California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.3

Testing maturity of table grapes
March 1948
Volume 2, Number 3

Research articles

Irrigation: During a rainfall-deficient year
by F. J. Veihmeyer, A. H. Hendrickson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Many farmers are concerned about the moisture needs of their crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Many farmers are concerned about the moisture needs of their crops.
Stubble mulch: As a protective measure against erosion of grainland in California
by Lloyd N. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stubble mulch, as used in this article—except in connection with wind erosion—concerns land steep enough to erode, which usually is steeper than a 2% or a 3% incline.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stubble mulch, as used in this article—except in connection with wind erosion—concerns land steep enough to erode, which usually is steeper than a 2% or a 3% incline.
Table grapes: Relation of heat summation to time of maturing and palatability
by A. J. Winkler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Determining the maturity of the table grape accurately without the eating has been, and still is, a problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Determining the maturity of the table grape accurately without the eating has been, and still is, a problem.
Mealybugs on pears: Biological control by utilizing natural enemies
by Richard L. Doutt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mealybugs usually are susceptible to biological control.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mealybugs usually are susceptible to biological control.
Commercialized farming: Requires better management
by Arthur Shultis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Increased application of science and equipment to agriculture has resulted in increased control over biologic and climatic yield factors.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Increased application of science and equipment to agriculture has resulted in increased control over biologic and climatic yield factors.
Weeds are costly: Represent about half of the total cultivation expenses of crop
by C. B. Hutchison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Extract from an address before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2,1948.
Extract from an address before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2,1948.
Selective weed killers: Synthetic compounds important development in agriculture
by W. W. Robbins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Extract from a talk before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2, 1948.
Extract from a talk before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2, 1948.
Punjab flax: For seed production in Imperial Valley
by L. G. Goar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately 50% of the Punjab flaxseed in California is produced in Imperial Valley. The cash value of this crop in Imperial Valley in 1947 was approximately $11,424,000.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately 50% of the Punjab flaxseed in California is produced in Imperial Valley. The cash value of this crop in Imperial Valley in 1947 was approximately $11,424,000.
Suction harvester: Picks up almonds from ground at rate of about four acres a day
by R. R. Parks, J. P. Fairbank
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The newest mechanical help for the almond grower in California is a suction-harvester which picks up the nuts from the ground.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The newest mechanical help for the almond grower in California is a suction-harvester which picks up the nuts from the ground.
Quick decline: Experiments seek control of virus-caused disease of orange trees
by L. D. Batchelor, J. M. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A brief report of a joint discussion before the California Fruit Growers Exchange meeting in Los Angeles.
A brief report of a joint discussion before the California Fruit Growers Exchange meeting in Los Angeles.
Ash bug control: Timing of application of insecticide important
by Robert L. Usinger
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important insect enemies of the native Oregon Ash, and the commonly planted Arizona Ash, in California are plant bugs of the genus Neoborus and lace bugs of the genus Leptoypha.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important insect enemies of the native Oregon Ash, and the commonly planted Arizona Ash, in California are plant bugs of the genus Neoborus and lace bugs of the genus Leptoypha.
Fly strike in sheep: Quick-acting contact poisons tested
by J. R. Douglas, J. F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fly strike has always been a serious problem in the north coast area of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fly strike has always been a serious problem in the north coast area of California.
New variety of canning tomato: Recommended for trial where Verticillium wilt is serious
by J. W. Lesley, John T. Middleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tomatoes grown in california are likely to become affected with either Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. lycopersici, or Verticillium wilt, caufeed by Verticillium albo-atrum.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tomatoes grown in california are likely to become affected with either Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. lycopersici, or Verticillium wilt, caufeed by Verticillium albo-atrum.

General Information

Farm real estate: Situation in California reviewed
by David Weeks, Charles H. West
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.3

Testing maturity of table grapes
March 1948
Volume 2, Number 3

Research articles

Irrigation: During a rainfall-deficient year
by F. J. Veihmeyer, A. H. Hendrickson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Many farmers are concerned about the moisture needs of their crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Many farmers are concerned about the moisture needs of their crops.
Stubble mulch: As a protective measure against erosion of grainland in California
by Lloyd N. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stubble mulch, as used in this article—except in connection with wind erosion—concerns land steep enough to erode, which usually is steeper than a 2% or a 3% incline.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Stubble mulch, as used in this article—except in connection with wind erosion—concerns land steep enough to erode, which usually is steeper than a 2% or a 3% incline.
Table grapes: Relation of heat summation to time of maturing and palatability
by A. J. Winkler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Determining the maturity of the table grape accurately without the eating has been, and still is, a problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Determining the maturity of the table grape accurately without the eating has been, and still is, a problem.
Mealybugs on pears: Biological control by utilizing natural enemies
by Richard L. Doutt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mealybugs usually are susceptible to biological control.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Mealybugs usually are susceptible to biological control.
Commercialized farming: Requires better management
by Arthur Shultis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Increased application of science and equipment to agriculture has resulted in increased control over biologic and climatic yield factors.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Increased application of science and equipment to agriculture has resulted in increased control over biologic and climatic yield factors.
Weeds are costly: Represent about half of the total cultivation expenses of crop
by C. B. Hutchison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Extract from an address before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2,1948.
Extract from an address before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2,1948.
Selective weed killers: Synthetic compounds important development in agriculture
by W. W. Robbins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Extract from a talk before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2, 1948.
Extract from a talk before the Tenth Annual Weed Control Conference, in Sacramento, February 2, 1948.
Punjab flax: For seed production in Imperial Valley
by L. G. Goar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately 50% of the Punjab flaxseed in California is produced in Imperial Valley. The cash value of this crop in Imperial Valley in 1947 was approximately $11,424,000.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately 50% of the Punjab flaxseed in California is produced in Imperial Valley. The cash value of this crop in Imperial Valley in 1947 was approximately $11,424,000.
Suction harvester: Picks up almonds from ground at rate of about four acres a day
by R. R. Parks, J. P. Fairbank
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The newest mechanical help for the almond grower in California is a suction-harvester which picks up the nuts from the ground.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The newest mechanical help for the almond grower in California is a suction-harvester which picks up the nuts from the ground.
Quick decline: Experiments seek control of virus-caused disease of orange trees
by L. D. Batchelor, J. M. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A brief report of a joint discussion before the California Fruit Growers Exchange meeting in Los Angeles.
A brief report of a joint discussion before the California Fruit Growers Exchange meeting in Los Angeles.
Ash bug control: Timing of application of insecticide important
by Robert L. Usinger
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important insect enemies of the native Oregon Ash, and the commonly planted Arizona Ash, in California are plant bugs of the genus Neoborus and lace bugs of the genus Leptoypha.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The most important insect enemies of the native Oregon Ash, and the commonly planted Arizona Ash, in California are plant bugs of the genus Neoborus and lace bugs of the genus Leptoypha.
Fly strike in sheep: Quick-acting contact poisons tested
by J. R. Douglas, J. F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fly strike has always been a serious problem in the north coast area of California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Fly strike has always been a serious problem in the north coast area of California.
New variety of canning tomato: Recommended for trial where Verticillium wilt is serious
by J. W. Lesley, John T. Middleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tomatoes grown in california are likely to become affected with either Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. lycopersici, or Verticillium wilt, caufeed by Verticillium albo-atrum.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Tomatoes grown in california are likely to become affected with either Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. lycopersici, or Verticillium wilt, caufeed by Verticillium albo-atrum.

General Information

Farm real estate: Situation in California reviewed
by David Weeks, Charles H. West
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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