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California Agriculture, Vol. 28, No.5

Cover:  A 24-ft module builder for seed cotton in operation in the Sun Joaquin Valley. The hydraulically-powered compacter cylinder and support carriage are shown near the rear. Raised module builder being pulled off the completed module in lower photo.
May 1974
Volume 28, Number 5

Research articles

Evaluation of man-made fog for frost protection of citrus in California
by R. F. Brewer, R. M. Burns, K. W. Opitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field evaluations of two fogging systems designed and marketed for frost protection of citrus in California indicated that, under ideal conditions, some protection to the area under the fog could be obtained. However, the major limitations still remaining with use of fog for frost protection include: producing enough fog particles of an effective size, and holding the fog in the area to be protected.
Field evaluations of two fogging systems designed and marketed for frost protection of citrus in California indicated that, under ideal conditions, some protection to the area under the fog could be obtained. However, the major limitations still remaining with use of fog for frost protection include: producing enough fog particles of an effective size, and holding the fog in the area to be protected.
The module system for storing and handling seed cotton
by R. A. Kepner, R. G. Curley, M. Hoover, L. K. Stromberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The study reported here indicates that total picker-to-gin costs per bale can be significantly lower with the module system than with the conventional trailer system or ricking. If a grower already has trailers, the module system requires considerably more additional investment in equipment than the ricking system. But modules can be taken from the field immediately and are then available for ginning whenever needed. Storing part of the seed cotton between picking and ginning allows growers to continue picking whenever the weather is favorable, even though the gins may not be able to keep up. Seed cotton storage usually reduces ginning costs, and a gin's seasonal capacity is increased by being able to operate more hours per year.
The study reported here indicates that total picker-to-gin costs per bale can be significantly lower with the module system than with the conventional trailer system or ricking. If a grower already has trailers, the module system requires considerably more additional investment in equipment than the ricking system. But modules can be taken from the field immediately and are then available for ginning whenever needed. Storing part of the seed cotton between picking and ginning allows growers to continue picking whenever the weather is favorable, even though the gins may not be able to keep up. Seed cotton storage usually reduces ginning costs, and a gin's seasonal capacity is increased by being able to operate more hours per year.
Applying a growth retardant through container irrigation systems
by Tok Furuta, W. C. Jones, W. Humphrey, Tom Mock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: SEVERAL DRIP AND SPRAY irrigation systems have been designed and successfully used to apply precise amounts of water and fertilizer to container-grown nursery plants. The usefulness of these systems for application of smaller amounts of other chemicals had not been tested. In these studies, tests were made of the possibilities for application of a growth retardant, ancymidol (A-Rest), through the irrigation system.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: SEVERAL DRIP AND SPRAY irrigation systems have been designed and successfully used to apply precise amounts of water and fertilizer to container-grown nursery plants. The usefulness of these systems for application of smaller amounts of other chemicals had not been tested. In these studies, tests were made of the possibilities for application of a growth retardant, ancymidol (A-Rest), through the irrigation system.
Herbicide Persistence and movement studies with molinate in rice irrigation management
by K. K. Tanji, J. W. Biggar, Mohsen Mehran, M. W. Cheung, D. W. Henderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These studies investigated the persistence of molinate (a selective herbicide registered for use in rice culture to control watergrass, or barnyardgrass) in flood and seepage waters, residues, and extent and speed of chemical movement. Results from these and earlier experiments show that water management and circulation in flooded rice fields are important considerations. Regardless of how uniformly a chemical is applied, downstream movement of water tends to redistribute it. Gusty winds can also modify chemical distribution. The redistribution of chemicals can be minimized by holding flood waters for a few days after application. Soil incorporation gives less residue in flood waters and drains than does water application.
These studies investigated the persistence of molinate (a selective herbicide registered for use in rice culture to control watergrass, or barnyardgrass) in flood and seepage waters, residues, and extent and speed of chemical movement. Results from these and earlier experiments show that water management and circulation in flooded rice fields are important considerations. Regardless of how uniformly a chemical is applied, downstream movement of water tends to redistribute it. Gusty winds can also modify chemical distribution. The redistribution of chemicals can be minimized by holding flood waters for a few days after application. Soil incorporation gives less residue in flood waters and drains than does water application.
Wetting agents for erosion control on burned water sheds
by N. Valoras, J. F. Osborne, J. Letey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE MANY ACRES of watershed in Southern California that burn each year constitute a serious potential for erosion, because the removal of protective vegetation and fire causes the land to become water repellent—instead of being absorbed, water tends to run off.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE MANY ACRES of watershed in Southern California that burn each year constitute a serious potential for erosion, because the removal of protective vegetation and fire causes the land to become water repellent—instead of being absorbed, water tends to run off.
Dry large lima beans benefit from lygus bug control
by R. W. Bushing, V. E. Burton, C. L. Tucker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Control of lygus bugs resulted in dry large Lima bean yield increases ranging from twice to six times more than control plots in Davis tests, over a four year period.
Control of lygus bugs resulted in dry large Lima bean yield increases ranging from twice to six times more than control plots in Davis tests, over a four year period.

