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California Agriculture, Vol. 28, No.2

Cover:  Both male and female flowers are seen on this branch of normally dioecious Pistacia. Pistillate (left) and staminate (right) inflorescences at adjacent nodes are on a branch from a P. Vera x P. atlantica seedling.
February 1974
Volume 28, Number 2

Research articles

Hermaphroditism in pistacia
by Julian C. Crane
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pistacia species are normally dioecious. Three exceptions are reported here: (1) an apparent somatic mutation giving rise to a staminate bearing branch on an otherwise pistillate tree of P. atlantica, (2) a hybrid (P. Vera × P. atlantica) bearing approximately equal numbers of pistillate and staminate inflorescences, usually on separate branches, and (3) a similar hybrid, predominately staminate, but with several branches bearing pistillate inflorescences.
Pistacia species are normally dioecious. Three exceptions are reported here: (1) an apparent somatic mutation giving rise to a staminate bearing branch on an otherwise pistillate tree of P. atlantica, (2) a hybrid (P. Vera × P. atlantica) bearing approximately equal numbers of pistillate and staminate inflorescences, usually on separate branches, and (3) a similar hybrid, predominately staminate, but with several branches bearing pistillate inflorescences.
Control of strawberry fruitrot caused by Botrytcinerea
by Norman C. Welch, Art Greathead, AL Paulus, Royce Bringhurst
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: STRAWBERRY FRUIT ROT caused by Botrytis cinerea is a serious disease in central coastal areas. The disease can be found on all varieties during most of the fruiting season. Plants are particularly susceptible during periods of persistent rains in the spring, or low fog during the summer—both conditions leaving plants moist all night and part of the day.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: STRAWBERRY FRUIT ROT caused by Botrytis cinerea is a serious disease in central coastal areas. The disease can be found on all varieties during most of the fruiting season. Plants are particularly susceptible during periods of persistent rains in the spring, or low fog during the summer—both conditions leaving plants moist all night and part of the day.
Influence of crown orientatation at planting time on Asparagus
by F. D. Souther, F. H. Takatori, J. I. Stillman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Asparagus crowns were found to grow upward as new buds were formed above the older crowns. All crowns survived during the duration of this experiment] but those crowns planted upside-down yielded significantly less in both weight and number of spears than those planted upright (normal), sideways, or with roots folded under.
Asparagus crowns were found to grow upward as new buds were formed above the older crowns. All crowns survived during the duration of this experiment] but those crowns planted upside-down yielded significantly less in both weight and number of spears than those planted upright (normal), sideways, or with roots folded under.
Processing roughages for wintering steer calves
by J. L. Hull, J. B. Dobie, J. G. Morris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW QUALITY ROUGHAGES which have J limited alternate uses are important sources of feed for wintering young cattle. These feeds are characteristically low in digestible energy and protein, are high in fiber, and their intake by cattle is low. Previous experiments at Davis have shown that cubed rice straw, with appropriate supplementation, may be fed as a wintering ration for cattle with resultant body-weight gains of 0.5 to 0.8 lb per head per day. However, to obtain these gains from a low quality roughage, high feed intakes are necessary. The low intake of digestible energy is the main limitation in the use of poor quality roughages. Any method of feed processing which will increase feed intake will enhance the potential value of low quality roughages.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW QUALITY ROUGHAGES which have J limited alternate uses are important sources of feed for wintering young cattle. These feeds are characteristically low in digestible energy and protein, are high in fiber, and their intake by cattle is low. Previous experiments at Davis have shown that cubed rice straw, with appropriate supplementation, may be fed as a wintering ration for cattle with resultant body-weight gains of 0.5 to 0.8 lb per head per day. However, to obtain these gains from a low quality roughage, high feed intakes are necessary. The low intake of digestible energy is the main limitation in the use of poor quality roughages. Any method of feed processing which will increase feed intake will enhance the potential value of low quality roughages.
Possible new toxicant indicated in severe air pollution episode in south coast basin
by R. Oshima, O. C. Taylor, E. A. Cardiff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE PHOTOCHEMICAL air pollution episode that occurred between November 8 and 11, 1973, in the south coast air basin of California, was unusual because the accompanying weather conditions and the resulting injury to vegetation did not fit into the pattern normally associated with attacks of ozone and per-oxy acetyl nitrate (PAN). The injury to leafy vegetables was worse than usual, considering the concentration of phytotoxicants measured.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE PHOTOCHEMICAL air pollution episode that occurred between November 8 and 11, 1973, in the south coast air basin of California, was unusual because the accompanying weather conditions and the resulting injury to vegetation did not fit into the pattern normally associated with attacks of ozone and per-oxy acetyl nitrate (PAN). The injury to leafy vegetables was worse than usual, considering the concentration of phytotoxicants measured.
Effects of spraying chemicals on young citrus trees for frost protection
by R. M. Burns
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In attempts to increase the cold tolerance of young citrus trees, chemicals (including a growth retardant, three anti-transpirants and two plastics) were applied to grapefruit nursery trees that were then planted in the field. The results showed a slight but not commercially important increase in frost tolerance.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In attempts to increase the cold tolerance of young citrus trees, chemicals (including a growth retardant, three anti-transpirants and two plastics) were applied to grapefruit nursery trees that were then planted in the field. The results showed a slight but not commercially important increase in frost tolerance.
Spacing sugar beets for maximum production
by F. J. Hills, G. F. Worker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests indicate that maximum sugar production requires spacing beets no closer than 5 inches, in rows spaced 30 inches apart, or no closer than 7 inches in rows 14-26 inches apart (14 inches between rows on the bed and 26 inches between rows of adjacent beds), and that rows spaced 10-20 inches produced no more sugar than the 14-26-inch rows.
Tests indicate that maximum sugar production requires spacing beets no closer than 5 inches, in rows spaced 30 inches apart, or no closer than 7 inches in rows 14-26 inches apart (14 inches between rows on the bed and 26 inches between rows of adjacent beds), and that rows spaced 10-20 inches produced no more sugar than the 14-26-inch rows.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

