California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.10

Cover:  Feeding time at the Norman Feedlot, San Jacinto. See “Time of Processing Effects on Feedlot Calves,” - Photo by Max Clover.
October 1975
Volume 29, Number 10

Research articles

How to Produce: 20 Pounds of Beef for less than one Dollar
by Monte Bell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Implanting suckling steer calves with 12 or 15 mg. DES (not to be implanted within 120 days of slaughter) and heifer calves with 36 mg. RAL (not to be implanted within 65 days of slaughter) at marking and branding time is practical and clearly economical. Implanting costs less than $1.00 and will result in 10 to 30 additional pounds per calf at weaning without adversely affecting slaughter cattle given the usual growth stimulants during the finishing period. DES and RAL are available from veterinary product suppliers.
Time of Processing Effects on: Feedlot Calves
by D. G. Addis, J. R. Dunbar, G. P. Lofgreen, J. G. Clark, G. L. Crenshaw, C. Adams, F. D. Cress
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Delayed processing of calves following their shipment from other states to California for growing resulted in a higher cost per pound weight gain and poorer performance than processing calves at their point of origin or immediately upon their arrival. In two of the three studies, conducted at the University of California Imperial Valley Field Station, calves processed before shipment showed the best response at the lowest cost.
Preharvest Antitranspirant Spray on Cherries: Part 1. effect on fruit size
by K. Uriu, D. Davenport, R. M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Antitranspirants (wax emulsions) have been evaluated for several years as orchard sprays to increase fruit size by reducing water stress in the tree. In earlier work with cherries (California Agriculture, August 1972) antitranspirant (AT) spray applied shortly before harvest substantially increased fruit size. However, more information was needed on the best spray concentration and timing to influence fruit size, yield, and soluble solids content. Further, no definitive tests had been conducted to evaluate the postharvest effects on fruit caused by preharvest AT application to the trees.The tests reported here indicate that AT spray has beneficial effects on fruit size and on postharvest characteristics of the cherry fruit.
Preharvest Antitranspirant Spray on Cherries: Part 2. postharvest fruit benefits
by F. G. Mitchell, G. Mayer, K. Uriu, D. C. Davenport
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests were conducted during the 1973 and 1974 seasons to evaluate possible beneficial and detrimental effects of AT on postharvest handling of the cherry fruit. Included in these postharvest evaluations were effects of the AT spray on water loss from the fruit, subsequent fruit shrivel and stem browning, changes in respiratory pattern of the fruit, appearance, and any unusual deterioration pattern.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests were conducted during the 1973 and 1974 seasons to evaluate possible beneficial and detrimental effects of AT on postharvest handling of the cherry fruit. Included in these postharvest evaluations were effects of the AT spray on water loss from the fruit, subsequent fruit shrivel and stem browning, changes in respiratory pattern of the fruit, appearance, and any unusual deterioration pattern.
The Performance of Independent Pest Management Consultants: In San Joaquin Cotton and Citrus
by D. C. Hall, R. B. Norgaard, P. K. True
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton and citrus growers, the two largest users of pesticides in the United States, can reduce the amount of pesticides used on their crops and increase their returns per acre. This was the conclusion of a study undertaken through the Giannini Foundation of Agricultura1 Economics, University of California, Berkeley. The research, based on interviews with 42 cotton and 39 citrus growers in the San Joaquin Valley, suggests that growers can realize these gains by following the advice of independent pest management consultants. Research is continuing in order to measure the profitability of consultant programs to the growers and to learn how growers decide to use a consultant's services.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton and citrus growers, the two largest users of pesticides in the United States, can reduce the amount of pesticides used on their crops and increase their returns per acre. This was the conclusion of a study undertaken through the Giannini Foundation of Agricultura1 Economics, University of California, Berkeley. The research, based on interviews with 42 cotton and 39 citrus growers in the San Joaquin Valley, suggests that growers can realize these gains by following the advice of independent pest management consultants. Research is continuing in order to measure the profitability of consultant programs to the growers and to learn how growers decide to use a consultant's services.

