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California Agriculture, Vol. 12, No.5

Increased yields with grain sorghum hybrids
May 1958
Volume 12, Number 5

Research articles

Hybrid grain sorghum trials: Yields of 23 hybrids tested in growing areas of state under varying conditions showed increases over old line varieties
by Dale G. Smeltzer, M. D. Miller, Vern L. Marble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: To evaluate the relative merits of hybrid varieties of grain sorghum 23 hybrids were grown in comparison with established varieties in trials conducted in grain sorghum growing areas of the state. Most of the trials involved non-replicated strip plantings in commercial fields. The cultural practices—including harvest—were typical of those used by growers in the particular areas where the tests were made.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: To evaluate the relative merits of hybrid varieties of grain sorghum 23 hybrids were grown in comparison with established varieties in trials conducted in grain sorghum growing areas of the state. Most of the trials involved non-replicated strip plantings in commercial fields. The cultural practices—including harvest—were typical of those used by growers in the particular areas where the tests were made.
Feeding value of oat hay: Stage of plant maturity at harvest affected total digestible nutrients in Kanota oat hay in evaluation trials with sheep
by J. H. Meyer, W. C. Weir, L. G. Jones, J. L. Hull
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Oats harvested at the 18% flower stage produced the greatest nutrient yield in studies—feeding trials, digestion trials and chemical analyses of the forage—to evaluate the feeding value of oat hay.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Oats harvested at the 18% flower stage produced the greatest nutrient yield in studies—feeding trials, digestion trials and chemical analyses of the forage—to evaluate the feeding value of oat hay.
Gibberellic acid on mandarin: Possibility of increasing fruit set of Clementine mandarin without adversely affecting fruit or trees now under study
by Robert K. Soost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Poor fruit set is a problem in the Clementine—Algerian—mandarin wherever it is grown.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Poor fruit set is a problem in the Clementine—Algerian—mandarin wherever it is grown.
Fruitfulness in the olive: Winter chilling may explain higher yields of orchards in the interior Central Valley than of those in southern California
by H. T. Hartmann, I. Porlingis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Olive trees will not survive winter temperatures below 10°F-12°F, but they require relatively cold winters to produce satisfactory commercial crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Olive trees will not survive winter temperatures below 10°F-12°F, but they require relatively cold winters to produce satisfactory commercial crops.
Root-lesion nematode on walnut: Replants of California black walnut and unselected Paradox hybrid responded to preplanting soil fumigation in trials
by B. F. Lownsbery, S. A. Sher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Infestations of root-lesion nematodes—Pratylenchus vulnus—occur in all important walnut growing areas in California and high population densities cause a disease of economic importance. The disease is characterized by stunting, die-back, and chlorosis in the tops of the trees; by yield reduction; and by root symptoms consisting of black lesions, longitudinal cracking, and even death of entire roots. The disease has been induced experimentally by adding a suspension of the root-lesion nematodes to California black walnut seedlings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Infestations of root-lesion nematodes—Pratylenchus vulnus—occur in all important walnut growing areas in California and high population densities cause a disease of economic importance. The disease is characterized by stunting, die-back, and chlorosis in the tops of the trees; by yield reduction; and by root symptoms consisting of black lesions, longitudinal cracking, and even death of entire roots. The disease has been induced experimentally by adding a suspension of the root-lesion nematodes to California black walnut seedlings.
Control of sugar-beet nematode: Field tests with soil fumigants indicate crop rotation using non-host plants is most effective control of sugar beet pest
by D. J. Raski, B. Lear
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of the sugar-beet nematode—Heterodera schachtii—would eliminate disadvantages of control by crop rotation which normally requires at least 3—4 years of non-host crops. In some areas the only alternate crops which can be grown are not so profitable as sugar beets or are themselves hosts of the nematode.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of the sugar-beet nematode—Heterodera schachtii—would eliminate disadvantages of control by crop rotation which normally requires at least 3—4 years of non-host crops. In some areas the only alternate crops which can be grown are not so profitable as sugar beets or are themselves hosts of the nematode.
Gibberellin tested on citrus: Fruit set on Bearss lime, Eureka lemon, and Washington navel orange increased by treatments in preliminary investigations
by H. Z. Hield, C. W. Coggins, M. J. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Light fruit set of navel oranges and—to a lesser degree—of Valencia oranges often occurs and growth regulators tested in California in the past have failed to increase the set. However, certain gibberellin treatments—in preliminary experiments—have increased fruit set on lime, lemon, and orange trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Light fruit set of navel oranges and—to a lesser degree—of Valencia oranges often occurs and growth regulators tested in California in the past have failed to increase the set. However, certain gibberellin treatments—in preliminary experiments—have increased fruit set on lime, lemon, and orange trees.
Fresh fruits and vegetables: Deliveries per week and refrigeration available for fresh fruits and vegetables affected by types of retail stores
by Jessie V. Coles, Marilyn Dunsing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the fifth of a series of reports on a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The following article is the fifth of a series of reports on a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 12, No.5