News and Opinion

Agriculture, energy, and the year 2000
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 28, No.5

Cover:  A 24-ft module builder for seed cotton in operation in the Sun Joaquin Valley. The hydraulically-powered compacter cylinder and support carriage are shown near the rear. Raised module builder being pulled off the completed module in lower photo.
May 1974
Volume 28, Number 5

Research articles

Evaluation of man-made fog for frost protection of citrus in California
by R. F. Brewer, R. M. Burns, K. W. Opitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field evaluations of two fogging systems designed and marketed for frost protection of citrus in California indicated that, under ideal conditions, some protection to the area under the fog could be obtained. However, the major limitations still remaining with use of fog for frost protection include: producing enough fog particles of an effective size, and holding the fog in the area to be protected.
Field evaluations of two fogging systems designed and marketed for frost protection of citrus in California indicated that, under ideal conditions, some protection to the area under the fog could be obtained. However, the major limitations still remaining with use of fog for frost protection include: producing enough fog particles of an effective size, and holding the fog in the area to be protected.
The module system for storing and handling seed cotton
by R. A. Kepner, R. G. Curley, M. Hoover, L. K. Stromberg
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The study reported here indicates that total picker-to-gin costs per bale can be significantly lower with the module system than with the conventional trailer system or ricking. If a grower already has trailers, the module system requires considerably more additional investment in equipment than the ricking system. But modules can be taken from the field immediately and are then available for ginning whenever needed. Storing part of the seed cotton between picking and ginning allows growers to continue picking whenever the weather is favorable, even though the gins may not be able to keep up. Seed cotton storage usually reduces ginning costs, and a gin's seasonal capacity is increased by being able to operate more hours per year.
The study reported here indicates that total picker-to-gin costs per bale can be significantly lower with the module system than with the conventional trailer system or ricking. If a grower already has trailers, the module system requires considerably more additional investment in equipment than the ricking system. But modules can be taken from the field immediately and are then available for ginning whenever needed. Storing part of the seed cotton between picking and ginning allows growers to continue picking whenever the weather is favorable, even though the gins may not be able to keep up. Seed cotton storage usually reduces ginning costs, and a gin's seasonal capacity is increased by being able to operate more hours per year.
Applying a growth retardant through container irrigation systems
by Tok Furuta, W. C. Jones, W. Humphrey, Tom Mock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: SEVERAL DRIP AND SPRAY irrigation systems have been designed and successfully used to apply precise amounts of water and fertilizer to container-grown nursery plants. The usefulness of these systems for application of smaller amounts of other chemicals had not been tested. In these studies, tests were made of the possibilities for application of a growth retardant, ancymidol (A-Rest), through the irrigation system.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: SEVERAL DRIP AND SPRAY irrigation systems have been designed and successfully used to apply precise amounts of water and fertilizer to container-grown nursery plants. The usefulness of these systems for application of smaller amounts of other chemicals had not been tested. In these studies, tests were made of the possibilities for application of a growth retardant, ancymidol (A-Rest), through the irrigation system.
Herbicide Persistence and movement studies with molinate in rice irrigation management
by K. K. Tanji, J. W. Biggar, Mohsen Mehran, M. W. Cheung, D. W. Henderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These studies investigated the persistence of molinate (a selective herbicide registered for use in rice culture to control watergrass, or barnyardgrass) in flood and seepage waters, residues, and extent and speed of chemical movement. Results from these and earlier experiments show that water management and circulation in flooded rice fields are important considerations. Regardless of how uniformly a chemical is applied, downstream movement of water tends to redistribute it. Gusty winds can also modify chemical distribution. The redistribution of chemicals can be minimized by holding flood waters for a few days after application. Soil incorporation gives less residue in flood waters and drains than does water application.
These studies investigated the persistence of molinate (a selective herbicide registered for use in rice culture to control watergrass, or barnyardgrass) in flood and seepage waters, residues, and extent and speed of chemical movement. Results from these and earlier experiments show that water management and circulation in flooded rice fields are important considerations. Regardless of how uniformly a chemical is applied, downstream movement of water tends to redistribute it. Gusty winds can also modify chemical distribution. The redistribution of chemicals can be minimized by holding flood waters for a few days after application. Soil incorporation gives less residue in flood waters and drains than does water application.
Wetting agents for erosion control on burned water sheds
by N. Valoras, J. F. Osborne, J. Letey
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE MANY ACRES of watershed in Southern California that burn each year constitute a serious potential for erosion, because the removal of protective vegetation and fire causes the land to become water repellent—instead of being absorbed, water tends to run off.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE MANY ACRES of watershed in Southern California that burn each year constitute a serious potential for erosion, because the removal of protective vegetation and fire causes the land to become water repellent—instead of being absorbed, water tends to run off.
Dry large lima beans benefit from lygus bug control
by R. W. Bushing, V. E. Burton, C. L. Tucker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Control of lygus bugs resulted in dry large Lima bean yield increases ranging from twice to six times more than control plots in Davis tests, over a four year period.
Control of lygus bugs resulted in dry large Lima bean yield increases ranging from twice to six times more than control plots in Davis tests, over a four year period.

News and Opinion

Agriculture, energy, and the year 2000
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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