News and Opinion

Food Research: Is not Just Production Research
by J. B Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 29, No.10

Cover:  Feeding time at the Norman Feedlot, San Jacinto. See “Time of Processing Effects on Feedlot Calves,” - Photo by Max Clover.
October 1975
Volume 29, Number 10

Research articles

How to Produce: 20 Pounds of Beef for less than one Dollar
by Monte Bell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Implanting suckling steer calves with 12 or 15 mg. DES (not to be implanted within 120 days of slaughter) and heifer calves with 36 mg. RAL (not to be implanted within 65 days of slaughter) at marking and branding time is practical and clearly economical. Implanting costs less than $1.00 and will result in 10 to 30 additional pounds per calf at weaning without adversely affecting slaughter cattle given the usual growth stimulants during the finishing period. DES and RAL are available from veterinary product suppliers.
Time of Processing Effects on: Feedlot Calves
by D. G. Addis, J. R. Dunbar, G. P. Lofgreen, J. G. Clark, G. L. Crenshaw, C. Adams, F. D. Cress
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Delayed processing of calves following their shipment from other states to California for growing resulted in a higher cost per pound weight gain and poorer performance than processing calves at their point of origin or immediately upon their arrival. In two of the three studies, conducted at the University of California Imperial Valley Field Station, calves processed before shipment showed the best response at the lowest cost.
Preharvest Antitranspirant Spray on Cherries: Part 1. effect on fruit size
by K. Uriu, D. Davenport, R. M. Hagan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Antitranspirants (wax emulsions) have been evaluated for several years as orchard sprays to increase fruit size by reducing water stress in the tree. In earlier work with cherries (California Agriculture, August 1972) antitranspirant (AT) spray applied shortly before harvest substantially increased fruit size. However, more information was needed on the best spray concentration and timing to influence fruit size, yield, and soluble solids content. Further, no definitive tests had been conducted to evaluate the postharvest effects on fruit caused by preharvest AT application to the trees.The tests reported here indicate that AT spray has beneficial effects on fruit size and on postharvest characteristics of the cherry fruit.
Preharvest Antitranspirant Spray on Cherries: Part 2. postharvest fruit benefits
by F. G. Mitchell, G. Mayer, K. Uriu, D. C. Davenport
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests were conducted during the 1973 and 1974 seasons to evaluate possible beneficial and detrimental effects of AT on postharvest handling of the cherry fruit. Included in these postharvest evaluations were effects of the AT spray on water loss from the fruit, subsequent fruit shrivel and stem browning, changes in respiratory pattern of the fruit, appearance, and any unusual deterioration pattern.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests were conducted during the 1973 and 1974 seasons to evaluate possible beneficial and detrimental effects of AT on postharvest handling of the cherry fruit. Included in these postharvest evaluations were effects of the AT spray on water loss from the fruit, subsequent fruit shrivel and stem browning, changes in respiratory pattern of the fruit, appearance, and any unusual deterioration pattern.
The Performance of Independent Pest Management Consultants: In San Joaquin Cotton and Citrus
by D. C. Hall, R. B. Norgaard, P. K. True
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton and citrus growers, the two largest users of pesticides in the United States, can reduce the amount of pesticides used on their crops and increase their returns per acre. This was the conclusion of a study undertaken through the Giannini Foundation of Agricultura1 Economics, University of California, Berkeley. The research, based on interviews with 42 cotton and 39 citrus growers in the San Joaquin Valley, suggests that growers can realize these gains by following the advice of independent pest management consultants. Research is continuing in order to measure the profitability of consultant programs to the growers and to learn how growers decide to use a consultant's services.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cotton and citrus growers, the two largest users of pesticides in the United States, can reduce the amount of pesticides used on their crops and increase their returns per acre. This was the conclusion of a study undertaken through the Giannini Foundation of Agricultura1 Economics, University of California, Berkeley. The research, based on interviews with 42 cotton and 39 citrus growers in the San Joaquin Valley, suggests that growers can realize these gains by following the advice of independent pest management consultants. Research is continuing in order to measure the profitability of consultant programs to the growers and to learn how growers decide to use a consultant's services.

News and Opinion

Food Research: Is not Just Production Research
by J. B Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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