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California Agriculture, Vol. 12, No.4

Preplanting dip for bulbs improved quality
April 1958
Volume 12, Number 4

Research articles

Root rot of Easter lilies: Preplanting fungicidal dip for lily bulbs reduces incidence of disease and improves bloom quality and quantity of plants
by J. G. Bald, Philip A. Chandler, John V. Lenz, R. H. Sciaroni, A. O. Paulus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Clean, white Croft lily bulbs—once a dull yellow—that are now coming from the soil give evidence of a great change in growth, productivity, and quality of Easter lilies, that influences the practices of field growers, brokers and forcers and produces better flowering plants.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Clean, white Croft lily bulbs—once a dull yellow—that are now coming from the soil give evidence of a great change in growth, productivity, and quality of Easter lilies, that influences the practices of field growers, brokers and forcers and produces better flowering plants.
Wild safflower in California: Improvement of cultivated safflower through plant-breeding program to obtain desirable characteristics of wild species
by P. F. Knowles, Amram Ashri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultivated safflower — Carthamus tinctorius L.—was established in California as a commercial crop in 1950 and by 1956, approximately 84,000 acres were in production. Most of the acreage was in the Sacramento Valley but it is likely that the total acreage will increase because there is a good market for safflower oil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultivated safflower — Carthamus tinctorius L.—was established in California as a commercial crop in 1950 and by 1956, approximately 84,000 acres were in production. Most of the acreage was in the Sacramento Valley but it is likely that the total acreage will increase because there is a good market for safflower oil.
Potato sprout inhibitor spray: Aircraft spraying of growth regulator maleic hydrazide is not effective means of reducing sprouting of stored potatoes
by Herman Timm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maleic hydroxide — MH-40—effectively reduces storage losses of potatoes and onions but little use has been made of it as a growth regulator in potato growing in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maleic hydroxide — MH-40—effectively reduces storage losses of potatoes and onions but little use has been made of it as a growth regulator in potato growing in California.
Spray thinning Newtown apples: Properly timed and applied, spray treatment satisfactorily thinned fruit for size and yield in trials near Watsonville
by K. Uriu, O. Lilleland, E. C. Koch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercial size spray thinning trials with naphthylacetamide—Amid Thin—in 1956 and 1957 indicated that the material can satisfactorily thin Newtown apples, does not injure foliage, reduces hand thinning costs and can result in a better return bloom the following year.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercial size spray thinning trials with naphthylacetamide—Amid Thin—in 1956 and 1957 indicated that the material can satisfactorily thin Newtown apples, does not injure foliage, reduces hand thinning costs and can result in a better return bloom the following year.
Pelleted alfalfa hay: Baled and pelleted alfalfa hay in comparative trial with beef steers
by N. R. Ittner, J. H. Meyer, G. P. Lofgreen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pelleting alfalfa hay for livestock reduces the bulk and transforms the hay into a free flowing form like grain and cuts labor requirements for handling.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pelleting alfalfa hay for livestock reduces the bulk and transforms the hay into a free flowing form like grain and cuts labor requirements for handling.
Chamise control with aircraft: Herbicides applied by aircraft in spring following fall burn controlled chamise sprouts and brush seedlings in range test
by O. A. Leonard, C. E. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of aircraft to apply herbicides in the control of chamise and associated brush species—as a follow-up to controlled burning and seeding—was studied on a chamise dominated area. The test site was at a 1,400′ elevation in the foothills of the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, about 10 miles west of Placerville.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of aircraft to apply herbicides in the control of chamise and associated brush species—as a follow-up to controlled burning and seeding—was studied on a chamise dominated area. The test site was at a 1,400′ elevation in the foothills of the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, about 10 miles west of Placerville.
Filbertworm control trials: Two new insecticides tested on Payne, Franquette and Hartley walnuts in two experimental orchards in northern California
by Arthur H. Retan, George R. Post, Clarence S. Davis, A. E. Michelbacher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The intensity of the filbertworm infestation of walnuts in northern California in 1957 was less than in the peak year of 1954, but it marked the fourth straight year that the filbertworm has presented a problem. Based on past history the 1957 attack was surprising because observations have indicated that the pest would not continue at a highly destructive level over a period of several years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The intensity of the filbertworm infestation of walnuts in northern California in 1957 was less than in the peak year of 1954, but it marked the fourth straight year that the filbertworm has presented a problem. Based on past history the 1957 attack was surprising because observations have indicated that the pest would not continue at a highly destructive level over a period of several years.
Turf invasion by weedy grasses: Weed-free plots of Merion bluegrass turf used in study of factors favoring invasion by crabgrass and common bermuda
by John H. Madison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation practices and mowing heights were found to affect invasion of turf by weedy grasses in a two-year study conducted at Davis involving 36 test plots and nine combinations of treatment, replicated four times.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation practices and mowing heights were found to affect invasion of turf by weedy grasses in a two-year study conducted at Davis involving 36 test plots and nine combinations of treatment, replicated four times.
Cutworms on white asparagus: Satisfactory control achieved with an endrin oil-base bait but chemical not yet registered for use on green asparagus
by W. Harry Lange, Stanley F. Bailey, John P. Underbill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dark-sided cutworm — Euxoa messoria (Harris)—causes yearly economic damage to asparagus grown in the delta area.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dark-sided cutworm — Euxoa messoria (Harris)—causes yearly economic damage to asparagus grown in the delta area.
Fruits, vegetables at retail: Availability of fresh and frozen fruits, vegetables varies with store size, location, and ownership as shown by survey
by Jessie V. Coles, Marilyn Dunsing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the fourth of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The following article is the fourth of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 12, No.4

