California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

January-February 1983
Volume 37, Number 1

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Degree-days: An aid in crop and pest management
by Lloyd T. Wilson, William W. Barnett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Questions such as when to plant, whether the crop is developing on time, and when to initiate pest control actions are particularly difficult to answer, because the timing is not always the same each year. Growth and development of insects and plants can vary as much as two to three weeks from the “normal” time, depending on whether temperatures are above or below the average. In this article we compare different techniques for predicting temperature-related insect population and crop development.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Questions such as when to plant, whether the crop is developing on time, and when to initiate pest control actions are particularly difficult to answer, because the timing is not always the same each year. Growth and development of insects and plants can vary as much as two to three weeks from the “normal” time, depending on whether temperatures are above or below the average. In this article we compare different techniques for predicting temperature-related insect population and crop development.
Weedy species of rice show promise for disease resistance
by J. Neil Rutger, Robert K. Webster, Richard A. Figoni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Breeders are using weedy species as reservoirs of genes for resistance
Evaluating low-volume irrigation systems for emission uniformity
by Dale Handley, Henry J. Vaux, Nigel Pickering
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Performance relates more to design and maintenance than to physical deterioration
Lepidopterous pests of tomatoes in southern desert valleys
by Robert A. Van Steenwyk
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: California produces approximately 30 percent of the total U.S. production of fresh market tomatoes and approximately 85 percent of the processing tomatoes. Of the California total, the southern desert valleys produce about 10 percent of the fresh market and 5 percent of the processing tomatoes. The tomato fruitworm, tobacco budworm, and beet armyworm are major pests of both fresh market and processing tomatoes in the southern desert valleys, attacking the fruit and sometimes causing serious economic loss. The tomato fruitworm and beet armyworm also are major pests of tomatoes in other areas of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: California produces approximately 30 percent of the total U.S. production of fresh market tomatoes and approximately 85 percent of the processing tomatoes. Of the California total, the southern desert valleys produce about 10 percent of the fresh market and 5 percent of the processing tomatoes. The tomato fruitworm, tobacco budworm, and beet armyworm are major pests of both fresh market and processing tomatoes in the southern desert valleys, attacking the fruit and sometimes causing serious economic loss. The tomato fruitworm and beet armyworm also are major pests of tomatoes in other areas of California.
Immigration reform and California agriculture
by Philip L. Martin, Richard Mines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) believes that four to six million aliens are living and working illegally in the United States. Every year, the INS makes almost one million apprehensions of undocumented workers, 90 percent of them Mexicans. Fewer than one million individuals are caught, because some persons are apprehended several times in a year. Even though more illegal aliens appear to be employed outside than inside agriculture (see table), they are often assumed to be only an agricultural problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) believes that four to six million aliens are living and working illegally in the United States. Every year, the INS makes almost one million apprehensions of undocumented workers, 90 percent of them Mexicans. Fewer than one million individuals are caught, because some persons are apprehended several times in a year. Even though more illegal aliens appear to be employed outside than inside agriculture (see table), they are often assumed to be only an agricultural problem.
Minimizing postharvest diseases of kiwifruit
by Noel F. Sommer, Robert J. Fortlage, Donald C. Edwards
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Careful handling and proper storage are crucial to avoid postharvest losses
Biofuel resources mapping for energy planning
by Mark Meo, Scott Sachs, Peter J. Hunter, Ernest Bullock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Land Use Mapping Program (LUMP) can be used to inventory crop residues
The California peripheral canal: Who backed it, who fought it
by Douglas Gwynn, Orville E. Thompson, Kathleen L'Ecluse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Powerful pro- and anti-canal alliances formed in this battle over water
Crust control aids seedling emergence
by Burton J. Hoyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Proper application of chemical anticrustant improved chances of a good seedling stand
Effects of malathion sprays on the ice plant insect system
by Jan A. Washburn, Richard L. Tassan, Kenneth Grace, Eric Bellis, Kenneth S. Hagen, Gordon W. Frankie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Few adult natural enemies survived one spray, but populations recovered quickly

News and Opinion

An agenda for U.S. agriculture's future
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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January-February 1983
Volume 37, Number 1

