California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

February 1980
Volume 34, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Rice straw burning: Alternative policy implications
by Richard L. Nelson, Peter K. Thor, Christine R. Heaton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Burning rice straw, the residue of harvesting, pollutes the air and is possibly hazardous to health, but other alternatives proposed so far would place a heavy economic burden on growers who may not be able to pass their expenses on to consumers. The most likely long-term solution will be to find a way to utilize rice straw, possibly, for example, as fodder for cattle.
Of men and machines: Technological change and people in agriculture Part II: Changes in hired farm labor and in rural communities
by Ann Foley Scheuring, Orville E. Thompson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not only have changes occurred in the way farms and farm families are run (see January 1980 issue of California Agriculture), but there have been dramatic changes within a single generation in the handling of hired labor (there is less need for it) and in the composition of rural communities (more Spanish-speaking residents are settling down, particularly in the Central Valley). This is the last of two articles on the subject.
California olives: Situation and outlook
by Leon Garoyan, Lynn Horel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Wide fluctuations in yield have resulted in an unstable market for growers.For 16 years California's olive production was fairly stable, but since 1976 production has soared, resulting in lower returns to growers. Several prospects for improving the situation in the long run are in view, however.
Six new strawberry varieties released
by Royce S. Bringhurst, Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The six newly developed strawberry varieties recently announced by University of California researchers are described in detail. Three are “day-neutral” types suitable for cultivation by home gardeners and three are “short-day” types intended for commercial growers seeking to supply early markets.
Blue alfalfa aphid: Economic threshold levels in southern California
by Raj Sharma, Vern Stern
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A deceptively low count on new regrowth may signal a population buildup and potential crop loss.An invader from the Orient, the blue alfalfa aphid, is proving far more damaging to alfalfa than the pea aphid, especially when no natural enemies are present. Fortunately, it is easy to kill with the materials registered for controlling other types of aphids on alfalfa.
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February 1980
Volume 34, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Rice straw burning: Alternative policy implications
by Richard L. Nelson, Peter K. Thor, Christine R. Heaton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Burning rice straw, the residue of harvesting, pollutes the air and is possibly hazardous to health, but other alternatives proposed so far would place a heavy economic burden on growers who may not be able to pass their expenses on to consumers. The most likely long-term solution will be to find a way to utilize rice straw, possibly, for example, as fodder for cattle.
Of men and machines: Technological change and people in agriculture Part II: Changes in hired farm labor and in rural communities
by Ann Foley Scheuring, Orville E. Thompson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not only have changes occurred in the way farms and farm families are run (see January 1980 issue of California Agriculture), but there have been dramatic changes within a single generation in the handling of hired labor (there is less need for it) and in the composition of rural communities (more Spanish-speaking residents are settling down, particularly in the Central Valley). This is the last of two articles on the subject.
California olives: Situation and outlook
by Leon Garoyan, Lynn Horel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Wide fluctuations in yield have resulted in an unstable market for growers.For 16 years California's olive production was fairly stable, but since 1976 production has soared, resulting in lower returns to growers. Several prospects for improving the situation in the long run are in view, however.
Six new strawberry varieties released
by Royce S. Bringhurst, Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The six newly developed strawberry varieties recently announced by University of California researchers are described in detail. Three are “day-neutral” types suitable for cultivation by home gardeners and three are “short-day” types intended for commercial growers seeking to supply early markets.
Blue alfalfa aphid: Economic threshold levels in southern California
by Raj Sharma, Vern Stern
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A deceptively low count on new regrowth may signal a population buildup and potential crop loss.An invader from the Orient, the blue alfalfa aphid, is proving far more damaging to alfalfa than the pea aphid, especially when no natural enemies are present. Fortunately, it is easy to kill with the materials registered for controlling other types of aphids on alfalfa.

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