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California Agriculture, Vol. 28, No.3

Cover:  Typical design lor new combination pollination and pesticide duster being used in Coachella Valley date gardens.
March 1974
Volume 28, Number 3

Research articles

Using input-output models: Estimating economic impact of increasing irrigated farming in colusa county
by John W. Mamer, George E. Goldman, L. T. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE USE of input-output models to analyze resource choices was discussed in California Agriculture (May 1973). This article briefly describes the application of input-output to estimating the economic impact of expanding irrigated farming in Colusa County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE USE of input-output models to analyze resource choices was discussed in California Agriculture (May 1973). This article briefly describes the application of input-output to estimating the economic impact of expanding irrigated farming in Colusa County.
Controlling powdery mildew in outdoor roses
by A. O. Paulus, J. Nelson, O. Harvey, D. Maire, F. Shibuya
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The experimental fungicide El 273 provided excellent control of rose powdery mildew when applied in these tests on a 14-day spray schedule when mildew was severe before spray applications began. (Unfortunately, El 273 will not be marketed by the manufacturer.) Triforine gave good control with data from these and previous trials suggesting applications before appearance of rose powdery mildew, and on a nine-day spray schedule.
The experimental fungicide El 273 provided excellent control of rose powdery mildew when applied in these tests on a 14-day spray schedule when mildew was severe before spray applications began. (Unfortunately, El 273 will not be marketed by the manufacturer.) Triforine gave good control with data from these and previous trials suggesting applications before appearance of rose powdery mildew, and on a nine-day spray schedule.
Mechanical pollination of date palms
by R. M. Perkins, P. F. Burkner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercial mechanization of date pollination became a reality in 1973. Two men and a machine can service 60 to 80 acres applying pollen 12 times per season on a twice-weekly schedule. The unit is intended to supplement the decreasing labor force of experienced tree men while maintaining satisfactory grower returns on quality fruit. During other times of the year, the unit can be used to apply pesticide dusts.
Commercial mechanization of date pollination became a reality in 1973. Two men and a machine can service 60 to 80 acres applying pollen 12 times per season on a twice-weekly schedule. The unit is intended to supplement the decreasing labor force of experienced tree men while maintaining satisfactory grower returns on quality fruit. During other times of the year, the unit can be used to apply pesticide dusts.
Usefulness of market calves heterozygous for double muscling gene
by W. C. Rollins, R. B. Thiessen, Moira Tanaka
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research results presented here indicate a 10% advantage for double-muscled × normal calves in terms of pounds of trimmed retail cuts per day of age at marketing. No undesirable side effects occurred in either production or performance, and there was little or no reduction in carcass quality grade at marketing.
Research results presented here indicate a 10% advantage for double-muscled × normal calves in terms of pounds of trimmed retail cuts per day of age at marketing. No undesirable side effects occurred in either production or performance, and there was little or no reduction in carcass quality grade at marketing.
Rapid, uniform warming of cannery pears