Preplanting dip for bulbs improved quality
April 1958
Volume 12, Number 4

Research articles

Root rot of Easter lilies: Preplanting fungicidal dip for lily bulbs reduces incidence of disease and improves bloom quality and quantity of plants
by J. G. Bald, Philip A. Chandler, John V. Lenz, R. H. Sciaroni, A. O. Paulus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Clean, white Croft lily bulbs—once a dull yellow—that are now coming from the soil give evidence of a great change in growth, productivity, and quality of Easter lilies, that influences the practices of field growers, brokers and forcers and produces better flowering plants.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Clean, white Croft lily bulbs—once a dull yellow—that are now coming from the soil give evidence of a great change in growth, productivity, and quality of Easter lilies, that influences the practices of field growers, brokers and forcers and produces better flowering plants.
Wild safflower in California: Improvement of cultivated safflower through plant-breeding program to obtain desirable characteristics of wild species
by P. F. Knowles, Amram Ashri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultivated safflower — Carthamus tinctorius L.—was established in California as a commercial crop in 1950 and by 1956, approximately 84,000 acres were in production. Most of the acreage was in the Sacramento Valley but it is likely that the total acreage will increase because there is a good market for safflower oil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultivated safflower — Carthamus tinctorius L.—was established in California as a commercial crop in 1950 and by 1956, approximately 84,000 acres were in production. Most of the acreage was in the Sacramento Valley but it is likely that the total acreage will increase because there is a good market for safflower oil.
Potato sprout inhibitor spray: Aircraft spraying of growth regulator maleic hydrazide is not effective means of reducing sprouting of stored potatoes
by Herman Timm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maleic hydroxide — MH-40—effectively reduces storage losses of potatoes and onions but little use has been made of it as a growth regulator in potato growing in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maleic hydroxide — MH-40—effectively reduces storage losses of potatoes and onions but little use has been made of it as a growth regulator in potato growing in California.
Spray thinning Newtown apples: Properly timed and applied, spray treatment satisfactorily thinned fruit for size and yield in trials near Watsonville
by K. Uriu, O. Lilleland, E. C. Koch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercial size spray thinning trials with naphthylacetamide—Amid Thin—in 1956 and 1957 indicated that the material can satisfactorily thin Newtown apples, does not injure foliage, reduces hand thinning costs and can result in a better return bloom the following year.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercial size spray thinning trials with naphthylacetamide—Amid Thin—in 1956 and 1957 indicated that the material can satisfactorily thin Newtown apples, does not injure foliage, reduces hand thinning costs and can result in a better return bloom the following year.
Pelleted alfalfa hay: Baled and pelleted alfalfa hay in comparative trial with beef steers
by N. R. Ittner, J. H. Meyer, G. P. Lofgreen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pelleting alfalfa hay for livestock reduces the bulk and transforms the hay into a free flowing form like grain and cuts labor requirements for handling.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pelleting alfalfa hay for livestock reduces the bulk and transforms the hay into a free flowing form like grain and cuts labor requirements for handling.
Chamise control with aircraft: Herbicides applied by aircraft in spring following fall burn controlled chamise sprouts and brush seedlings in range test
by O. A. Leonard, C. E. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of aircraft to apply herbicides in the control of chamise and associated brush species—as a follow-up to controlled burning and seeding—was studied on a chamise dominated area. The test site was at a 1,400′ elevation in the foothills of the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, about 10 miles west of Placerville.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The use of aircraft to apply herbicides in the control of chamise and associated brush species—as a follow-up to controlled burning and seeding—was studied on a chamise dominated area. The test site was at a 1,400′ elevation in the foothills of the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, about 10 miles west of Placerville.
Filbertworm control trials: Two new insecticides tested on Payne, Franquette and Hartley walnuts in two experimental orchards in northern California
by Arthur H. Retan, George R. Post, Clarence S. Davis, A. E. Michelbacher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The intensity of the filbertworm infestation of walnuts in northern California in 1957 was less than in the peak year of 1954, but it marked the fourth straight year that the filbertworm has presented a problem. Based on past history the 1957 attack was surprising because observations have indicated that the pest would not continue at a highly destructive level over a period of several years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The intensity of the filbertworm infestation of walnuts in northern California in 1957 was less than in the peak year of 1954, but it marked the fourth straight year that the filbertworm has presented a problem. Based on past history the 1957 attack was surprising because observations have indicated that the pest would not continue at a highly destructive level over a period of several years.
Turf invasion by weedy grasses: Weed-free plots of Merion bluegrass turf used in study of factors favoring invasion by crabgrass and common bermuda
by John H. Madison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation practices and mowing heights were found to affect invasion of turf by weedy grasses in a two-year study conducted at Davis involving 36 test plots and nine combinations of treatment, replicated four times.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation practices and mowing heights were found to affect invasion of turf by weedy grasses in a two-year study conducted at Davis involving 36 test plots and nine combinations of treatment, replicated four times.
Cutworms on white asparagus: Satisfactory control achieved with an endrin oil-base bait but chemical not yet registered for use on green asparagus
by W. Harry Lange, Stanley F. Bailey, John P. Underbill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dark-sided cutworm — Euxoa messoria (Harris)—causes yearly economic damage to asparagus grown in the delta area.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The dark-sided cutworm — Euxoa messoria (Harris)—causes yearly economic damage to asparagus grown in the delta area.
Fruits, vegetables at retail: Availability of fresh and frozen fruits, vegetables varies with store size, location, and ownership as shown by survey
by Jessie V. Coles, Marilyn Dunsing
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the fourth of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.
The following article is the fourth of a series of reports of a survey of characteristics of and services offered by retail grocery stores in five counties in California made cooperatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, and the United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act as part of Western Regional Research Project WM-26.

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