Increased yields with grain sorghum hybrids
May 1958
Volume 12, Number 5

Research articles

Hybrid grain sorghum trials: Yields of 23 hybrids tested in growing areas of state under varying conditions showed increases over old line varieties
by Dale G. Smeltzer, M. D. Miller, Vern L. Marble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: To evaluate the relative merits of hybrid varieties of grain sorghum 23 hybrids were grown in comparison with established varieties in trials conducted in grain sorghum growing areas of the state. Most of the trials involved non-replicated strip plantings in commercial fields. The cultural practices—including harvest—were typical of those used by growers in the particular areas where the tests were made.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: To evaluate the relative merits of hybrid varieties of grain sorghum 23 hybrids were grown in comparison with established varieties in trials conducted in grain sorghum growing areas of the state. Most of the trials involved non-replicated strip plantings in commercial fields. The cultural practices—including harvest—were typical of those used by growers in the particular areas where the tests were made.
Feeding value of oat hay: Stage of plant maturity at harvest affected total digestible nutrients in Kanota oat hay in evaluation trials with sheep
by J. H. Meyer, W. C. Weir, L. G. Jones, J. L. Hull
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Oats harvested at the 18% flower stage produced the greatest nutrient yield in studies—feeding trials, digestion trials and chemical analyses of the forage—to evaluate the feeding value of oat hay.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Oats harvested at the 18% flower stage produced the greatest nutrient yield in studies—feeding trials, digestion trials and chemical analyses of the forage—to evaluate the feeding value of oat hay.
Gibberellic acid on mandarin: Possibility of increasing fruit set of Clementine mandarin without adversely affecting fruit or trees now under study
by Robert K. Soost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Poor fruit set is a problem in the Clementine—Algerian—mandarin wherever it is grown.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Poor fruit set is a problem in the Clementine—Algerian—mandarin wherever it is grown.
Fruitfulness in the olive: Winter chilling may explain higher yields of orchards in the interior Central Valley than of those in southern California
by H. T. Hartmann, I. Porlingis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Olive trees will not survive winter temperatures below 10°F-12°F, but they require relatively cold winters to produce satisfactory commercial crops.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Olive trees will not survive winter temperatures below 10°F-12°F, but they require relatively cold winters to produce satisfactory commercial crops.
Root-lesion nematode on walnut: Replants of California black walnut and unselected Paradox hybrid responded to preplanting soil fumigation in trials
by B. F. Lownsbery, S. A. Sher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Infestations of root-lesion nematodes—Pratylenchus vulnus—occur in all important walnut growing areas in California and high population densities cause a disease of economic importance. The disease is characterized by stunting, die-back, and chlorosis in the tops of the trees; by yield reduction; and by root symptoms consisting of black lesions, longitudinal cracking, and even death of entire roots. The disease has been induced experimentally by adding a suspension of the root-lesion nematodes to California black walnut seedlings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Infestations of root-lesion nematodes—Pratylenchus vulnus—occur in all important walnut growing areas in California and high population densities cause a disease of economic importance. The disease is characterized by stunting, die-back, and chlorosis in the tops of the trees; by yield reduction; and by root symptoms consisting of black lesions, longitudinal cracking, and even death of entire roots. The disease has been induced experimentally by adding a suspension of the root-lesion nematodes to California black walnut seedlings.
Control of sugar-beet nematode: Field tests with soil fumigants indicate crop rotation using non-host plants is most effective control of sugar beet pest
by D. J. Raski, B. Lear
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of the sugar-beet nematode—Heterodera schachtii—would eliminate disadvantages of control by crop rotation which normally requires at least 3—4 years of non-host crops. In some areas the only alternate crops which can be grown are not so profitable as sugar beets or are themselves hosts of the nematode.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Chemical control of the sugar-beet nematode—Heterodera schachtii—would eliminate disadvantages of control by crop rotation which normally requires at least 3—4 years of non-host crops. In some areas the only alternate crops which can be grown are not so profitable as sugar beets or are themselves hosts of the nematode.
Gibberellin tested on citrus: Fruit set on Bearss lime, Eureka lemon, and Washington navel orange increased by treatments in preliminary investigations
by H. Z. Hield, C. W. Coggins, M. J. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Light fruit set of navel oranges and—to a lesser degree—of Valencia oranges often occurs and growth regulators tested in California in the past have failed to increase the set. However, certain gibberellin treatments—in preliminary experiments—have increased fruit set on lime, lemon, and orange trees.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Light fruit set of navel oranges and—to a lesser degree—of Valencia oranges often occurs and growth regulators tested in California in the past have failed to increase the set. However, certain gibberellin treatments—in preliminary experiments—have increased fruit set on lime, lemon, and orange trees.
Fresh fruits and vegetables: Deliveries per week and refrigeration available for fresh fruits and vegetables affected by types of retail stores
by Jessie V. Coles, Marilyn Dunsing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the fifth of a series of reports on a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The following article is the fifth of a series of reports on a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.

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