California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

May-June 1990
Volume 44, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Investing in agricultural research and development
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  
New agriculture deans for two UC campuses
by John E. Kinsella, Seymour D. Van Gundy
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three common pests of pistachio in California
by Themis J. Michailides
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Botryosphaeria blight shares outward symptoms with Botrytis blight and citrus flat mite. Correct pest diagnosis is crucial to effective control.
Similar symptoms do not always indicate the same problem. Only close examination reveals the difference between early Botrytis and Botryosphaeria blights on pistachio. Later on, Botryosphaeria blight can be confused with an infestation of citrus flat mite.
Grape pruning methods can affect Botrytis bunch rot
by Phil A. Phillips, John H. Foott, Lizanne Righetti
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two training and pruning techniques improve air circulation around fruit clusters, reducing the incidence of disease.
The vineyard training/pruning system can dramatically influence the amount of Botrytis bunch rot. Trying to achieve better light reception can impede air movement and result in greater incidence of rot.
Water quality and subsurface soil variabilities affect infiItration
by Jan W. Hopmans, Jim MacIntyre, Randal J. Southard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil response to irrigation depends in part on chemical and physical structure. Less water infiltrated the test soil after irrigation with sodium-amended water.
Variations in the soil's chemical or physical structure may affect its ability to absorb water. By adding sodium to irrigation water, researchers decreased infiltration during subsequent irrigations. In addition, the thickness and character of soil layers may obscure infiltration effects of tillage and water quality.
Parasites for filth fly control on dairies
by Jeffery A. Meyer, Bradley A. Mullens, Tracy L. Cyr, Clare Stokes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Naturally occurring parasites controlled flies more effectively than those released experimentally by southern California researchers.
Short-term releases of commercial fly parasites on dairies did not improve overall fly control. Naturally occurring fly parasites were found to be significant mortality factors.
Global warming and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta
by Samuel H. Logan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A 1-foot rise in ocean levels would dramatically alter the maintenance requirements of Delta levees.
The likelihood of global warming and its potential consequences are major concerns to global climate researchers, government officials, and members of the public. Conferences, workshops, and various publications have considered the effects of higher global temperatures on ocean levels, rainfall, and other climatic variables.
Money Sense makes a difference
by Karen P. Varcoe, Joan Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This financial education program for families shows real results.
The “Money Sense” program teaches low-income families how to overcome one of their biggest problems, managing finances. As this study shows, the program improves participants' resource management skills and can lead to changes in their quality of life.
Granulosis virus: biological control for western grapeleaf skeletonizer
by Vernon M. Stern, Brian A. Federici
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Western grapeleaf skeletonizer (WGLS) larvae progress side-by-side across the leaf, eating all but a lacey framework as they go. Widespread application of a potent virus could eliminate this major grape-vine pest. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
Granulosis virus disease of western grapeleaf skeletonizer acts much like a classical biological control agent. Infected males transmit the disease to healthy females during mating, and infected females transmit it to their offspring. Egg production is reduced and larval mortality is very high.
Storage potential of fresh ‘Manzanillo’ olives
by Adel A. Kader, George D. Nanos, Eduardo L. Kerbel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Processors can generate less wastewater by storing olives without brine, using a reduced-oxygen atmosphere instead.
Ideal preprocessing storage for fresh, green ‘Manzanillo’ olives is at 41° to 45° F (5° to 7.5°C) and 90 to 95% relative humidity. Under these conditions, the olives can be stored for 6 to 8 weeks in air, or 9 to 12 weeks in a 2% oxygen atmosphere with no significant loss in quality.
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http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=44_3

May-June 1990
Volume 44, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Investing in agricultural research and development
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  
New agriculture deans for two UC campuses
by John E. Kinsella, Seymour D. Van Gundy
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three common pests of pistachio in California
by Themis J. Michailides
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Botryosphaeria blight shares outward symptoms with Botrytis blight and citrus flat mite. Correct pest diagnosis is crucial to effective control.
Similar symptoms do not always indicate the same problem. Only close examination reveals the difference between early Botrytis and Botryosphaeria blights on pistachio. Later on, Botryosphaeria blight can be confused with an infestation of citrus flat mite.
Grape pruning methods can affect Botrytis bunch rot
by Phil A. Phillips, John H. Foott, Lizanne Righetti
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two training and pruning techniques improve air circulation around fruit clusters, reducing the incidence of disease.
The vineyard training/pruning system can dramatically influence the amount of Botrytis bunch rot. Trying to achieve better light reception can impede air movement and result in greater incidence of rot.
Water quality and subsurface soil variabilities affect infiItration
by Jan W. Hopmans, Jim MacIntyre, Randal J. Southard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil response to irrigation depends in part on chemical and physical structure. Less water infiltrated the test soil after irrigation with sodium-amended water.
Variations in the soil's chemical or physical structure may affect its ability to absorb water. By adding sodium to irrigation water, researchers decreased infiltration during subsequent irrigations. In addition, the thickness and character of soil layers may obscure infiltration effects of tillage and water quality.
Parasites for filth fly control on dairies
by Jeffery A. Meyer, Bradley A. Mullens, Tracy L. Cyr, Clare Stokes
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Naturally occurring parasites controlled flies more effectively than those released experimentally by southern California researchers.
Short-term releases of commercial fly parasites on dairies did not improve overall fly control. Naturally occurring fly parasites were found to be significant mortality factors.
Global warming and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta
by Samuel H. Logan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A 1-foot rise in ocean levels would dramatically alter the maintenance requirements of Delta levees.
The likelihood of global warming and its potential consequences are major concerns to global climate researchers, government officials, and members of the public. Conferences, workshops, and various publications have considered the effects of higher global temperatures on ocean levels, rainfall, and other climatic variables.
Money Sense makes a difference
by Karen P. Varcoe, Joan Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This financial education program for families shows real results.
The “Money Sense” program teaches low-income families how to overcome one of their biggest problems, managing finances. As this study shows, the program improves participants' resource management skills and can lead to changes in their quality of life.
Granulosis virus: biological control for western grapeleaf skeletonizer
by Vernon M. Stern, Brian A. Federici
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Western grapeleaf skeletonizer (WGLS) larvae progress side-by-side across the leaf, eating all but a lacey framework as they go. Widespread application of a potent virus could eliminate this major grape-vine pest. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
Granulosis virus disease of western grapeleaf skeletonizer acts much like a classical biological control agent. Infected males transmit the disease to healthy females during mating, and infected females transmit it to their offspring. Egg production is reduced and larval mortality is very high.
Storage potential of fresh ‘Manzanillo’ olives
by Adel A. Kader, George D. Nanos, Eduardo L. Kerbel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Processors can generate less wastewater by storing olives without brine, using a reduced-oxygen atmosphere instead.
Ideal preprocessing storage for fresh, green ‘Manzanillo’ olives is at 41° to 45° F (5° to 7.5°C) and 90 to 95% relative humidity. Under these conditions, the olives can be stored for 6 to 8 weeks in air, or 9 to 12 weeks in a 2% oxygen atmosphere with no significant loss in quality.

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