California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.11

Pear pulp and pear molasses as livestock food
November 1951
Volume 5, Number 11

Research articles

Determination of organic acids: Chromatography several times as sensitive as standard method in detecting acids in wine, juices, plant extracts
by Chester E. Kean, George L. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The nonvolatile organic acids of fruit, vegetable and plant extracts can be determined by a simple, sensitive, and comparatively rapid method.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The nonvolatile organic acids of fruit, vegetable and plant extracts can be determined by a simple, sensitive, and comparatively rapid method.
Orange yield and fruit size: Long-term experiments test the effects of organic matter in covercrops and manure on trees in southern California
by E. R. Parker, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Organic matter from winter cover-crops or other sources increased orange yields in an experimental orchard at Riverside.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Organic matter from winter cover-crops or other sources increased orange yields in an experimental orchard at Riverside.
Boysenberry fertilization: Yield, fruit size, quality improved by nitrogen but not phosphorus or potash applications in Fresno County test
by Richard A. Break
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boysenberry and youngberry plants are most likely to respond to nitrogen.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boysenberry and youngberry plants are most likely to respond to nitrogen.
Pear pulp and pear molasses: Nutritional value for cattle and palatability to sheep tested in feeding trials with commercial products
by H. R. Guilbert, W. C. Weir
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Pear molasses and pear pulp are two by-product feeds–highly palatable to sheep and cattle–which recently became available to the livestock industry.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Pear molasses and pear pulp are two by-product feeds–highly palatable to sheep and cattle–which recently became available to the livestock industry.
Stink bug on pears: Habits of pest studied to find a control program which may include sprays, clean culture, host plant eradication
by Arthur D. Borden, Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The consperse stink bug–Euschistus conspersus Uhler–caused considerable loss of pears at harvest during the past two fruit seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The consperse stink bug–Euschistus conspersus Uhler–caused considerable loss of pears at harvest during the past two fruit seasons.
Cartons for lemon shipments: Open-top and sealed boxes of corrugated paper compared with standard boxes US to costs and fruit delivery
by Roy J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new type of corrugated carton, used for lemon shipments, saves from 34¢ to 45¢ per standard box.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new type of corrugated carton, used for lemon shipments, saves from 34¢ to 45¢ per standard box.
Potato growth studies: Air and soil temperatures compared in Kern County potato fields during spring and early summer
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil temperatures in Kern County potato fields average from 60° F to 70° F at 6” depth, with foliage cooling the soil about 8° F, and irrigation some 4° F.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil temperatures in Kern County potato fields average from 60° F to 70° F at 6” depth, with foliage cooling the soil about 8° F, and irrigation some 4° F.
Poultry breeding: Long-term selection studies aim at breaking through the ceiling limiting further improvement of economic traits
by I. Michael Lerner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Most breeders of chickens who start with average or below-average commercial flocks have little difficulty in obtaining improvement by selection of economic characters.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Most breeders of chickens who start with average or below-average commercial flocks have little difficulty in obtaining improvement by selection of economic characters.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 5, No.11

Pear pulp and pear molasses as livestock food
November 1951
Volume 5, Number 11

Research articles

Determination of organic acids: Chromatography several times as sensitive as standard method in detecting acids in wine, juices, plant extracts
by Chester E. Kean, George L. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The nonvolatile organic acids of fruit, vegetable and plant extracts can be determined by a simple, sensitive, and comparatively rapid method.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The nonvolatile organic acids of fruit, vegetable and plant extracts can be determined by a simple, sensitive, and comparatively rapid method.
Orange yield and fruit size: Long-term experiments test the effects of organic matter in covercrops and manure on trees in southern California
by E. R. Parker, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Organic matter from winter cover-crops or other sources increased orange yields in an experimental orchard at Riverside.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Organic matter from winter cover-crops or other sources increased orange yields in an experimental orchard at Riverside.
Boysenberry fertilization: Yield, fruit size, quality improved by nitrogen but not phosphorus or potash applications in Fresno County test
by Richard A. Break
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boysenberry and youngberry plants are most likely to respond to nitrogen.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Boysenberry and youngberry plants are most likely to respond to nitrogen.
Pear pulp and pear molasses: Nutritional value for cattle and palatability to sheep tested in feeding trials with commercial products
by H. R. Guilbert, W. C. Weir
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Pear molasses and pear pulp are two by-product feeds–highly palatable to sheep and cattle–which recently became available to the livestock industry.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Pear molasses and pear pulp are two by-product feeds–highly palatable to sheep and cattle–which recently became available to the livestock industry.
Stink bug on pears: Habits of pest studied to find a control program which may include sprays, clean culture, host plant eradication
by Arthur D. Borden, Harold F. Madsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The consperse stink bug–Euschistus conspersus Uhler–caused considerable loss of pears at harvest during the past two fruit seasons.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The consperse stink bug–Euschistus conspersus Uhler–caused considerable loss of pears at harvest during the past two fruit seasons.
Cartons for lemon shipments: Open-top and sealed boxes of corrugated paper compared with standard boxes US to costs and fruit delivery
by Roy J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new type of corrugated carton, used for lemon shipments, saves from 34¢ to 45¢ per standard box.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new type of corrugated carton, used for lemon shipments, saves from 34¢ to 45¢ per standard box.
Potato growth studies: Air and soil temperatures compared in Kern County potato fields during spring and early summer
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil temperatures in Kern County potato fields average from 60° F to 70° F at 6” depth, with foliage cooling the soil about 8° F, and irrigation some 4° F.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil temperatures in Kern County potato fields average from 60° F to 70° F at 6” depth, with foliage cooling the soil about 8° F, and irrigation some 4° F.
Poultry breeding: Long-term selection studies aim at breaking through the ceiling limiting further improvement of economic traits
by I. Michael Lerner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Most breeders of chickens who start with average or below-average commercial flocks have little difficulty in obtaining improvement by selection of economic characters.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Most breeders of chickens who start with average or below-average commercial flocks have little difficulty in obtaining improvement by selection of economic characters.

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