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California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.9

Quick-decline tolerant citrus rootstocks
September 1952
Volume 6, Number 9

Research articles

High quality citrus rootstock: Cleopatra Mandarin, Troyer Citrange rootstocks produce quick-decline tolerant trees bearing high-quality fruit
by L. D. Batchelor, W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer cit-range are promising rootstocks for orange trees. They are resistant to damage from quick decline and they produce high quality fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer cit-range are promising rootstocks for orange trees. They are resistant to damage from quick decline and they produce high quality fruit.
Variety trials: Sugar beets compared for growth, sugar content in controlled chambers
by Albert Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The growing of sugar beet plants in controlled climates is used to aid the selection of better varieties for commercial beet sugar production.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The growing of sugar beet plants in controlled climates is used to aid the selection of better varieties for commercial beet sugar production.
Synthetic soil conditioners: New synthetic organic materials under study for their effectiveness when added to certain California soils
by Geoffrey B. Bodman, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following article is a condensation of a more detailed report on the subject of synthetic soil conditioners which is available without cost by addressing the Office of Agricultural Publications, 22 Gannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
The following article is a condensation of a more detailed report on the subject of synthetic soil conditioners which is available without cost by addressing the Office of Agricultural Publications, 22 Gannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Soil compaction by tractors: Irrigated soils may suffer from low water penetration limiting root development and reducing plant growth
by L. D. Doneen, D. W. Henderson, G. V. Ferry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The soil compaction problem can not be solved quickly by short-term means; it requires preventive long-range soil management.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The soil compaction problem can not be solved quickly by short-term means; it requires preventive long-range soil management.
Efficiency in fruit marketing: Packing labor efficiency and costs in California pear and apple packing plants influenced by varying factors
by B. C. French
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part IV of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packinghouse equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act. Detailed reports are available by addressing the Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4.
Part IV of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packinghouse equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act. Detailed reports are available by addressing the Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4.
Small-seed legume harvesting: Clover and alfalfa seed threshing losses minimized by minor modifications and adjustments of present machines
by P. R. Bunnelle, L. G. Jones, R. A. Kepner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 115 field test runs made during the 1951 harvest season indicate that present harvesting machines, with minor modifications and careful adjustment, can do a satisfactory job of threshing seed of alfalfa and some kinds of clover—provided the load is kept at a reasonable level.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 115 field test runs made during the 1951 harvest season indicate that present harvesting machines, with minor modifications and careful adjustment, can do a satisfactory job of threshing seed of alfalfa and some kinds of clover—provided the load is kept at a reasonable level.
Fryer marketing: Economies of continuous and batch systems compared in Hayward area
by John Abbott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Producers of chicken fryers in the Hayward area of Alameda County have a wide range of outlets through which their fryers can reach consumers.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Producers of chicken fryers in the Hayward area of Alameda County have a wide range of outlets through which their fryers can reach consumers.
Mites on citrus: Two chemicals show exceptional control possibilities in tests
by G. E. Carman, L. R. Jeppson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two of the newer chemicals show outstanding possibilities for the commercial grower's use to control mites injurious to citrus in California. The materials are specific acaricides—mite-killers—and therefore they are relatively nontoxic to beneficial insects, so treatments result in a minimal effect on insect parasites and predators as well as bees. Nor does their application effectively reduce populations of injurious insects.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two of the newer chemicals show outstanding possibilities for the commercial grower's use to control mites injurious to citrus in California. The materials are specific acaricides—mite-killers—and therefore they are relatively nontoxic to beneficial insects, so treatments result in a minimal effect on insect parasites and predators as well as bees. Nor does their application effectively reduce populations of injurious insects.
Dieldrin for thrips: Control of citrus thrips is possible but further studies are needed
by W. H. Ewart, H. S. Elmer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dieldrin has shown outstanding promise in the control of citrus thrips on oranges, grapefruit, and lemons during three years of experiments.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dieldrin has shown outstanding promise in the control of citrus thrips on oranges, grapefruit, and lemons during three years of experiments.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.9

