California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.2

Parathion for woolly apple aphid
February 1948
Volume 2, Number 2

Research articles

Costs of almond production: In California analyzed in recently completed study
by R. L. Adams, A. D. Reed
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The value of the almond crop, and the basis of returns to growers—averaged for 1943, 1944, and 1945—place the almond seventh, on the list of all California deciduous tree fruits and nuts.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The value of the almond crop, and the basis of returns to growers—averaged for 1943, 1944, and 1945—place the almond seventh, on the list of all California deciduous tree fruits and nuts.
Parathion, new insecticide: Effective against mites and woolly apple aphid
by Arthur D. Borden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new organic compound—officially named Parathion by the United States government, and known chemically as O, O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl-thiophosphate and to research field men as 3422—was tested last season on deciduous fruit trees with excellent success.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new organic compound—officially named Parathion by the United States government, and known chemically as O, O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl-thiophosphate and to research field men as 3422—was tested last season on deciduous fruit trees with excellent success.
Fungus flora species: In California citrus soils
by J. P. Martin, Harrietann Joseph
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is more difficult to grow good trees on old citrus soil than on soil which has never been cropped to citrus.
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is more difficult to grow good trees on old citrus soil than on soil which has never been cropped to citrus.
Seedless Calimyrna figs: Produced without caprifigs by spraying with growth regulators
by Julian C. Crane, Rene Blondeau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seedless Calimyrna figs may be produced without the use of male or caprifigs, by spraying the trees with a solution of indolebutyric acid at caprification—pollination—time.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seedless Calimyrna figs may be produced without the use of male or caprifigs, by spraying the trees with a solution of indolebutyric acid at caprification—pollination—time.
Wasp aids oriental fruit moth control
by Harry S. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The infiltration of the Oriental fruit moth into California was discovered in the peach orchards of Orange County in 1942.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The infiltration of the Oriental fruit moth into California was discovered in the peach orchards of Orange County in 1942.
The mealybug problem: On newly grafted avocado trees
by Walter Ebeling, Roy J. Pence
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: On grafted avocado trees, long-tailed mealybugs are an important problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: On grafted avocado trees, long-tailed mealybugs are an important problem.
Value of urea tested: As a partial substitute for protein in range supplemental feeding
by H. R. Guilbert, G. H. Hart, K. A. Wagnon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A gain in weight of one pound daily, from weaning until the next green forage season, is a desirable-objective if calves are to be sold as yearling feeders, or are to be carried over for grass finish at two years of age.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A gain in weight of one pound daily, from weaning until the next green forage season, is a desirable-objective if calves are to be sold as yearling feeders, or are to be carried over for grass finish at two years of age.
Citrus thrips control with DDT: Investigated in two Coachella Valley groves
by W. H. Ewart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results obtained in the Coachella Valley with DDT for the control of citrus thrips indicated that DDT gave poorer control than standard nicotine-sugar sprays.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results obtained in the Coachella Valley with DDT for the control of citrus thrips indicated that DDT gave poorer control than standard nicotine-sugar sprays.
Oriental fruit moth problem: In central California
by Leslie M. Smith, Francis M. Summers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Oriental fruit moth does its greatest damage to the peach, although other deciduous fruits, such as quince, nectarine, apricot, plum, cherry, apple, pear, and almond, are also attacked.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Oriental fruit moth does its greatest damage to the peach, although other deciduous fruits, such as quince, nectarine, apricot, plum, cherry, apple, pear, and almond, are also attacked.
Soil analysis: Not an answer, merely a tool in the study of soil problems
by Warren R. Schoonover, J. C. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil analysis almost never furnishes a direct answer to a California soil problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil analysis almost never furnishes a direct answer to a California soil problem.
Soil sampler: Power-operated and mobile, new device speeds up soil surveying
by Rodney J. Arkley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A power-operated soil sampler now does the drudgery in soil surveying—the mechanical job of extracting soil samples which are required by the thousands for an adequate map of a survey area.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A power-operated soil sampler now does the drudgery in soil surveying—the mechanical job of extracting soil samples which are required by the thousands for an adequate map of a survey area.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.2

