California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.11

Cover:  Top shows boom-shaker in pistachio nut orchard. Bottom shows nuts harvested by boom-shaking (left) and (right) by handstripping those remaining after shaking.
November 1975
Volume 29, Number 11

Research articles

Mosquito and chironomid midge control by planaria
by R.F. Legner, H.S. Yu, R.A. Medved, M.E. Badgley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Planaria offer practical substitutes to chemicals for controlling mosquites and chironomid midges in some aquatic pest management systems. Unlike chemical larvicides, planaria produce a sustained high level of control that endures through the entire season without pest quests.
Separation of Blank Pistachio Nuts by Mechanical Harvesting
by J. C. Crane, J. J. Dunning
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The pistachio nut tree (Pistacia Vera L.), which is native to the Mid-East and Central Asia, was introduced into California in the :arly part of this century. Commercial plantings were few and small inti1 the last several years, but -here are now over 1,000 acres in xoduction and about 23,000 acres will come into bearing in the next l to 4 years. The majority of the dantings are in Kern and Kings, ounties, with some over 2,000 icres in size.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The pistachio nut tree (Pistacia Vera L.), which is native to the Mid-East and Central Asia, was introduced into California in the :arly part of this century. Commercial plantings were few and small inti1 the last several years, but -here are now over 1,000 acres in xoduction and about 23,000 acres will come into bearing in the next l to 4 years. The majority of the dantings are in Kern and Kings, ounties, with some over 2,000 icres in size.
Biological Aquatic Weed Control by Fish in the Lower Sonoran Desert of California
by E. F. Legner, W. J. Hauser, T. W. Fisher, R. A. Meiived
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Use of fish for biological aquatic weed control is becoming widespread in the irrigation system and recreational lakes of the lower Sonoran Desert of California. Two African species, Tilapia zillii and T. mossambica are currently employed. The expansion of this program with development of better mass production techniques and the addition of one or two other fish species, is expected to significantly reduce environmental pollution through reduction in use of herbicides and mechanical disruptions, and to favor development of gome-fish such as large-mouth bass.
Restricted feeding of Leghorn layers
by Milo H. Swanson, Gary W. Johnston
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A number of variables govern the amount of feed consumed daily by full-fed laying hens. Most important are body weight, ambient temperature, energy level of the feed, and egg production rate. A change in any one of these variables causes a compensatory change in feed intake as the birds attempt to adjust energy consumption to energy needs. But chickens are not all equally proficient in making that adjustment.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A number of variables govern the amount of feed consumed daily by full-fed laying hens. Most important are body weight, ambient temperature, energy level of the feed, and egg production rate. A change in any one of these variables causes a compensatory change in feed intake as the birds attempt to adjust energy consumption to energy needs. But chickens are not all equally proficient in making that adjustment.
Effect of Water Quality and Irrigation Frequency on Farm Income: In the Imperial Valley
by Jay Noel, Charles V. Moore, Frank Robinson, J. H. Snyder
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deteriorating water quality is a problem in many California agricultural areas. Effects of increased salts on crop yields, farm income, and future soil deterioration are of great concern to agriculturalists.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deteriorating water quality is a problem in many California agricultural areas. Effects of increased salts on crop yields, farm income, and future soil deterioration are of great concern to agriculturalists.
Irrigating for maximum alfalfa seed yield
by R. W. Hagemann, L. S. Willardson, A. W. Marsh, C. F. Ehlig
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This experiment indicates that a high yield of alfalfa seed, can be obtained in the Imperial Valley if water management and insects are properly controlled. Irrigations guided by tensiometer at the 50-centibar level during seed production gave the best yield in 2 years of testing. Irrigation control was obtained by using surface drip irrigation.

News and opinion

What is an: Agricultural Scientist?
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.11

Cover:  Top shows boom-shaker in pistachio nut orchard. Bottom shows nuts harvested by boom-shaking (left) and (right) by handstripping those remaining after shaking.
November 1975
Volume 29, Number 11

Research articles

Mosquito and chironomid midge control by planaria
by R.F. Legner, H.S. Yu, R.A. Medved, M.E. Badgley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Planaria offer practical substitutes to chemicals for controlling mosquites and chironomid midges in some aquatic pest management systems. Unlike chemical larvicides, planaria produce a sustained high level of control that endures through the entire season without pest quests.
Separation of Blank Pistachio Nuts by Mechanical Harvesting
by J. C. Crane, J. J. Dunning
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The pistachio nut tree (Pistacia Vera L.), which is native to the Mid-East and Central Asia, was introduced into California in the :arly part of this century. Commercial plantings were few and small inti1 the last several years, but -here are now over 1,000 acres in xoduction and about 23,000 acres will come into bearing in the next l to 4 years. The majority of the dantings are in Kern and Kings, ounties, with some over 2,000 icres in size.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The pistachio nut tree (Pistacia Vera L.), which is native to the Mid-East and Central Asia, was introduced into California in the :arly part of this century. Commercial plantings were few and small inti1 the last several years, but -here are now over 1,000 acres in xoduction and about 23,000 acres will come into bearing in the next l to 4 years. The majority of the dantings are in Kern and Kings, ounties, with some over 2,000 icres in size.
Biological Aquatic Weed Control by Fish in the Lower Sonoran Desert of California
by E. F. Legner, W. J. Hauser, T. W. Fisher, R. A. Meiived
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Use of fish for biological aquatic weed control is becoming widespread in the irrigation system and recreational lakes of the lower Sonoran Desert of California. Two African species, Tilapia zillii and T. mossambica are currently employed. The expansion of this program with development of better mass production techniques and the addition of one or two other fish species, is expected to significantly reduce environmental pollution through reduction in use of herbicides and mechanical disruptions, and to favor development of gome-fish such as large-mouth bass.
Restricted feeding of Leghorn layers
by Milo H. Swanson, Gary W. Johnston
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A number of variables govern the amount of feed consumed daily by full-fed laying hens. Most important are body weight, ambient temperature, energy level of the feed, and egg production rate. A change in any one of these variables causes a compensatory change in feed intake as the birds attempt to adjust energy consumption to energy needs. But chickens are not all equally proficient in making that adjustment.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A number of variables govern the amount of feed consumed daily by full-fed laying hens. Most important are body weight, ambient temperature, energy level of the feed, and egg production rate. A change in any one of these variables causes a compensatory change in feed intake as the birds attempt to adjust energy consumption to energy needs. But chickens are not all equally proficient in making that adjustment.
Effect of Water Quality and Irrigation Frequency on Farm Income: In the Imperial Valley
by Jay Noel, Charles V. Moore, Frank Robinson, J. H. Snyder
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deteriorating water quality is a problem in many California agricultural areas. Effects of increased salts on crop yields, farm income, and future soil deterioration are of great concern to agriculturalists.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deteriorating water quality is a problem in many California agricultural areas. Effects of increased salts on crop yields, farm income, and future soil deterioration are of great concern to agriculturalists.
Irrigating for maximum alfalfa seed yield
by R. W. Hagemann, L. S. Willardson, A. W. Marsh, C. F. Ehlig
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
This experiment indicates that a high yield of alfalfa seed, can be obtained in the Imperial Valley if water management and insects are properly controlled. Irrigations guided by tensiometer at the 50-centibar level during seed production gave the best yield in 2 years of testing. Irrigation control was obtained by using surface drip irrigation.

News and opinion

What is an: Agricultural Scientist?
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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