California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Wild safflower in California: Improvement of cultivated safflower through plant-breeding program to obtain desirable characteristics of wild species

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

P. F. Knowles, University of California
Amram Ashri, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(4):4-5.

Published April 01, 1958

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Cultivated safflower — Carthamus tinctorius L.—was established in California as a commercial crop in 1950 and by 1956, approximately 84,000 acres were in production. Most of the acreage was in the Sacramento Valley but it is likely that the total acreage will increase because there is a good market for safflower oil.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1041.

Wild safflower in California: Improvement of cultivated safflower through plant-breeding program to obtain desirable characteristics of wild species

P. F. Knowles, Amram Ashri
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Wild safflower in California: Improvement of cultivated safflower through plant-breeding program to obtain desirable characteristics of wild species

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

P. F. Knowles, University of California
Amram Ashri, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 12(4):4-5.

Published April 01, 1958

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Cultivated safflower — Carthamus tinctorius L.—was established in California as a commercial crop in 1950 and by 1956, approximately 84,000 acres were in production. Most of the acreage was in the Sacramento Valley but it is likely that the total acreage will increase because there is a good market for safflower oil.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1041.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu