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California Agriculture
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Biological control and genetics: BTI — a potent new biological weapon

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Authors

Richard Garcia, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720
Brian A. Federici, University of California, Riverside
Irvin M. Hall, University of California, Riverside
Mir S. Mulla, University of California, Riverside
Charles H. Schaefer, University of California, stationed at the Fresno Mosquito Control Research Laboratory

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(3):17-19.

Published March 01, 1980

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Abstract

Control of mosquitoes through exploitation of their natural enemies to suppress them has been given high priority in California for many years. More studies have been approved and more funds expended on biological controls than on any other research category. Investigations have been pursued on a broad range of bioagents—mosquito predator fish, aquatic insects, fungal and bacterial pathogens, and nematode parasites.

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Biological control and genetics: BTI — a potent new biological weapon

Richard Garcia, Brian A. Federici, Irvin M. Hall, Mir S. Mulla, Charles H. Schaefer
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Biological control and genetics: BTI — a potent new biological weapon

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Richard Garcia, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720
Brian A. Federici, University of California, Riverside
Irvin M. Hall, University of California, Riverside
Mir S. Mulla, University of California, Riverside
Charles H. Schaefer, University of California, stationed at the Fresno Mosquito Control Research Laboratory

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(3):17-19.

Published March 01, 1980

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Control of mosquitoes through exploitation of their natural enemies to suppress them has been given high priority in California for many years. More studies have been approved and more funds expended on biological controls than on any other research category. Investigations have been pursued on a broad range of bioagents—mosquito predator fish, aquatic insects, fungal and bacterial pathogens, and nematode parasites.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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