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Degree-days: An aid in crop and pest management
by Lloyd T. Wilson, William W. Barnett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Questions such as when to plant, whether the crop is developing on time, and when to initiate pest control actions are particularly difficult to answer, because the timing is not always the same each year. Growth and development of insects and plants can vary as much as two to three weeks from the “normal” time, depending on whether temperatures are above or below the average. In this article we compare different techniques for predicting temperature-related insect population and crop development.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Questions such as when to plant, whether the crop is developing on time, and when to initiate pest control actions are particularly difficult to answer, because the timing is not always the same each year. Growth and development of insects and plants can vary as much as two to three weeks from the “normal” time, depending on whether temperatures are above or below the average. In this article we compare different techniques for predicting temperature-related insect population and crop development.
Weedy species of rice show promise for disease resistance
by J. Neil Rutger, Robert K. Webster, Richard A. Figoni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Breeders are using weedy species as reservoirs of genes for resistance
Evaluating low-volume irrigation systems for emission uniformity
by Dale Handley, Henry J. Vaux, Nigel Pickering
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Performance relates more to design and maintenance than to physical deterioration
Lepidopterous pests of tomatoes in southern desert valleys
by Robert A. Van Steenwyk
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: California produces approximately 30 percent of the total U.S. production of fresh market tomatoes and approximately 85 percent of the processing tomatoes. Of the California total, the southern desert valleys produce about 10 percent of the fresh market and 5 percent of the processing tomatoes. The tomato fruitworm, tobacco budworm, and beet armyworm are major pests of both fresh market and processing tomatoes in the southern desert valleys, attacking the fruit and sometimes causing serious economic loss. The tomato fruitworm and beet armyworm also are major pests of tomatoes in other areas of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: California produces approximately 30 percent of the total U.S. production of fresh market tomatoes and approximately 85 percent of the processing tomatoes. Of the California total, the southern desert valleys produce about 10 percent of the fresh market and 5 percent of the processing tomatoes. The tomato fruitworm, tobacco budworm, and beet armyworm are major pests of both fresh market and processing tomatoes in the southern desert valleys, attacking the fruit and sometimes causing serious economic loss. The tomato fruitworm and beet armyworm also are major pests of tomatoes in other areas of California.
Immigration reform and California agriculture
by Philip L. Martin, Richard Mines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) believes that four to six million aliens are living and working illegally in the United States. Every year, the INS makes almost one million apprehensions of undocumented workers, 90 percent of them Mexicans. Fewer than one million individuals are caught, because some persons are apprehended several times in a year. Even though more illegal aliens appear to be employed outside than inside agriculture (see table), they are often assumed to be only an agricultural problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) believes that four to six million aliens are living and working illegally in the United States. Every year, the INS makes almost one million apprehensions of undocumented workers, 90 percent of them Mexicans. Fewer than one million individuals are caught, because some persons are apprehended several times in a year. Even though more illegal aliens appear to be employed outside than inside agriculture (see table), they are often assumed to be only an agricultural problem.
Minimizing postharvest diseases of kiwifruit
by Noel F. Sommer, Robert J. Fortlage, Donald C. Edwards
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Careful handling and proper storage are crucial to avoid postharvest losses
Biofuel resources mapping for energy planning
by Mark Meo, Scott Sachs, Peter J. Hunter, Ernest Bullock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The Land Use Mapping Program (LUMP) can be used to inventory crop residues
The California peripheral canal: Who backed it, who fought it
by Douglas Gwynn, Orville E. Thompson, Kathleen L'Ecluse
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Powerful pro- and anti-canal alliances formed in this battle over water
Crust control aids seedling emergence
by Burton J. Hoyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Proper application of chemical anticrustant improved chances of a good seedling stand
Effects of malathion sprays on the ice plant insect system
by Jan A. Washburn, Richard L. Tassan, Kenneth Grace, Eric Bellis, Kenneth S. Hagen, Gordon W. Frankie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Few adult natural enemies survived one spray, but populations recovered quickly

News and Opinion

An agenda for U.S. agriculture's future
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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