California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.10

Citrus-root nematodes on olive trees
October 1951
Volume 5, Number 10

Research articles

Blood-spotting in eggs: Controlled by breeding in a ten-generation selection experiment with Single Comb White Leghorns
by Lewis W. Taylor, I. Michael Lerner, Dorothy C. Lowry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blood-spotting in chicken eggs can be controlled by breeding. Heredity is the most important known factor responsible for the tendency of birds to produce blood-spotted eggs. To study the influence of genetic differences between birds with respect to this common defect, a selection experiment was undertaken.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blood-spotting in chicken eggs can be controlled by breeding. Heredity is the most important known factor responsible for the tendency of birds to produce blood-spotted eggs. To study the influence of genetic differences between birds with respect to this common defect, a selection experiment was undertaken.
Lettuce growth rates: Investigations find heat unit accumulations not a reliable means of predicting harvest time
by Felipe J. Madariaga, J. E. Knott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lettuce growth rates depend primarily on the month of planting.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lettuce growth rates depend primarily on the month of planting.
Invisible injury of citrus: Insecticide tests indicate that oil sprays lower soluble solids in juice and reduce dry matter in leaves
by E. T. Bartholomew, Glenn E. Carman, William S. Stewart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Certain insecticides may produce invisible–internal–injury to the citrus plant.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Certain insecticides may produce invisible–internal–injury to the citrus plant.
Lithium toxicity in citrus: Recognized on leaves in a grove in Santa Barbara County on the basis of artificially produced symptoms
by D. G. Aldrich, A. P. Vanselow, G. R. Bradford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lithium toxicity in citrus was recognized for the first time in the field in Santa Barbara County. The element apparently came from irrigation water.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lithium toxicity in citrus was recognized for the first time in the field in Santa Barbara County. The element apparently came from irrigation water.
Citricola scale control: Tests find parathion a control agent of outstanding promise in commercial navel and Valencia orange groves
by W. H. Ewart, H. S. Elmer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial navel and Valencia orange groves in the San Joaquin Valley were used in experimental applications of parathion for citricola scale control in field tests during the period from 1947 to 1950.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial navel and Valencia orange groves in the San Joaquin Valley were used in experimental applications of parathion for citricola scale control in field tests during the period from 1947 to 1950.
Resistance to fumigation: Studies of outbreak in southern California reveal resistance to hydrogen cyanide fumigation persists
by Paul D. Gerhardt, David L. Lindgren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citricola scale–Coccus pseudomagnoliarum (Kuw.)–in citrus growing areas of California is still resistant to hydrogen cyanide–HCN–fumigation.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citricola scale–Coccus pseudomagnoliarum (Kuw.)–in citrus growing areas of California is still resistant to hydrogen cyanide–HCN–fumigation.
Westside dust test plots: Studies designed to develop plants and grazing systems for effective dust control under way in three counties
by Lloyd N. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dust–Of the dust storms in the southern San Joaquin Valley the past several years–comes from two sources: 1, the Westside Plains and 2, from farm leveling operations and subdivision development.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dust–Of the dust storms in the southern San Joaquin Valley the past several years–comes from two sources: 1, the Westside Plains and 2, from farm leveling operations and subdivision development.
Research at field stations: Local agricultural problems are studied and fundamental research applied in distributed outdoor laboratories
by B. A. Madson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Five field stations are an integral part of the College of Agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Five field stations are an integral part of the College of Agriculture.
Lemon fruit quality: Rootstocks affect juice content, soluble solids, acidity of Eurekas
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Eureka lemons to be used for processing are profitably grown on Sampson tangelo stock, while fruits from Rough lemon stock are not desirable.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Eureka lemons to be used for processing are profitably grown on Sampson tangelo stock, while fruits from Rough lemon stock are not desirable.
Citrus-root nematodes on olive: Pest pathologically and morphologically similar to that on orange roots infests and reproduces on olive roots
by R. C. Baines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The olive is a new host of the citrus-root nematode.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The olive is a new host of the citrus-root nematode.
Nontoxic ferns: Feeding tests with cattle find gold fern, bird's foot fern nontoxic
by K. A. Wagnon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: No evidence of toxicity was found in gold fern and bird's foot fern, two plants suspected to cause jimmies–or jitters– in cattle moved to and from mountain ranges.
Not available – first paragraph follows: No evidence of toxicity was found in gold fern and bird's foot fern, two plants suspected to cause jimmies–or jitters– in cattle moved to and from mountain ranges.
Swine production: Main factors of improvement are prolificacy, milk production, type
by Hubert Heitman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Swine production can be improved by using purebreds with records consistent in prolificacy, milk production, and type.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Swine production can be improved by using purebreds with records consistent in prolificacy, milk production, and type.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.10

