environment to reduce or eliminate mosquito breeding places: drainage, diking, filling, leveling, or other engineering works. Cultural control aims for mosquito reduction through management of soils and vegetation that contribute to mosquito problems. Researchers are investigating the effects of conventional drainage and ditching practices on natural flow and fauna in salt marshes and studying ways to reclaim impermeable alkali soils, which are important sources of mosquitoes in some areas.Physical and cultural control methods seek to reduce mosquito breeding sources, whileminimizing possible adverse effects on the environment.
Physical and cultural control: Mosquito and fly problems in dairy waste-water systems
by Edmond C. Loomis, Richard N. Eide, James R. Caton, Donald A. Merritt
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Physical and cultural control: Ecological impact of marshland recirculation ditches
by Vincent H. Resh, Steven S. Balling, Mark A. Barnby, Joshua N. Collins
Full text HTML  | PDF  

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Public service research at its best
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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