California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.12

Cover:  Emperor penguins at Cope Crozier.
December 1975
Volume 29, Number 12

Research articles

Comparative biochemistry of Antarctic proteins
by Robert E. Feeney, David T. Osuga
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The UCD team of agricultural scientists has been studying the proteins of Antarctic species for 11 years, starting in 1964. During the first seven years, trips were made each year to Antarctica to study and obtain specimens from penguins and cold-adapted fishes.
The UCD team of agricultural scientists has been studying the proteins of Antarctic species for 11 years, starting in 1964. During the first seven years, trips were made each year to Antarctica to study and obtain specimens from penguins and cold-adapted fishes.
Chemical Control of the Sugar Beet Cyst Nematode: In Imperial Valley
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis, I. J. Thomason, Peter Yu, Ben Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil treatment with twenty gallons of D-D or Telone in combination with 40 pounds of Temik 10G per acre gave 28 tons of sugar beet root yield per acre versus 7 tons from non-treated plots. The cost of applied materials and gross return per acre was approximately $90 and $1064, respectively.
Impact of Air Pollution on the Growth of Ponde Rosa Pine
by Joe R. McBride, Vaiva P. Semion, Paul R. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Air pollution poses a serious threat to the coniferous forests of California. Symptoms of air pollution damage to coniferous species have been observed in forests located north and east of the Los Angeles basin, east of major cities in the Central Valley, and east of San Diego. Damage is especially severe in the San Bernardino Mountains east of Los Angeles.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Air pollution poses a serious threat to the coniferous forests of California. Symptoms of air pollution damage to coniferous species have been observed in forests located north and east of the Los Angeles basin, east of major cities in the Central Valley, and east of San Diego. Damage is especially severe in the San Bernardino Mountains east of Los Angeles.
Filth Fly Sources in Decaying Melon Fields: In Southern California's Low Deserts
by E. F. Legner, G. S. Olton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cull cantaloupes and watermelons are a major breeding habitat for several filth flies in southern Californiu's lower desert valleys, with the common house fly, Musca domestica, being predominant. Biological control alone is not satisfactory, but its integration with cultural methods, such as destruction of breeding habitats by mechanical breakage of cull melons, could offer a practical solution to the fly problem.
Prediction of the First Harvesting Date of Creole Onions: In the Palo Verde Valley of California
by Charles C. Cheyney, K. N. Paulson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting onions for dehydration in California starts in the Palo Verde and Imperial Valleys in May or June, proceeds north, and terminates in the Tule Lake area in October or November. Consequently, processing plants do not operate from November to May. To keep costs at a minimum, it is important not to prepare and staff the plants before the onions will be available to dehydrate. Thus, the problem is to predict far enough in advance the time onions will be available, so that employees and onions can arrive at the processing plant at the same time.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting onions for dehydration in California starts in the Palo Verde and Imperial Valleys in May or June, proceeds north, and terminates in the Tule Lake area in October or November. Consequently, processing plants do not operate from November to May. To keep costs at a minimum, it is important not to prepare and staff the plants before the onions will be available to dehydrate. Thus, the problem is to predict far enough in advance the time onions will be available, so that employees and onions can arrive at the processing plant at the same time.
Multiple Insemination of Turkey Hens
by F. X. Ogasawara, J. P Schroeder, L. S. Mercia
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dilution of turkey semen to make it more fluid and easier to work with is practiced in some segments of the turkey breeding industry since fertility is not adversely affected and, in some cases, is enhanced. Dilution of semen also offers an economic advantage. The number of toms in a breeding flock, costing $30 each for the season, can be decreased. The potential savings to California turkey breeders from this reduction would amount to approximately $1.5 million for the turkey breeding season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dilution of turkey semen to make it more fluid and easier to work with is practiced in some segments of the turkey breeding industry since fertility is not adversely affected and, in some cases, is enhanced. Dilution of semen also offers an economic advantage. The number of toms in a breeding flock, costing $30 each for the season, can be decreased. The potential savings to California turkey breeders from this reduction would amount to approximately $1.5 million for the turkey breeding season.
A Comparison of Two Pruning Methods: On mature lemon trees
by R. M. Burns, S. B. Boswell, S. F. Wear, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years, most lemon trees have been regularly pruned as a general practice. The reasons for pruning have included: ease of harvest and cultural operations, stimulation of fruit wood, andimprovement of fruit size and quality.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years, most lemon trees have been regularly pruned as a general practice. The reasons for pruning have included: ease of harvest and cultural operations, stimulation of fruit wood, andimprovement of fruit size and quality.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