Citrus-root nematodes on olive trees
October 1951
Volume 5, Number 10

Research articles

Blood-spotting in eggs: Controlled by breeding in a ten-generation selection experiment with Single Comb White Leghorns
by Lewis W. Taylor, I. Michael Lerner, Dorothy C. Lowry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blood-spotting in chicken eggs can be controlled by breeding. Heredity is the most important known factor responsible for the tendency of birds to produce blood-spotted eggs. To study the influence of genetic differences between birds with respect to this common defect, a selection experiment was undertaken.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Blood-spotting in chicken eggs can be controlled by breeding. Heredity is the most important known factor responsible for the tendency of birds to produce blood-spotted eggs. To study the influence of genetic differences between birds with respect to this common defect, a selection experiment was undertaken.
Lettuce growth rates: Investigations find heat unit accumulations not a reliable means of predicting harvest time
by Felipe J. Madariaga, J. E. Knott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lettuce growth rates depend primarily on the month of planting.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lettuce growth rates depend primarily on the month of planting.
Invisible injury of citrus: Insecticide tests indicate that oil sprays lower soluble solids in juice and reduce dry matter in leaves
by E. T. Bartholomew, Glenn E. Carman, William S. Stewart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Certain insecticides may produce invisible–internal–injury to the citrus plant.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Certain insecticides may produce invisible–internal–injury to the citrus plant.
Lithium toxicity in citrus: Recognized on leaves in a grove in Santa Barbara County on the basis of artificially produced symptoms
by D. G. Aldrich, A. P. Vanselow, G. R. Bradford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lithium toxicity in citrus was recognized for the first time in the field in Santa Barbara County. The element apparently came from irrigation water.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lithium toxicity in citrus was recognized for the first time in the field in Santa Barbara County. The element apparently came from irrigation water.
Citricola scale control: Tests find parathion a control agent of outstanding promise in commercial navel and Valencia orange groves
by W. H. Ewart, H. S. Elmer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial navel and Valencia orange groves in the San Joaquin Valley were used in experimental applications of parathion for citricola scale control in field tests during the period from 1947 to 1950.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Commercial navel and Valencia orange groves in the San Joaquin Valley were used in experimental applications of parathion for citricola scale control in field tests during the period from 1947 to 1950.
Resistance to fumigation: Studies of outbreak in southern California reveal resistance to hydrogen cyanide fumigation persists
by Paul D. Gerhardt, David L. Lindgren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citricola scale–Coccus pseudomagnoliarum (Kuw.)–in citrus growing areas of California is still resistant to hydrogen cyanide–HCN–fumigation.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citricola scale–Coccus pseudomagnoliarum (Kuw.)–in citrus growing areas of California is still resistant to hydrogen cyanide–HCN–fumigation.
Westside dust test plots: Studies designed to develop plants and grazing systems for effective dust control under way in three counties
by Lloyd N. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dust–Of the dust storms in the southern San Joaquin Valley the past several years–comes from two sources: 1, the Westside Plains and 2, from farm leveling operations and subdivision development.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The dust–Of the dust storms in the southern San Joaquin Valley the past several years–comes from two sources: 1, the Westside Plains and 2, from farm leveling operations and subdivision development.
Research at field stations: Local agricultural problems are studied and fundamental research applied in distributed outdoor laboratories
by B. A. Madson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Five field stations are an integral part of the College of Agriculture.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Five field stations are an integral part of the College of Agriculture.
Lemon fruit quality: Rootstocks affect juice content, soluble solids, acidity of Eurekas
by W. P. Bitters
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Eureka lemons to be used for processing are profitably grown on Sampson tangelo stock, while fruits from Rough lemon stock are not desirable.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Eureka lemons to be used for processing are profitably grown on Sampson tangelo stock, while fruits from Rough lemon stock are not desirable.
Citrus-root nematodes on olive: Pest pathologically and morphologically similar to that on orange roots infests and reproduces on olive roots
by R. C. Baines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The olive is a new host of the citrus-root nematode.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The olive is a new host of the citrus-root nematode.
Nontoxic ferns: Feeding tests with cattle find gold fern, bird's foot fern nontoxic
by K. A. Wagnon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: No evidence of toxicity was found in gold fern and bird's foot fern, two plants suspected to cause jimmies–or jitters– in cattle moved to and from mountain ranges.
Not available – first paragraph follows: No evidence of toxicity was found in gold fern and bird's foot fern, two plants suspected to cause jimmies–or jitters– in cattle moved to and from mountain ranges.
Swine production: Main factors of improvement are prolificacy, milk production, type
by Hubert Heitman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Swine production can be improved by using purebreds with records consistent in prolificacy, milk production, and type.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Swine production can be improved by using purebreds with records consistent in prolificacy, milk production, and type.

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