California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 30, No.1

Cover:  Grape harvester removing lemons from close-set trees near Santa Paula. Fruit is conveyed into cushioned bed of pickup truck.
January 1976
Volume 30, Number 1

Research articles

Soil fumigation: One way to cleanse nematode-infested vineyard lands
by D. J. Raski, N. O. Jones, J. J. Kissler, D. A. Luvisi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In recent years there have been some exciting successes using deep-placement, high-dosage soil fumigation to produce flourishing grapevines where previous crops have failed due to nematodes. Replanting new grapevines on their own roots in nematode infested soils can be disastrous because nematode attacks may destroy the developing root systems, restrict plant vigor, and reduce potential yields. In extreme cases young vines are stunted by nematodes and never develop sufficient vigor to produce a full crop.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In recent years there have been some exciting successes using deep-placement, high-dosage soil fumigation to produce flourishing grapevines where previous crops have failed due to nematodes. Replanting new grapevines on their own roots in nematode infested soils can be disastrous because nematode attacks may destroy the developing root systems, restrict plant vigor, and reduce potential yields. In extreme cases young vines are stunted by nematodes and never develop sufficient vigor to produce a full crop.
Mechanical harvesting of Jojoba
by D.M. Yermanos, R. Gonzales
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: If jojoba could be pruned to resemble tree-like plants recently found growing wild in Baja California, nuts could be harvested with existing equipment, making commercial jojoba plantations economically feasible.
If jojoba could be pruned to resemble tree-like plants recently found growing wild in Baja California, nuts could be harvested with existing equipment, making commercial jojoba plantations economically feasible.
Lemon picking with a grape harvester
by R. M. Burns, S. B. Boswell, B. Keillor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: From 40 to 90 percent of the mature lemon fruit on young close-set or trellis-grown trees have been removed mechanically by a grape harvester in 3 years of field trials in Ventura County. Abscission chemicals to loosen the fruit and growth inhibitors to retard the tree foliage proved helpful.
From 40 to 90 percent of the mature lemon fruit on young close-set or trellis-grown trees have been removed mechanically by a grape harvester in 3 years of field trials in Ventura County. Abscission chemicals to loosen the fruit and growth inhibitors to retard the tree foliage proved helpful.
Chemical control of powdery mildew on sugar beets
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two applications of sulfur dust at 35 or 40 pounds per acre gave good control of sugar beet powdery mildew and was superior to Benomyl, wettable sulfur, cupric hydroxide, or three proprietary fungicides. None of the materials was phytotoxic.
Two applications of sulfur dust at 35 or 40 pounds per acre gave good control of sugar beet powdery mildew and was superior to Benomyl, wettable sulfur, cupric hydroxide, or three proprietary fungicides. None of the materials was phytotoxic.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 30, No.1

Cover:  Grape harvester removing lemons from close-set trees near Santa Paula. Fruit is conveyed into cushioned bed of pickup truck.
January 1976
Volume 30, Number 1

Research articles

Soil fumigation: One way to cleanse nematode-infested vineyard lands
by D. J. Raski, N. O. Jones, J. J. Kissler, D. A. Luvisi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In recent years there have been some exciting successes using deep-placement, high-dosage soil fumigation to produce flourishing grapevines where previous crops have failed due to nematodes. Replanting new grapevines on their own roots in nematode infested soils can be disastrous because nematode attacks may destroy the developing root systems, restrict plant vigor, and reduce potential yields. In extreme cases young vines are stunted by nematodes and never develop sufficient vigor to produce a full crop.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In recent years there have been some exciting successes using deep-placement, high-dosage soil fumigation to produce flourishing grapevines where previous crops have failed due to nematodes. Replanting new grapevines on their own roots in nematode infested soils can be disastrous because nematode attacks may destroy the developing root systems, restrict plant vigor, and reduce potential yields. In extreme cases young vines are stunted by nematodes and never develop sufficient vigor to produce a full crop.
Mechanical harvesting of Jojoba
by D.M. Yermanos, R. Gonzales
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: If jojoba could be pruned to resemble tree-like plants recently found growing wild in Baja California, nuts could be harvested with existing equipment, making commercial jojoba plantations economically feasible.
If jojoba could be pruned to resemble tree-like plants recently found growing wild in Baja California, nuts could be harvested with existing equipment, making commercial jojoba plantations economically feasible.
Lemon picking with a grape harvester
by R. M. Burns, S. B. Boswell, B. Keillor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: From 40 to 90 percent of the mature lemon fruit on young close-set or trellis-grown trees have been removed mechanically by a grape harvester in 3 years of field trials in Ventura County. Abscission chemicals to loosen the fruit and growth inhibitors to retard the tree foliage proved helpful.
From 40 to 90 percent of the mature lemon fruit on young close-set or trellis-grown trees have been removed mechanically by a grape harvester in 3 years of field trials in Ventura County. Abscission chemicals to loosen the fruit and growth inhibitors to retard the tree foliage proved helpful.
Chemical control of powdery mildew on sugar beets
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two applications of sulfur dust at 35 or 40 pounds per acre gave good control of sugar beet powdery mildew and was superior to Benomyl, wettable sulfur, cupric hydroxide, or three proprietary fungicides. None of the materials was phytotoxic.
Two applications of sulfur dust at 35 or 40 pounds per acre gave good control of sugar beet powdery mildew and was superior to Benomyl, wettable sulfur, cupric hydroxide, or three proprietary fungicides. None of the materials was phytotoxic.

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