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California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.11

High altitude research on poultry
November 1959
Volume 13, Number 11

Research articles

Citrus irrigation water survey: Runoff water from diseased groves, carried in canals, can contaminate other land with infective Phytophthora spores
by L. J. Klotz, Po-Ping Wong, T. A. DeWolfe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Twelve irrigation canals, sampled repeatedly for one year, all harbored one or more of the species of Phytophthora that cause citrus diseases. The species that were prevalent varied with the seasonal temperature of the water. The fungus was found in only one of the three reservoirs tested.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Twelve irrigation canals, sampled repeatedly for one year, all harbored one or more of the species of Phytophthora that cause citrus diseases. The species that were prevalent varied with the seasonal temperature of the water. The fungus was found in only one of the three reservoirs tested.
Magnesium nitrate: Leaf analyses showed foliage sprays corrected deficiency in Valencia oranges
by T. W. Embleton, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage sprays of magnesium nitrate at 10 pounds per 100 gallons of water– applied in citrus plots when the spring flush of growth was about two thirds expanded–substantially increased the magnesium concentrations in the leaves. After trees were sprayed, further development of magnesium deficiency symptoms was checked. Within six months, leaves with symptoms at the time of spraying had dropped and sprayed trees were then practically free of symptoms. Leaves which had shown no deficiency became deeper green than similar leaves on nonsprayed trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage sprays of magnesium nitrate at 10 pounds per 100 gallons of water– applied in citrus plots when the spring flush of growth was about two thirds expanded–substantially increased the magnesium concentrations in the leaves. After trees were sprayed, further development of magnesium deficiency symptoms was checked. Within six months, leaves with symptoms at the time of spraying had dropped and sprayed trees were then practically free of symptoms. Leaves which had shown no deficiency became deeper green than similar leaves on nonsprayed trees.
Field windbreaks for row crops: Inter-row plantings of grain in white asparagus fields gave protection against wind erosion during tests on peat soil
by Herbert B. Schultz, Alan B. Carlton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inter-row planting as a practical management practice for the protection of while asparagus fields from wind erosion has been intensively studied since 1955. Such erosion is sometimes costly to the growers and is an important factor in peat dust storms.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inter-row planting as a practical management practice for the protection of while asparagus fields from wind erosion has been intensively studied since 1955. Such erosion is sometimes costly to the growers and is an important factor in peat dust storms.
Lygus on vegetable seed crops: Promising new insecticides and combinations revealed by tests on beet and carrot seed plants in Sacramento Valley
by Elmer C. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: New treatments for control of lygus bug–Lygus hesperus Knight–should be evaluated in terms of their effects on beneficial as well as harmful insects.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: New treatments for control of lygus bug–Lygus hesperus Knight–should be evaluated in terms of their effects on beneficial as well as harmful insects.
Poultry at high altitudes: Chicken colony at White Mountain Research Station is used for study of the adaptation of animals to climatic stress
by Arthur H. Smith, Hans Abplanalp, Lloyd M. Harwood, Clarence F. Kelly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Physiological adaptation–the ability to change so as to live more or less normally in a previously unfavorable or stressing environment–is one of the most universal properties of living things. However, the native ability of animals to adjust to variations in their environment has to a large extent been sacrificed in breeding animals for modern high standards of production.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Physiological adaptation–the ability to change so as to live more or less normally in a previously unfavorable or stressing environment–is one of the most universal properties of living things. However, the native ability of animals to adjust to variations in their environment has to a large extent been sacrificed in breeding animals for modern high standards of production.
Pelleted alfalfa: New form of feed supplement for beef heifers on protein-deficient dry range
by K. A. Wagnon, J. H. Meyer, F. D. Carroll
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa pellets hand-fed to weaner beef heifers at the rate of 1.5 pounds or more per head per day were as effective in promoting weight gains as were cottonseed meal pellets fed at the same rate. However, when the daily feeding rate was only 1.0 pound per head per day, the heifers gained more on cottonseed meal pellets than on alfalfa pellets.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa pellets hand-fed to weaner beef heifers at the rate of 1.5 pounds or more per head per day were as effective in promoting weight gains as were cottonseed meal pellets fed at the same rate. However, when the daily feeding rate was only 1.0 pound per head per day, the heifers gained more on cottonseed meal pellets than on alfalfa pellets.
Fowl tick on turkeys: Control by organic phosphates sprayed on wooden feed troughs just before use
by John L. Rodriguez, L. A. Riehl
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper timing and selection of insecticides determine the effectiveness of sprays against the fowl tick, Argas persicus (Oken).
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper timing and selection of insecticides determine the effectiveness of sprays against the fowl tick, Argas persicus (Oken).
Harvesting canning tomatoes: Reduction of labor requirement per ton pending development of economic mechanized tomato harvesting is subject of study
by John H. MacGillivray, Mike Zahara, L. J. Clemente
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Newest among the several types of equipment developed to study the harvest of canning tomatoes–where hand labor constitutes 88% of the cost–is a wheelbarrow harvester.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Newest among the several types of equipment developed to study the harvest of canning tomatoes–where hand labor constitutes 88% of the cost–is a wheelbarrow harvester.
Temperature effects on tomato: Hormone-set fruits of Early Pak variety develop different types of abnormalities at different controlled temperatures
by R. T. Wedding, H. M. Vines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Out-of-season tomato production varies unpredictably as to yield and fruit quality.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Out-of-season tomato production varies unpredictably as to yield and fruit quality.
New potato dryer: Wash water completely removed in 2–5 minutes without damage to potatoes
by J. R. Tavernetti, S. M. Henderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Losses from bacterial soft rot are most prevalent in winter, when atmospheric conditions are such that potatoes remain wet or damp after washing and packaging. Experiments have shown that the disease develops rapidly when relative humidity is 90% or higher and temperature is 60 °F or warmer, and that it can be prevented by drying potatoes after washing.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Losses from bacterial soft rot are most prevalent in winter, when atmospheric conditions are such that potatoes remain wet or damp after washing and packaging. Experiments have shown that the disease develops rapidly when relative humidity is 90% or higher and temperature is 60 °F or warmer, and that it can be prevented by drying potatoes after washing.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.11