by R. A. Parsons, E. C. Maxie, F. G. Mitchell, Gene Mayer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pears in a simulated bin were warmed for ripening from 30° to 68°F in 15 and 25 minutes with 110°F air forced through the bin with air flow rates of 2 and 1 cubic ft per minute per pound of fruit, respectively. Pears held for up to two hours in the warm, rapid air flow were not adversely affected. Pears ripened to processing firmness in three to four days when warmed to 68°F in four hours or less. Fruit delayed in warming from one to seven and one-half days was delayed in ripening in almost direct relation to the time required to reach 68°F. Slow warming resulted in uneven ripening with soft and hard fruit in the same him. The concept of a warming tunnel to attain uniform ripening and allow a processor to precisely program a canning schedule is suggested.
Pears in a simulated bin were warmed for ripening from 30° to 68°F in 15 and 25 minutes with 110°F air forced through the bin with air flow rates of 2 and 1 cubic ft per minute per pound of fruit, respectively. Pears held for up to two hours in the warm, rapid air flow were not adversely affected. Pears ripened to processing firmness in three to four days when warmed to 68°F in four hours or less. Fruit delayed in warming from one to seven and one-half days was delayed in ripening in almost direct relation to the time required to reach 68°F. Slow warming resulted in uneven ripening with soft and hard fruit in the same him. The concept of a warming tunnel to attain uniform ripening and allow a processor to precisely program a canning schedule is suggested.
Sprinkling for dust suppression in a cattle feedlot
by J. J. Carroll, J. R. Dunbar, R. L. Givens, W. B. Goddard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An investigation of the effectiveness of sprinkling to suppress dust and of its effect on the temperature and relative humidity in open cattle feedlot pens is reported here. One sprinkled feedlot and one unsprinkled feedlot, located in the Imperial Valley of California, were studied. Typical values of temperature and dew point temperature, as a function of time of day, are presented which illustrate their variability within each lot and between lots. The results indicate that: (1) A program of sprinkling the pens for 2 hours, beginning at 1 pm PDT and again for 1½ hours beginning about 5 pm PDT, should reduce the total dustiness by at least half. (2) Sprinkling appears to reduce the maximum temperature reached for the day (< 10°F) while raising the ambient relative humidity by not more than about 10%. (3) No deleterious effects on animal performance, morbidity, or mortality resulted from sprinkling. (4) No increase in fly or odor problems could be traced to sprinkling.
An investigation of the effectiveness of sprinkling to suppress dust and of its effect on the temperature and relative humidity in open cattle feedlot pens is reported here. One sprinkled feedlot and one unsprinkled feedlot, located in the Imperial Valley of California, were studied. Typical values of temperature and dew point temperature, as a function of time of day, are presented which illustrate their variability within each lot and between lots. The results indicate that: (1) A program of sprinkling the pens for 2 hours, beginning at 1 pm PDT and again for 1½ hours beginning about 5 pm PDT, should reduce the total dustiness by at least half. (2) Sprinkling appears to reduce the maximum temperature reached for the day (< 10°F) while raising the ambient relative humidity by not more than about 10%. (3) No deleterious effects on animal performance, morbidity, or mortality resulted from sprinkling. (4) No increase in fly or odor problems could be traced to sprinkling.
Feeding value of walnut meal for turkey poults
by F. H. Kratzer, Pran Vohra
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests reported here indicate that walnut meal may be used satisfactorily in the feed for turkey poults up to the 10% level.
Tests reported here indicate that walnut meal may be used satisfactorily in the feed for turkey poults up to the 10% level.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agriculture and water quality
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 28, No.3