A new law, a new problem: Pesticides for specialty crops
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Basic provisions of 1973 farm act
by James G. Youde
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 28, No.2

Cover:  Both male and female flowers are seen on this branch of normally dioecious Pistacia. Pistillate (left) and staminate (right) inflorescences at adjacent nodes are on a branch from a P. Vera x P. atlantica seedling.
February 1974
Volume 28, Number 2

Research articles

Hermaphroditism in pistacia
by Julian C. Crane
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pistacia species are normally dioecious. Three exceptions are reported here: (1) an apparent somatic mutation giving rise to a staminate bearing branch on an otherwise pistillate tree of P. atlantica, (2) a hybrid (P. Vera × P. atlantica) bearing approximately equal numbers of pistillate and staminate inflorescences, usually on separate branches, and (3) a similar hybrid, predominately staminate, but with several branches bearing pistillate inflorescences.
Pistacia species are normally dioecious. Three exceptions are reported here: (1) an apparent somatic mutation giving rise to a staminate bearing branch on an otherwise pistillate tree of P. atlantica, (2) a hybrid (P. Vera × P. atlantica) bearing approximately equal numbers of pistillate and staminate inflorescences, usually on separate branches, and (3) a similar hybrid, predominately staminate, but with several branches bearing pistillate inflorescences.
Control of strawberry fruitrot caused by Botrytcinerea
by Norman C. Welch, Art Greathead, AL Paulus, Royce Bringhurst
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: STRAWBERRY FRUIT ROT caused by Botrytis cinerea is a serious disease in central coastal areas. The disease can be found on all varieties during most of the fruiting season. Plants are particularly susceptible during periods of persistent rains in the spring, or low fog during the summer—both conditions leaving plants moist all night and part of the day.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: STRAWBERRY FRUIT ROT caused by Botrytis cinerea is a serious disease in central coastal areas. The disease can be found on all varieties during most of the fruiting season. Plants are particularly susceptible during periods of persistent rains in the spring, or low fog during the summer—both conditions leaving plants moist all night and part of the day.
Influence of crown orientatation at planting time on Asparagus
by F. D. Souther, F. H. Takatori, J. I. Stillman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Asparagus crowns were found to grow upward as new buds were formed above the older crowns. All crowns survived during the duration of this experiment] but those crowns planted upside-down yielded significantly less in both weight and number of spears than those planted upright (normal), sideways, or with roots folded under.
Asparagus crowns were found to grow upward as new buds were formed above the older crowns. All crowns survived during the duration of this experiment] but those crowns planted upside-down yielded significantly less in both weight and number of spears than those planted upright (normal), sideways, or with roots folded under.
Processing roughages for wintering steer calves
by J. L. Hull, J. B. Dobie, J. G. Morris
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW QUALITY ROUGHAGES which have J limited alternate uses are important sources of feed for wintering young cattle. These feeds are characteristically low in digestible energy and protein, are high in fiber, and their intake by cattle is low. Previous experiments at Davis have shown that cubed rice straw, with appropriate supplementation, may be fed as a wintering ration for cattle with resultant body-weight gains of 0.5 to 0.8 lb per head per day. However, to obtain these gains from a low quality roughage, high feed intakes are necessary. The low intake of digestible energy is the main limitation in the use of poor quality roughages. Any method of feed processing which will increase feed intake will enhance the potential value of low quality roughages.