High altitude research on poultry
November 1959
Volume 13, Number 11

Research articles

Citrus irrigation water survey: Runoff water from diseased groves, carried in canals, can contaminate other land with infective Phytophthora spores
by L. J. Klotz, Po-Ping Wong, T. A. DeWolfe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Twelve irrigation canals, sampled repeatedly for one year, all harbored one or more of the species of Phytophthora that cause citrus diseases. The species that were prevalent varied with the seasonal temperature of the water. The fungus was found in only one of the three reservoirs tested.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Twelve irrigation canals, sampled repeatedly for one year, all harbored one or more of the species of Phytophthora that cause citrus diseases. The species that were prevalent varied with the seasonal temperature of the water. The fungus was found in only one of the three reservoirs tested.
Magnesium nitrate: Leaf analyses showed foliage sprays corrected deficiency in Valencia oranges
by T. W. Embleton, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage sprays of magnesium nitrate at 10 pounds per 100 gallons of water– applied in citrus plots when the spring flush of growth was about two thirds expanded–substantially increased the magnesium concentrations in the leaves. After trees were sprayed, further development of magnesium deficiency symptoms was checked. Within six months, leaves with symptoms at the time of spraying had dropped and sprayed trees were then practically free of symptoms. Leaves which had shown no deficiency became deeper green than similar leaves on nonsprayed trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Foliage sprays of magnesium nitrate at 10 pounds per 100 gallons of water– applied in citrus plots when the spring flush of growth was about two thirds expanded–substantially increased the magnesium concentrations in the leaves. After trees were sprayed, further development of magnesium deficiency symptoms was checked. Within six months, leaves with symptoms at the time of spraying had dropped and sprayed trees were then practically free of symptoms. Leaves which had shown no deficiency became deeper green than similar leaves on nonsprayed trees.
Field windbreaks for row crops: Inter-row plantings of grain in white asparagus fields gave protection against wind erosion during tests on peat soil
by Herbert B. Schultz, Alan B. Carlton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inter-row planting as a practical management practice for the protection of while asparagus fields from wind erosion has been intensively studied since 1955. Such erosion is sometimes costly to the growers and is an important factor in peat dust storms.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Inter-row planting as a practical management practice for the protection of while asparagus fields from wind erosion has been intensively studied since 1955. Such erosion is sometimes costly to the growers and is an important factor in peat dust storms.
Lygus on vegetable seed crops: Promising new insecticides and combinations revealed by tests on beet and carrot seed plants in Sacramento Valley
by Elmer C. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: New treatments for control of lygus bug–Lygus hesperus Knight–should be evaluated in terms of their effects on beneficial as well as harmful insects.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: New treatments for control of lygus bug–Lygus hesperus Knight–should be evaluated in terms of their effects on beneficial as well as harmful insects.
Poultry at high altitudes: Chicken colony at White Mountain Research Station is used for study of the adaptation of animals to climatic stress