Cover:  Typical design lor new combination pollination and pesticide duster being used in Coachella Valley date gardens.
March 1974
Volume 28, Number 3

Research articles

Using input-output models: Estimating economic impact of increasing irrigated farming in colusa county
by John W. Mamer, George E. Goldman, L. T. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE USE of input-output models to analyze resource choices was discussed in California Agriculture (May 1973). This article briefly describes the application of input-output to estimating the economic impact of expanding irrigated farming in Colusa County.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE USE of input-output models to analyze resource choices was discussed in California Agriculture (May 1973). This article briefly describes the application of input-output to estimating the economic impact of expanding irrigated farming in Colusa County.
Controlling powdery mildew in outdoor roses
by A. O. Paulus, J. Nelson, O. Harvey, D. Maire, F. Shibuya
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The experimental fungicide El 273 provided excellent control of rose powdery mildew when applied in these tests on a 14-day spray schedule when mildew was severe before spray applications began. (Unfortunately, El 273 will not be marketed by the manufacturer.) Triforine gave good control with data from these and previous trials suggesting applications before appearance of rose powdery mildew, and on a nine-day spray schedule.
The experimental fungicide El 273 provided excellent control of rose powdery mildew when applied in these tests on a 14-day spray schedule when mildew was severe before spray applications began. (Unfortunately, El 273 will not be marketed by the manufacturer.) Triforine gave good control with data from these and previous trials suggesting applications before appearance of rose powdery mildew, and on a nine-day spray schedule.
Mechanical pollination of date palms
by R. M. Perkins, P. F. Burkner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercial mechanization of date pollination became a reality in 1973. Two men and a machine can service 60 to 80 acres applying pollen 12 times per season on a twice-weekly schedule. The unit is intended to supplement the decreasing labor force of experienced tree men while maintaining satisfactory grower returns on quality fruit. During other times of the year, the unit can be used to apply pesticide dusts.
Commercial mechanization of date pollination became a reality in 1973. Two men and a machine can service 60 to 80 acres applying pollen 12 times per season on a twice-weekly schedule. The unit is intended to supplement the decreasing labor force of experienced tree men while maintaining satisfactory grower returns on quality fruit. During other times of the year, the unit can be used to apply pesticide dusts.
Usefulness of market calves heterozygous for double muscling gene
by W. C. Rollins, R. B. Thiessen, Moira Tanaka
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research results presented here indicate a 10% advantage for double-muscled × normal calves in terms of pounds of trimmed retail cuts per day of age at marketing. No undesirable side effects occurred in either production or performance, and there was little or no reduction in carcass quality grade at marketing.
Research results presented here indicate a 10% advantage for double-muscled × normal calves in terms of pounds of trimmed retail cuts per day of age at marketing. No undesirable side effects occurred in either production or performance, and there was little or no reduction in carcass quality grade at marketing.
Rapid, uniform warming of cannery pears
by R. A. Parsons, E. C. Maxie, F. G. Mitchell, Gene Mayer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pears in a simulated bin were warmed for ripening from 30° to 68°F in 15 and 25 minutes with 110°F air forced through the bin with air flow rates of 2 and 1 cubic ft per minute per pound of fruit, respectively. Pears held for up to two hours in the warm, rapid air flow were not adversely affected. Pears ripened to processing firmness in three to four days when warmed to 68°F in four hours or less. Fruit delayed in warming from one to seven and one-half days was delayed in ripening in almost direct relation to the time required to reach 68°F. Slow warming resulted in uneven ripening with soft and hard fruit in the same him. The concept of a warming tunnel to attain uniform ripening and allow a processor to precisely program a canning schedule is suggested.
Pears in a simulated bin were warmed for ripening from 30° to 68°F in 15 and 25 minutes with 110°F air forced through the bin with air flow rates of 2 and 1 cubic ft per minute per pound of fruit, respectively. Pears held for up to two hours in the warm, rapid air flow were not adversely affected. Pears ripened to processing firmness in three to four days when warmed to 68°F in four hours or less. Fruit delayed in warming from one to seven and one-half days was delayed in ripening in almost direct relation to the time required to reach 68°F. Slow warming resulted in uneven ripening with soft and hard fruit in the same him. The concept of a warming tunnel to attain uniform ripening and allow a processor to precisely program a canning schedule is suggested.
Sprinkling for dust suppression in a cattle feedlot
by J. J. Carroll, J. R. Dunbar, R. L. Givens, W. B. Goddard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An investigation of the effectiveness of sprinkling to suppress dust and of its effect on the temperature and relative humidity in open cattle feedlot pens is reported here. One sprinkled feedlot and one unsprinkled feedlot, located in the Imperial Valley of California, were studied. Typical values of temperature and dew point temperature, as a function of time of day, are presented which illustrate their variability within each lot and between lots. The results indicate that: (1) A program of sprinkling the pens for 2 hours, beginning at 1 pm PDT and again for 1½ hours beginning about 5 pm PDT, should reduce the total dustiness by at least half. (2) Sprinkling appears to reduce the maximum temperature reached for the day (< 10°F) while raising the ambient relative humidity by not more than about 10%. (3) No deleterious effects on animal performance, morbidity, or mortality resulted from sprinkling. (4) No increase in fly or odor problems could be traced to sprinkling.
An investigation of the effectiveness of sprinkling to suppress dust and of its effect on the temperature and relative humidity in open cattle feedlot pens is reported here. One sprinkled feedlot and one unsprinkled feedlot, located in the Imperial Valley of California, were studied. Typical values of temperature and dew point temperature, as a function of time of day, are presented which illustrate their variability within each lot and between lots. The results indicate that: (1) A program of sprinkling the pens for 2 hours, beginning at 1 pm PDT and again for 1½ hours beginning about 5 pm PDT, should reduce the total dustiness by at least half. (2) Sprinkling appears to reduce the maximum temperature reached for the day (< 10°F) while raising the ambient relative humidity by not more than about 10%. (3) No deleterious effects on animal performance, morbidity, or mortality resulted from sprinkling. (4) No increase in fly or odor problems could be traced to sprinkling.
Feeding value of walnut meal for turkey poults
by F. H. Kratzer, Pran Vohra
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests reported here indicate that walnut meal may be used satisfactorily in the feed for turkey poults up to the 10% level.
Tests reported here indicate that walnut meal may be used satisfactorily in the feed for turkey poults up to the 10% level.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agriculture and water quality
by J.B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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