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Poultry at high altitudes: Chicken colony at White Mountain Research Station is used for study of the adaptation of animals to climatic stress

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Authors

Arthur H. Smith , University of California, Davis.
Hans Abplanalp, University of California, Davis.
Lloyd M. Harwood, University of California, Santa Rosa.
Clarence F. Kelly, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(11):8-9.

Published November 01, 1959

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Abstract

Physiological adaptation–the ability to change so as to live more or less normally in a previously unfavorable or stressing environment–is one of the most universal properties of living things. However, the native ability of animals to adjust to variations in their environment has to a large extent been sacrificed in breeding animals for modern high standards of production.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1817. This work is also supported by a research grant, No. H-1920, from the National Heart Institute, U. S. Public Health Service.

The White Mountain High-Altitude Research Station in Mono County has laboratories at elevations of 10,000', 12,500', and 14,250'. Nello Pace, Professor of Physiology, University of California, Berkeley, is Operations Director.

Poultry at high altitudes: Chicken colony at White Mountain Research Station is used for study of the adaptation of animals to climatic stress

Arthur H. Smith, Hans Abplanalp, Lloyd M. Harwood, Clarence F. Kelly
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Poultry at high altitudes: Chicken colony at White Mountain Research Station is used for study of the adaptation of animals to climatic stress

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Arthur H. Smith , University of California, Davis.
Hans Abplanalp, University of California, Davis.
Lloyd M. Harwood, University of California, Santa Rosa.
Clarence F. Kelly, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(11):8-9.

Published November 01, 1959

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Physiological adaptation–the ability to change so as to live more or less normally in a previously unfavorable or stressing environment–is one of the most universal properties of living things. However, the native ability of animals to adjust to variations in their environment has to a large extent been sacrificed in breeding animals for modern high standards of production.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1817. This work is also supported by a research grant, No. H-1920, from the National Heart Institute, U. S. Public Health Service.

The White Mountain High-Altitude Research Station in Mono County has laboratories at elevations of 10,000', 12,500', and 14,250'. Nello Pace, Professor of Physiology, University of California, Berkeley, is Operations Director.


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