The Perfective Society
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.12

Cover:  Emperor penguins at Cope Crozier.
December 1975
Volume 29, Number 12

Research articles

Comparative biochemistry of Antarctic proteins
by Robert E. Feeney, David T. Osuga
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The UCD team of agricultural scientists has been studying the proteins of Antarctic species for 11 years, starting in 1964. During the first seven years, trips were made each year to Antarctica to study and obtain specimens from penguins and cold-adapted fishes.
The UCD team of agricultural scientists has been studying the proteins of Antarctic species for 11 years, starting in 1964. During the first seven years, trips were made each year to Antarctica to study and obtain specimens from penguins and cold-adapted fishes.
Chemical Control of the Sugar Beet Cyst Nematode: In Imperial Valley
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis, I. J. Thomason, Peter Yu, Ben Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil treatment with twenty gallons of D-D or Telone in combination with 40 pounds of Temik 10G per acre gave 28 tons of sugar beet root yield per acre versus 7 tons from non-treated plots. The cost of applied materials and gross return per acre was approximately $90 and $1064, respectively.
Impact of Air Pollution on the Growth of Ponde Rosa Pine
by Joe R. McBride, Vaiva P. Semion, Paul R. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Air pollution poses a serious threat to the coniferous forests of California. Symptoms of air pollution damage to coniferous species have been observed in forests located north and east of the Los Angeles basin, east of major cities in the Central Valley, and east of San Diego. Damage is especially severe in the San Bernardino Mountains east of Los Angeles.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Air pollution poses a serious threat to the coniferous forests of California. Symptoms of air pollution damage to coniferous species have been observed in forests located north and east of the Los Angeles basin, east of major cities in the Central Valley, and east of San Diego. Damage is especially severe in the San Bernardino Mountains east of Los Angeles.
Filth Fly Sources in Decaying Melon Fields: In Southern California's Low Deserts
by E. F. Legner, G. S. Olton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cull cantaloupes and watermelons are a major breeding habitat for several filth flies in southern Californiu's lower desert valleys, with the common house fly, Musca domestica, being predominant. Biological control alone is not satisfactory, but its integration with cultural methods, such as destruction of breeding habitats by mechanical breakage of cull melons, could offer a practical solution to the fly problem.
Prediction of the First Harvesting Date of Creole Onions: In the Palo Verde Valley of California
by Charles C. Cheyney, K. N. Paulson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting onions for dehydration in California starts in the Palo Verde and Imperial Valleys in May or June, proceeds north, and terminates in the Tule Lake area in October or November. Consequently, processing plants do not operate from November to May. To keep costs at a minimum, it is important not to prepare and staff the plants before the onions will be available to dehydrate. Thus, the problem is to predict far enough in advance the time onions will be available, so that employees and onions can arrive at the processing plant at the same time.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Harvesting onions for dehydration in California starts in the Palo Verde and Imperial Valleys in May or June, proceeds north, and terminates in the Tule Lake area in October or November. Consequently, processing plants do not operate from November to May. To keep costs at a minimum, it is important not to prepare and staff the plants before the onions will be available to dehydrate. Thus, the problem is to predict far enough in advance the time onions will be available, so that employees and onions can arrive at the processing plant at the same time.
Multiple Insemination of Turkey Hens
by F. X. Ogasawara, J. P Schroeder, L. S. Mercia
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dilution of turkey semen to make it more fluid and easier to work with is practiced in some segments of the turkey breeding industry since fertility is not adversely affected and, in some cases, is enhanced. Dilution of semen also offers an economic advantage. The number of toms in a breeding flock, costing $30 each for the season, can be decreased. The potential savings to California turkey breeders from this reduction would amount to approximately $1.5 million for the turkey breeding season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dilution of turkey semen to make it more fluid and easier to work with is practiced in some segments of the turkey breeding industry since fertility is not adversely affected and, in some cases, is enhanced. Dilution of semen also offers an economic advantage. The number of toms in a breeding flock, costing $30 each for the season, can be decreased. The potential savings to California turkey breeders from this reduction would amount to approximately $1.5 million for the turkey breeding season.
A Comparison of Two Pruning Methods: On mature lemon trees
by R. M. Burns, S. B. Boswell, S. F. Wear, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years, most lemon trees have been regularly pruned as a general practice. The reasons for pruning have included: ease of harvest and cultural operations, stimulation of fruit wood, andimprovement of fruit size and quality.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years, most lemon trees have been regularly pruned as a general practice. The reasons for pruning have included: ease of harvest and cultural operations, stimulation of fruit wood, andimprovement of fruit size and quality.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

The Perfective Society
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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