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW QUALITY ROUGHAGES which have J limited alternate uses are important sources of feed for wintering young cattle. These feeds are characteristically low in digestible energy and protein, are high in fiber, and their intake by cattle is low. Previous experiments at Davis have shown that cubed rice straw, with appropriate supplementation, may be fed as a wintering ration for cattle with resultant body-weight gains of 0.5 to 0.8 lb per head per day. However, to obtain these gains from a low quality roughage, high feed intakes are necessary. The low intake of digestible energy is the main limitation in the use of poor quality roughages. Any method of feed processing which will increase feed intake will enhance the potential value of low quality roughages.
Possible new toxicant indicated in severe air pollution episode in south coast basin
by R. Oshima, O. C. Taylor, E. A. Cardiff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE PHOTOCHEMICAL air pollution episode that occurred between November 8 and 11, 1973, in the south coast air basin of California, was unusual because the accompanying weather conditions and the resulting injury to vegetation did not fit into the pattern normally associated with attacks of ozone and per-oxy acetyl nitrate (PAN). The injury to leafy vegetables was worse than usual, considering the concentration of phytotoxicants measured.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE PHOTOCHEMICAL air pollution episode that occurred between November 8 and 11, 1973, in the south coast air basin of California, was unusual because the accompanying weather conditions and the resulting injury to vegetation did not fit into the pattern normally associated with attacks of ozone and per-oxy acetyl nitrate (PAN). The injury to leafy vegetables was worse than usual, considering the concentration of phytotoxicants measured.
Effects of spraying chemicals on young citrus trees for frost protection
by R. M. Burns
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In attempts to increase the cold tolerance of young citrus trees, chemicals (including a growth retardant, three anti-transpirants and two plastics) were applied to grapefruit nursery trees that were then planted in the field. The results showed a slight but not commercially important increase in frost tolerance.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In attempts to increase the cold tolerance of young citrus trees, chemicals (including a growth retardant, three anti-transpirants and two plastics) were applied to grapefruit nursery trees that were then planted in the field. The results showed a slight but not commercially important increase in frost tolerance.
Spacing sugar beets for maximum production
by F. J. Hills, G. F. Worker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests indicate that maximum sugar production requires spacing beets no closer than 5 inches, in rows spaced 30 inches apart, or no closer than 7 inches in rows 14-26 inches apart (14 inches between rows on the bed and 26 inches between rows of adjacent beds), and that rows spaced 10-20 inches produced no more sugar than the 14-26-inch rows.
Tests indicate that maximum sugar production requires spacing beets no closer than 5 inches, in rows spaced 30 inches apart, or no closer than 7 inches in rows 14-26 inches apart (14 inches between rows on the bed and 26 inches between rows of adjacent beds), and that rows spaced 10-20 inches produced no more sugar than the 14-26-inch rows.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

A new law, a new problem: Pesticides for specialty crops
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Basic provisions of 1973 farm act
by James G. Youde
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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