Quick-decline tolerant citrus rootstocks
September 1952
Volume 6, Number 9

Research articles

High quality citrus rootstock: Cleopatra Mandarin, Troyer Citrange rootstocks produce quick-decline tolerant trees bearing high-quality fruit
by L. D. Batchelor, W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer cit-range are promising rootstocks for orange trees. They are resistant to damage from quick decline and they produce high quality fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer cit-range are promising rootstocks for orange trees. They are resistant to damage from quick decline and they produce high quality fruit.
Variety trials: Sugar beets compared for growth, sugar content in controlled chambers
by Albert Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The growing of sugar beet plants in controlled climates is used to aid the selection of better varieties for commercial beet sugar production.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The growing of sugar beet plants in controlled climates is used to aid the selection of better varieties for commercial beet sugar production.
Synthetic soil conditioners: New synthetic organic materials under study for their effectiveness when added to certain California soils
by Geoffrey B. Bodman, Robert M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The following article is a condensation of a more detailed report on the subject of synthetic soil conditioners which is available without cost by addressing the Office of Agricultural Publications, 22 Gannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
The following article is a condensation of a more detailed report on the subject of synthetic soil conditioners which is available without cost by addressing the Office of Agricultural Publications, 22 Gannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Soil compaction by tractors: Irrigated soils may suffer from low water penetration limiting root development and reducing plant growth
by L. D. Doneen, D. W. Henderson, G. V. Ferry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The soil compaction problem can not be solved quickly by short-term means; it requires preventive long-range soil management.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The soil compaction problem can not be solved quickly by short-term means; it requires preventive long-range soil management.
Efficiency in fruit marketing: Packing labor efficiency and costs in California pear and apple packing plants influenced by varying factors
by B. C. French
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Part IV of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packinghouse equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act. Detailed reports are available by addressing the Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4.
Part IV of a series of reports of studies on the effects of packinghouse equipment, plant layout, and work methods on efficiency and costs. These studies have been made co-operatively by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, and the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, under the authority of the Research and Marketing Act. Detailed reports are available by addressing the Giannini Foundation, 207 Giannini Hall, University of California, Berkeley 4.
Small-seed legume harvesting: Clover and alfalfa seed threshing losses minimized by minor modifications and adjustments of present machines
by P. R. Bunnelle, L. G. Jones, R. A. Kepner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 115 field test runs made during the 1951 harvest season indicate that present harvesting machines, with minor modifications and careful adjustment, can do a satisfactory job of threshing seed of alfalfa and some kinds of clover—provided the load is kept at a reasonable level.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A total of 115 field test runs made during the 1951 harvest season indicate that present harvesting machines, with minor modifications and careful adjustment, can do a satisfactory job of threshing seed of alfalfa and some kinds of clover—provided the load is kept at a reasonable level.
Fryer marketing: Economies of continuous and batch systems compared in Hayward area
by John Abbott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Producers of chicken fryers in the Hayward area of Alameda County have a wide range of outlets through which their fryers can reach consumers.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Producers of chicken fryers in the Hayward area of Alameda County have a wide range of outlets through which their fryers can reach consumers.
Mites on citrus: Two chemicals show exceptional control possibilities in tests
by G. E. Carman, L. R. Jeppson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two of the newer chemicals show outstanding possibilities for the commercial grower's use to control mites injurious to citrus in California. The materials are specific acaricides—mite-killers—and therefore they are relatively nontoxic to beneficial insects, so treatments result in a minimal effect on insect parasites and predators as well as bees. Nor does their application effectively reduce populations of injurious insects.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two of the newer chemicals show outstanding possibilities for the commercial grower's use to control mites injurious to citrus in California. The materials are specific acaricides—mite-killers—and therefore they are relatively nontoxic to beneficial insects, so treatments result in a minimal effect on insect parasites and predators as well as bees. Nor does their application effectively reduce populations of injurious insects.
Dieldrin for thrips: Control of citrus thrips is possible but further studies are needed
by W. H. Ewart, H. S. Elmer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dieldrin has shown outstanding promise in the control of citrus thrips on oranges, grapefruit, and lemons during three years of experiments.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Dieldrin has shown outstanding promise in the control of citrus thrips on oranges, grapefruit, and lemons during three years of experiments.

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