California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

March-April 1986
Volume 40, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Students show low awareness of agricultural careers
by Mary E. Mallory, Robert Sommer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
High school students surveyed had a limited awareness of such careers.
‘Escaped’ artichokes are troublesome pests
by Craig D. Thomsen, G. Douglas Barbe, William A. Williams, Melvin R. George
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cultivated artichokes can revert to a wild, hard-to-control thistle formThe century-old battle against artichoke thistle — the wild relative of that epicurean delight, globe artichoke — is not over. Dense infestations that take over prime grazing land persist in many areas of the state. Control costs can exceed the value of the land.
Borer control in young almond trees
by Robert A. Van Steenwyk, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Leslie W. Barclay, Everett L. Younce
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
An insecticide/paint combination applied when feeding is detected prevents damage.
Farm labor contractors
by Suzanne Vaupel, Philip L. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
They provide about a fifth of all farmworkers in CaliforniaFarm labor contracting has a long history in California and still provides a major share of farmworkers.
Presence-absence sampling of citrus red mite
by Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson, Charles E. Kennett, Neil V. O'Connell, Donald L. Flaherty, Joseph G. Morse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The speed and simplicity of the system make it highly practicalSampling is a fast and practical alternative to an exhaustive count of the tiny mite and its predators.
Boron application in vineyards
by Peter Christensen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Berm sprays or hand applications are favored for small amounts neededAnnual berm or foliar sprays gave best boron uptake. Hand-broadcasting was less efficient but still useful.
Effects of switching to 3X milking
by Douglas D. Gisl, Edward J. DePeters, Clement L. Pelissier
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Greater yield has to be weighed against higher costs and a need for better managementHerd records for three years showed milk production increases with 3X but confirmed the need for good management.
Residual available phosporus in soils
by Parker F. Pratt, Robert M. Lippert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Present tests fall short of needsThe soil test as an indicator of available phosphorus must be interpreted differently depending on soil type.
Clues to control of bluetongue virus
by Bradley A. Mullens, Edmond C. Loomis, John R. Anderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Control strategy aimed at early life stages of vector gnats is one possibilityA key to reducing the sheep and cattle disease is in controlling the blood-sucking gnat that transmits it.
Nemacur residues in turfgrass
by Donald Peterson, Wray Winterlin, Laurence R. Costello
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effectively controls nematodes but remains in soil many monthsResidues of the nematicide used on golf greens declined quickly to low, but persistent, levels.
Pest management affects spider mites in vineyards
by Greg M. English-Loeb, Donald L. Flaherty, Lloyd T. Wilson, William W. Barnett, George M. Leavitt, William H. Settle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Powdery mildew and leafhopper controls affect predator populations differentlyA new leafhopper pest and a change of powdery mildew fungicide have affected mites in San Joaquin Valley vineyards.
The economics of IPM in processing tomatoes
by John M. Antle, Seong K. Park
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Even without considering risk reduction, which is significant, the benefits of IPM outweigh the costs.

News and opinion

Earning public support
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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March-April 1986
Volume 40, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Students show low awareness of agricultural careers
by Mary E. Mallory, Robert Sommer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
High school students surveyed had a limited awareness of such careers.
‘Escaped’ artichokes are troublesome pests
by Craig D. Thomsen, G. Douglas Barbe, William A. Williams, Melvin R. George
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cultivated artichokes can revert to a wild, hard-to-control thistle formThe century-old battle against artichoke thistle — the wild relative of that epicurean delight, globe artichoke — is not over. Dense infestations that take over prime grazing land persist in many areas of the state. Control costs can exceed the value of the land.
Borer control in young almond trees
by Robert A. Van Steenwyk, Lonnie C. Hendricks, Leslie W. Barclay, Everett L. Younce
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
An insecticide/paint combination applied when feeding is detected prevents damage.
Farm labor contractors
by Suzanne Vaupel, Philip L. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
They provide about a fifth of all farmworkers in CaliforniaFarm labor contracting has a long history in California and still provides a major share of farmworkers.
Presence-absence sampling of citrus red mite
by Frank G. Zalom, Lloyd T. Wilson, Charles E. Kennett, Neil V. O'Connell, Donald L. Flaherty, Joseph G. Morse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The speed and simplicity of the system make it highly practicalSampling is a fast and practical alternative to an exhaustive count of the tiny mite and its predators.
Boron application in vineyards
by Peter Christensen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Berm sprays or hand applications are favored for small amounts neededAnnual berm or foliar sprays gave best boron uptake. Hand-broadcasting was less efficient but still useful.
Effects of switching to 3X milking
by Douglas D. Gisl, Edward J. DePeters, Clement L. Pelissier
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Greater yield has to be weighed against higher costs and a need for better managementHerd records for three years showed milk production increases with 3X but confirmed the need for good management.
Residual available phosporus in soils
by Parker F. Pratt, Robert M. Lippert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Present tests fall short of needsThe soil test as an indicator of available phosphorus must be interpreted differently depending on soil type.
Clues to control of bluetongue virus
by Bradley A. Mullens, Edmond C. Loomis, John R. Anderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Control strategy aimed at early life stages of vector gnats is one possibilityA key to reducing the sheep and cattle disease is in controlling the blood-sucking gnat that transmits it.
Nemacur residues in turfgrass
by Donald Peterson, Wray Winterlin, Laurence R. Costello
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effectively controls nematodes but remains in soil many monthsResidues of the nematicide used on golf greens declined quickly to low, but persistent, levels.
Pest management affects spider mites in vineyards
by Greg M. English-Loeb, Donald L. Flaherty, Lloyd T. Wilson, William W. Barnett, George M. Leavitt, William H. Settle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Powdery mildew and leafhopper controls affect predator populations differentlyA new leafhopper pest and a change of powdery mildew fungicide have affected mites in San Joaquin Valley vineyards.
The economics of IPM in processing tomatoes
by John M. Antle, Seong K. Park
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Even without considering risk reduction, which is significant, the benefits of IPM outweigh the costs.

News and opinion

Earning public support
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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