California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.10

Bulk-filling plums for interstate shipment
October 1959
Volume 13, Number 10

Research articles

Red sports of delicious apple: Reversion to striped fruit can be minimized by selecting red sports and using scion wood from nonreverted trees
by Dillon S. Brown, Claron O. Hesse, Edward C. Koch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The red sport of the Delicious apple most commonly planted in California is Starking. Richared Delicious has been planted on only a limited acreage since it colors later than Starking. The popularity of Starking has declined, however, because many trees or parts of trees have reverted toward the parent Delicious type and produce fruit less highly colored. Reverted fruit appears distinctly striped. Though lighter red, the stripes are prominent on reverted fruit because of the lack of the characteristic red background of the normal Starking. The reverted Starking is often called Stripes, or Common Delicious, as opposed to Double-red for well-colored fruit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The red sport of the Delicious apple most commonly planted in California is Starking. Richared Delicious has been planted on only a limited acreage since it colors later than Starking. The popularity of Starking has declined, however, because many trees or parts of trees have reverted toward the parent Delicious type and produce fruit less highly colored. Reverted fruit appears distinctly striped. Though lighter red, the stripes are prominent on reverted fruit because of the lack of the characteristic red background of the normal Starking. The reverted Starking is often called Stripes, or Common Delicious, as opposed to Double-red for well-colored fruit.
Optimum time for olive harvest: Fruit size and texture at harvest have important influence on the quality of black-ripe and green-ripe processed olives
by H. T. Hartmann, Marion Simone, R. H. Vaughn, E. C. Maxie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies conducted for three years, with several varieties of olives, were designed to determine the stage of fruit maturity at harvest that would result in the highest quality of black-ripe and green-ripe processed fruit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies conducted for three years, with several varieties of olives, were designed to determine the stage of fruit maturity at harvest that would result in the highest quality of black-ripe and green-ripe processed fruit.
Spiraled heads in lettuce: Malformation in Great Lakes lettuce strains apparently an inherited character producing united wrapper leaf margins
by F. W. Zink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Great Lakes lettuce, adapted to culture under a range of environmental conditions, normally produces a medium-large, globular, semi-exposed head. In some plantings, however, a percentage of the plant population develops conical-shaped heads, with the wrapper leaves or head leaves in a spiral-like fold. Market-stage plants of this type are generally referred to as spiraled heads. The shipper and retailer prefer a slightly oblate head with broad, flat butt, which can be packed evenly and firmly.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Great Lakes lettuce, adapted to culture under a range of environmental conditions, normally produces a medium-large, globular, semi-exposed head. In some plantings, however, a percentage of the plant population develops conical-shaped heads, with the wrapper leaves or head leaves in a spiral-like fold. Market-stage plants of this type are generally referred to as spiraled heads. The shipper and retailer prefer a slightly oblate head with broad, flat butt, which can be packed evenly and firmly.
Summer flooding of alfalfa: Disease induced by excessive flooding of fields during high temperatures is major factor in annual depletion of stands
by D. C. Erwin, W. F. Lehman, B. W. Kennedy, G. F. Worker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa stands in the Imperial and Palo Verde valleys of southern California often need to be replanted each year.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa stands in the Imperial and Palo Verde valleys of southern California often need to be replanted each year.
Alfalfa meal in swine rations: Tested as source of energy one pound of alfalfa had an average replacement value for 0.28 pound of concentrate
by Hubert Heitman, J. H. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The value of alfalfa meal as a source of energy for swine was determined for three levels of meal–5%, 20%, and 40% of the ration; three stages of plant maturity–16% bud, 3% bloom, and 34% bloom; and three methods of preparation–suncured, dehydrated, and pelleted dehydrated, reground.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The value of alfalfa meal as a source of energy for swine was determined for three levels of meal–5%, 20%, and 40% of the ration; three stages of plant maturity–16% bud, 3% bloom, and 34% bloom; and three methods of preparation–suncured, dehydrated, and pelleted dehydrated, reground.
Control of the brown dog tick: Two new insecticides control infestations of pest in kennels and on dogs without adverse effects on animals or humans
by I. Barry Tarshis, Michael R. Dunn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brown dog ticks have become resistant to a number of the standard insecticides. Pet owners, veterinarians, and kennel operators have asked for new compounds for tick control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brown dog ticks have become resistant to a number of the standard insecticides. Pet owners, veterinarians, and kennel operators have asked for new compounds for tick control.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.10

