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California Agriculture, Vol. 7, No.1

Berry size of seedless grapes affected by sprays
January 1953
Volume 7, Number 1

Research articles

Fryer grading: System of uniform USDA standards tested in 10s Angeles retail markets
by Kenneth D. Naden, George A. Jackson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, as part of Western Regional Marketing Project WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946.
This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, as part of Western Regional Marketing Project WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946.
Insect damage to apricots: DDD as petal fall spray and parathion as properly timed May spray control fruit-feeding insects
by Harold F. Madsen, Arthur D. Borden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A yearly spray program is a necessity if the average apricot grower is to produce clean fruit—especially in the Santa Clara Valley where the codling moth and orange tortrix have become of primary importance.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A yearly spray program is a necessity if the average apricot grower is to produce clean fruit—especially in the Santa Clara Valley where the codling moth and orange tortrix have become of primary importance.
Early sprays for brown mites: New miticides tested for effectiveness when included in usual near-bloom sprays on almonds and peaches
by F. M. Summers, D. M. Holmberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Recent investigations tested the possibility of incorporating various new miticides for the control of the brown mite— Bryobia praetiosa K.—in the usual sprays applied to almonds and peaches in the pink-bud period.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Recent investigations tested the possibility of incorporating various new miticides for the control of the brown mite— Bryobia praetiosa K.—in the usual sprays applied to almonds and peaches in the pink-bud period.
Berry size of seedless grapes: Growth regulator alone or in combination with girdling increases berry size of seedless varieties
by Robert J. Weaver
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Berry size of Thompson Seedless and other seedless grape varieties was increased by spray application of a growth regulator.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Berry size of Thompson Seedless and other seedless grape varieties was increased by spray application of a growth regulator.
Nuclear lines of citrus: Tree size, yield, and fruit characters of old and young lines of ten citrus varieties compared
by James W. Cameron, Robert K. Soost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nucellar-seedling lines of citrus showed substantially greater tree size and yields in nearly every case, when compared with old-line trees in a study at Riverside.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nucellar-seedling lines of citrus showed substantially greater tree size and yields in nearly every case, when compared with old-line trees in a study at Riverside.
Stem pitting on citrus trees: Disorder resulting from quick decline observed in California citrus orchards for the first time in 1952
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stem pitting—a symptom of quick decline—was first observed in California citrus orchards in 1952.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stem pitting—a symptom of quick decline—was first observed in California citrus orchards in 1952.
Efficiency in fruit marketing: Costs of Ridding packed fruit boxes influenced by type of equipment, size of plant, length of season
by B. C. French
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part VII of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part VII of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act.
How families buy dairy products: Retail sources supplied dairy products to a larger proportion of families studied than did delivery service
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The fourth of a series of reports of a survey on the consumption of dairy products in urban areas of California made co-operatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, California State Department of Agriculture, and United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act
The fourth of a series of reports of a survey on the consumption of dairy products in urban areas of California made co-operatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, California State Department of Agriculture, and United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act
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California Agriculture, Vol. 7, No.1

Berry size of seedless grapes affected by sprays
January 1953
Volume 7, Number 1

Research articles

Fryer grading: System of uniform USDA standards tested in 10s Angeles retail markets
by Kenneth D. Naden, George A. Jackson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, as part of Western Regional Marketing Project WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946.
This research work was conducted in co-operation with the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Production and Marketing Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, as part of Western Regional Marketing Project WM-7. It was financed partly by funds appropriated under the Research and Marketing Act of 1946.
Insect damage to apricots: DDD as petal fall spray and parathion as properly timed May spray control fruit-feeding insects
by Harold F. Madsen, Arthur D. Borden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A yearly spray program is a necessity if the average apricot grower is to produce clean fruit—especially in the Santa Clara Valley where the codling moth and orange tortrix have become of primary importance.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A yearly spray program is a necessity if the average apricot grower is to produce clean fruit—especially in the Santa Clara Valley where the codling moth and orange tortrix have become of primary importance.
Early sprays for brown mites: New miticides tested for effectiveness when included in usual near-bloom sprays on almonds and peaches
by F. M. Summers, D. M. Holmberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Recent investigations tested the possibility of incorporating various new miticides for the control of the brown mite— Bryobia praetiosa K.—in the usual sprays applied to almonds and peaches in the pink-bud period.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Recent investigations tested the possibility of incorporating various new miticides for the control of the brown mite— Bryobia praetiosa K.—in the usual sprays applied to almonds and peaches in the pink-bud period.
Berry size of seedless grapes: Growth regulator alone or in combination with girdling increases berry size of seedless varieties
by Robert J. Weaver
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Berry size of Thompson Seedless and other seedless grape varieties was increased by spray application of a growth regulator.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Berry size of Thompson Seedless and other seedless grape varieties was increased by spray application of a growth regulator.
Nuclear lines of citrus: Tree size, yield, and fruit characters of old and young lines of ten citrus varieties compared
by James W. Cameron, Robert K. Soost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nucellar-seedling lines of citrus showed substantially greater tree size and yields in nearly every case, when compared with old-line trees in a study at Riverside.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Nucellar-seedling lines of citrus showed substantially greater tree size and yields in nearly every case, when compared with old-line trees in a study at Riverside.
Stem pitting on citrus trees: Disorder resulting from quick decline observed in California citrus orchards for the first time in 1952
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stem pitting—a symptom of quick decline—was first observed in California citrus orchards in 1952.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stem pitting—a symptom of quick decline—was first observed in California citrus orchards in 1952.
Efficiency in fruit marketing: Costs of Ridding packed fruit boxes influenced by type of equipment, size of plant, length of season
by B. C. French
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part VII of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part VII of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packing-house equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act.
How families buy dairy products: Retail sources supplied dairy products to a larger proportion of families studied than did delivery service
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The fourth of a series of reports of a survey on the consumption of dairy products in urban areas of California made co-operatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, California State Department of Agriculture, and United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act
The fourth of a series of reports of a survey on the consumption of dairy products in urban areas of California made co-operatively by the Department of Home Economics, University of California, California State Department of Agriculture, and United States Department of Agriculture under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act

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