Parathion for woolly apple aphid
February 1948
Volume 2, Number 2

Research articles

Costs of almond production: In California analyzed in recently completed study
by R. L. Adams, A. D. Reed
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The value of the almond crop, and the basis of returns to growers—averaged for 1943, 1944, and 1945—place the almond seventh, on the list of all California deciduous tree fruits and nuts.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The value of the almond crop, and the basis of returns to growers—averaged for 1943, 1944, and 1945—place the almond seventh, on the list of all California deciduous tree fruits and nuts.
Parathion, new insecticide: Effective against mites and woolly apple aphid
by Arthur D. Borden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new organic compound—officially named Parathion by the United States government, and known chemically as O, O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl-thiophosphate and to research field men as 3422—was tested last season on deciduous fruit trees with excellent success.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A new organic compound—officially named Parathion by the United States government, and known chemically as O, O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl-thiophosphate and to research field men as 3422—was tested last season on deciduous fruit trees with excellent success.
Fungus flora species: In California citrus soils
by J. P. Martin, Harrietann Joseph
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is more difficult to grow good trees on old citrus soil than on soil which has never been cropped to citrus.
Not available – first paragraph follows: It is more difficult to grow good trees on old citrus soil than on soil which has never been cropped to citrus.
Seedless Calimyrna figs: Produced without caprifigs by spraying with growth regulators
by Julian C. Crane, Rene Blondeau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seedless Calimyrna figs may be produced without the use of male or caprifigs, by spraying the trees with a solution of indolebutyric acid at caprification—pollination—time.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Seedless Calimyrna figs may be produced without the use of male or caprifigs, by spraying the trees with a solution of indolebutyric acid at caprification—pollination—time.
Wasp aids oriental fruit moth control
by Harry S. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The infiltration of the Oriental fruit moth into California was discovered in the peach orchards of Orange County in 1942.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The infiltration of the Oriental fruit moth into California was discovered in the peach orchards of Orange County in 1942.
The mealybug problem: On newly grafted avocado trees
by Walter Ebeling, Roy J. Pence
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: On grafted avocado trees, long-tailed mealybugs are an important problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: On grafted avocado trees, long-tailed mealybugs are an important problem.
Value of urea tested: As a partial substitute for protein in range supplemental feeding
by H. R. Guilbert, G. H. Hart, K. A. Wagnon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A gain in weight of one pound daily, from weaning until the next green forage season, is a desirable-objective if calves are to be sold as yearling feeders, or are to be carried over for grass finish at two years of age.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A gain in weight of one pound daily, from weaning until the next green forage season, is a desirable-objective if calves are to be sold as yearling feeders, or are to be carried over for grass finish at two years of age.
Citrus thrips control with DDT: Investigated in two Coachella Valley groves
by W. H. Ewart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results obtained in the Coachella Valley with DDT for the control of citrus thrips indicated that DDT gave poorer control than standard nicotine-sugar sprays.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Results obtained in the Coachella Valley with DDT for the control of citrus thrips indicated that DDT gave poorer control than standard nicotine-sugar sprays.
Oriental fruit moth problem: In central California
by Leslie M. Smith, Francis M. Summers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Oriental fruit moth does its greatest damage to the peach, although other deciduous fruits, such as quince, nectarine, apricot, plum, cherry, apple, pear, and almond, are also attacked.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Oriental fruit moth does its greatest damage to the peach, although other deciduous fruits, such as quince, nectarine, apricot, plum, cherry, apple, pear, and almond, are also attacked.
Soil analysis: Not an answer, merely a tool in the study of soil problems
by Warren R. Schoonover, J. C. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil analysis almost never furnishes a direct answer to a California soil problem.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Soil analysis almost never furnishes a direct answer to a California soil problem.
Soil sampler: Power-operated and mobile, new device speeds up soil surveying
by Rodney J. Arkley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A power-operated soil sampler now does the drudgery in soil surveying—the mechanical job of extracting soil samples which are required by the thousands for an adequate map of a survey area.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A power-operated soil sampler now does the drudgery in soil surveying—the mechanical job of extracting soil samples which are required by the thousands for an adequate map of a survey area.

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