Bulk-filling plums for interstate shipment
October 1959
Volume 13, Number 10

Research articles

Red sports of delicious apple: Reversion to striped fruit can be minimized by selecting red sports and using scion wood from nonreverted trees
by Dillon S. Brown, Claron O. Hesse, Edward C. Koch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The red sport of the Delicious apple most commonly planted in California is Starking. Richared Delicious has been planted on only a limited acreage since it colors later than Starking. The popularity of Starking has declined, however, because many trees or parts of trees have reverted toward the parent Delicious type and produce fruit less highly colored. Reverted fruit appears distinctly striped. Though lighter red, the stripes are prominent on reverted fruit because of the lack of the characteristic red background of the normal Starking. The reverted Starking is often called Stripes, or Common Delicious, as opposed to Double-red for well-colored fruit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The red sport of the Delicious apple most commonly planted in California is Starking. Richared Delicious has been planted on only a limited acreage since it colors later than Starking. The popularity of Starking has declined, however, because many trees or parts of trees have reverted toward the parent Delicious type and produce fruit less highly colored. Reverted fruit appears distinctly striped. Though lighter red, the stripes are prominent on reverted fruit because of the lack of the characteristic red background of the normal Starking. The reverted Starking is often called Stripes, or Common Delicious, as opposed to Double-red for well-colored fruit.
Optimum time for olive harvest: Fruit size and texture at harvest have important influence on the quality of black-ripe and green-ripe processed olives
by H. T. Hartmann, Marion Simone, R. H. Vaughn, E. C. Maxie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies conducted for three years, with several varieties of olives, were designed to determine the stage of fruit maturity at harvest that would result in the highest quality of black-ripe and green-ripe processed fruit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Studies conducted for three years, with several varieties of olives, were designed to determine the stage of fruit maturity at harvest that would result in the highest quality of black-ripe and green-ripe processed fruit.
Spiraled heads in lettuce: Malformation in Great Lakes lettuce strains apparently an inherited character producing united wrapper leaf margins
by F. W. Zink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Great Lakes lettuce, adapted to culture under a range of environmental conditions, normally produces a medium-large, globular, semi-exposed head. In some plantings, however, a percentage of the plant population develops conical-shaped heads, with the wrapper leaves or head leaves in a spiral-like fold. Market-stage plants of this type are generally referred to as spiraled heads. The shipper and retailer prefer a slightly oblate head with broad, flat butt, which can be packed evenly and firmly.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Great Lakes lettuce, adapted to culture under a range of environmental conditions, normally produces a medium-large, globular, semi-exposed head. In some plantings, however, a percentage of the plant population develops conical-shaped heads, with the wrapper leaves or head leaves in a spiral-like fold. Market-stage plants of this type are generally referred to as spiraled heads. The shipper and retailer prefer a slightly oblate head with broad, flat butt, which can be packed evenly and firmly.
Summer flooding of alfalfa: Disease induced by excessive flooding of fields during high temperatures is major factor in annual depletion of stands
by D. C. Erwin, W. F. Lehman, B. W. Kennedy, G. F. Worker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa stands in the Imperial and Palo Verde valleys of southern California often need to be replanted each year.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa stands in the Imperial and Palo Verde valleys of southern California often need to be replanted each year.
Alfalfa meal in swine rations: Tested as source of energy one pound of alfalfa had an average replacement value for 0.28 pound of concentrate
by Hubert Heitman, J. H. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The value of alfalfa meal as a source of energy for swine was determined for three levels of meal–5%, 20%, and 40% of the ration; three stages of plant maturity–16% bud, 3% bloom, and 34% bloom; and three methods of preparation–suncured, dehydrated, and pelleted dehydrated, reground.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The value of alfalfa meal as a source of energy for swine was determined for three levels of meal–5%, 20%, and 40% of the ration; three stages of plant maturity–16% bud, 3% bloom, and 34% bloom; and three methods of preparation–suncured, dehydrated, and pelleted dehydrated, reground.
Control of the brown dog tick: Two new insecticides control infestations of pest in kennels and on dogs without adverse effects on animals or humans
by I. Barry Tarshis, Michael R. Dunn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brown dog ticks have become resistant to a number of the standard insecticides. Pet owners, veterinarians, and kennel operators have asked for new compounds for tick control.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brown dog ticks have become resistant to a number of the standard insecticides. Pet owners, veterinarians, and kennel operators have asked for new compounds for tick control.

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