by Arthur H. Smith, Hans Abplanalp, Lloyd M. Harwood, Clarence F. Kelly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Physiological adaptation–the ability to change so as to live more or less normally in a previously unfavorable or stressing environment–is one of the most universal properties of living things. However, the native ability of animals to adjust to variations in their environment has to a large extent been sacrificed in breeding animals for modern high standards of production.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Physiological adaptation–the ability to change so as to live more or less normally in a previously unfavorable or stressing environment–is one of the most universal properties of living things. However, the native ability of animals to adjust to variations in their environment has to a large extent been sacrificed in breeding animals for modern high standards of production.
Pelleted alfalfa: New form of feed supplement for beef heifers on protein-deficient dry range
by K. A. Wagnon, J. H. Meyer, F. D. Carroll
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa pellets hand-fed to weaner beef heifers at the rate of 1.5 pounds or more per head per day were as effective in promoting weight gains as were cottonseed meal pellets fed at the same rate. However, when the daily feeding rate was only 1.0 pound per head per day, the heifers gained more on cottonseed meal pellets than on alfalfa pellets.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Alfalfa pellets hand-fed to weaner beef heifers at the rate of 1.5 pounds or more per head per day were as effective in promoting weight gains as were cottonseed meal pellets fed at the same rate. However, when the daily feeding rate was only 1.0 pound per head per day, the heifers gained more on cottonseed meal pellets than on alfalfa pellets.
Fowl tick on turkeys: Control by organic phosphates sprayed on wooden feed troughs just before use
by John L. Rodriguez, L. A. Riehl
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper timing and selection of insecticides determine the effectiveness of sprays against the fowl tick, Argas persicus (Oken).
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper timing and selection of insecticides determine the effectiveness of sprays against the fowl tick, Argas persicus (Oken).
Harvesting canning tomatoes: Reduction of labor requirement per ton pending development of economic mechanized tomato harvesting is subject of study
by John H. MacGillivray, Mike Zahara, L. J. Clemente
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Newest among the several types of equipment developed to study the harvest of canning tomatoes–where hand labor constitutes 88% of the cost–is a wheelbarrow harvester.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Newest among the several types of equipment developed to study the harvest of canning tomatoes–where hand labor constitutes 88% of the cost–is a wheelbarrow harvester.
Temperature effects on tomato: Hormone-set fruits of Early Pak variety develop different types of abnormalities at different controlled temperatures
by R. T. Wedding, H. M. Vines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Out-of-season tomato production varies unpredictably as to yield and fruit quality.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Out-of-season tomato production varies unpredictably as to yield and fruit quality.
New potato dryer: Wash water completely removed in 2–5 minutes without damage to potatoes
by J. R. Tavernetti, S. M. Henderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Losses from bacterial soft rot are most prevalent in winter, when atmospheric conditions are such that potatoes remain wet or damp after washing and packaging. Experiments have shown that the disease develops rapidly when relative humidity is 90% or higher and temperature is 60 °F or warmer, and that it can be prevented by drying potatoes after washing.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Losses from bacterial soft rot are most prevalent in winter, when atmospheric conditions are such that potatoes remain wet or damp after washing and packaging. Experiments have shown that the disease develops rapidly when relative humidity is 90% or higher and temperature is 60 °F or warmer, and that it can be prevented by drying potatoes after washing.

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